Advice required about a boss music!

Discussion in 'Resource Support' started by mi2, Jan 6, 2017.

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  1. mi2

    mi2 Veteran

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    Hello everyone !


    I was asking myself a question about music composing once again, and as the thread's title mentions it, about boss music composition especially. I've been trying to make one these past few days and somehow I'm unsatisfied with the result. I don't what it is, perhaps I don't find it powerful enough, or I don't know... so that's why I'm here. Perhaps you guys can help me make it better? Or give me advice on how to improve it ? Here is the part I've already composed of the song : https://instaud.io/HmF


    Any help is very much welcome ! Thanks for your time and thanks for reading ! :)
     
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  2. Ms Littlefish

    Ms Littlefish Dangerously Caffeinated Global Mod

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    If you want to add more power and drive to it, I'd probably bring another violin section that's an octave higher at the repeat of the phrase :)08). You could also use some brass to start making a secondary rhythm against those strings. Something punctuated and fanfar-ish. Basically, start layering and mixing the timbre of instruments. I wouldn't wait much longer than those introductory phrases to start introducing the melodic sections of the song, though.
     
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  3. mi2

    mi2 Veteran

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    @Ms Littlefish How should I lay the violin section? Same to the background ones?


    Sadly, I don't really know how to lay brass sections and they usually sound off compared to the rest of the song, any ideas on that?


    I also think I have a huge problem with layering because I seem pretty bad at it, any advice? And I considered this to already be the core of the song, how should make it more like so? 


    Sorry for the flood of questions, but I'm in dire need :/ Thanks for the answer you already provided tho ! :)  
     
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  4. mlogan

    mlogan Global Moderators Global Mod

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    I've moved this thread to Resource Support. Please be sure to post your threads in the correct forum next time. Thank you.



    Art, Literature and Music is for showcasing your work that's not intended for others to use.
     
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  5. Ms Littlefish

    Ms Littlefish Dangerously Caffeinated Global Mod

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    Layering can be achieved in several ways. By combining different families of instruments, blending textures, answering the call of another instrument, creating harmonies, and using counterpoints, etc. Practice is always going to make perfect, so the best advice I have is to never be afraid to try something new and then ask for feedback. You can always delete what you don't like. I'm always happy to listen to songs for people.  :)  
     


    If you want the motifs already present to be the basis of the song, I'd definitely second my recommendation to create layers and variation. Add new instrument voices, progress the chords more, and make small changes from one phrase to the next. Otherwise, the repetition will become too stagnant. Though, I also really suggest you create a counterpoint or melody of some sort; perhaps a sustained one, to contrast the movement of that line and give something that drives the song from one section to the next. 


    Laying the other violins with the first track would work fine, especially if you intend that to the primary thing they play. But, experiment with panning instruments around the track to create depth and fullness. I personally try to mimic the layout of a symphonic orchestra when I place instruments. You might find something that makes it sound bigger and boomier.


    I hope this helps. XD
     
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  6. mi2

    mi2 Veteran

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     This is in fact most helpful, though if you'll excuse me, I still have some questions :p


    What do you call "a counterpoint" or what do you mean by texture? Some musical vocabulary is still unknown to me :/


    And do you perhaps have any other tips about layering? I understand practice makes perfect, but I'm just wondering ^^ 


    thanks for your time! :)  
     
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  7. Ms Littlefish

    Ms Littlefish Dangerously Caffeinated Global Mod

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    A counterpoint is a harmonic line that moves independently of the melody. So, basically a harmony with a different rhythm. Texture is a combination of the rhythmic, tonal, and voice characteristics of the instruments sounding that determine the overall feeling of that section of music. The difference between something sounding shrill and gritty, or buttery and serene. 


    For layering your instruments, a good tip is to try coming up with a theme for how you want to build them. Do you want to play with soft and loud? Short and long? Dissonance and tonality? Sometimes it helps to just write down a bunch of words you want your song to embody and think about how the characteristics of musical technique and instrument selection can help express it. If your word was "power" would you think of certain instrument first? Do you hear short note rhythms or long ones? Etc. If your second word was "love" would you think of a different instrument? A different rhythm? You can take all your words and figure out how you could build it into a cohesive piece of music. I do that sometimes. 
     
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  8. mi2

    mi2 Veteran

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    Again, most helpful advice ! Thank you so much ! Everything is duly noted and I'll try to put it in practice in my next session ! 


    Though I have one last question : do you perhaps have any documentations on the "feeling" every instrument provides? I feel like I'm missusing some, or perhaps not using them at their full potential, so I was wondering if you had anything like that!


    Other than that, you've answered most of my interrogations, so thank you very much for your answers !
     
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  9. Ms Littlefish

    Ms Littlefish Dangerously Caffeinated Global Mod

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    No problem! The exciting and beautiful thing about the voice quality of instruments is their character can be morphed dramatically by playing technique and is largely subjective. There is a lot a composer can interpret, and no instrument is one dimensional. That's why a flute can be both sultry and romantic played one way, and frantic and abrasive another way. I don't have any documentations, but try listening to a couple works of music and reacting to the instrumentation and how they're organized. It should help you develop your own sense of the thoughts and stories the music is projecting. 
     
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  10. mi2

    mi2 Veteran

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    Alright, thanks a lot ! That concludes my line of questionning ^^


    Thanks so much for your time and precious tips !
     
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