Big Map vs Small Maps

Discussion in 'General Discussion' started by Bokou, Nov 29, 2015.

  1. Bokou

    Bokou Veteran Veteran

    Messages:
    35
    Likes Received:
    159
    First Language:
    English
    Primarily Uses:
    N/A
    I'm working on my first RM game in RMMV, and I'm curious if I should make large maps or multiple small maps for an area such as a forest. Here's an example:

    Should this forest be one big map like pictured (90x90) or should I break it into nine small 30x30 maps, what are the pros and cons? Thanks for the help!

    [​IMG]
     
    #1
    Prizm Daystar likes this.
  2. Silenity

    Silenity Veteran Veteran

    Messages:
    648
    Likes Received:
    241
    Location:
    Oregon
    First Language:
    English
    Primarily Uses:
    RMMV
    Pros: less lag

    I'd break it up into multiple maps. Perhaps you could add stronger variety of creatures as the party progresses through as well.
     
    #2
    Bokou likes this.
  3. The Art of Gaming

    The Art of Gaming Owner of the Green Tunic in Dreamland Veteran

    Messages:
    88
    Likes Received:
    31
    Location:
    Khura'in
    First Language:
    English
    Big map:

        Pro: Don't have to constantly check maps so it matches up

       Con: Lots of lag

    Small map:

    Pro: More animated sprites/ tiles

    Con: You have have to make a huge map into nine small ones 
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Nov 29, 2015
    #3
    Bokou likes this.
  4. bgillisp

    bgillisp Global Moderators Global Mod

    Messages:
    12,416
    Likes Received:
    12,649
    Location:
    USA
    First Language:
    English
    Primarily Uses:
    RMVXA
    I'd go big map. 90 x 90 is not really that big if you think about it, and in ACE I did some 90 x 90's without anything to prevent lag and they worked fine. Just don't go crazy with events though.

    However...if you insist on breaking it up into multiple maps, might I suggest 4 45 x 45 maps instead? I've been using 45 x 45 as a basic grid in my game and it seems to work well.
     
    #4
    Bokou likes this.
  5. ZServ

    ZServ Veteran Veteran

    Messages:
    248
    Likes Received:
    64
    I'm always a fan of smaller maps. Most of the time my design process starts as defining what the area needs to be for gameplay (theoretically, I mean. Towns play differently than dungeons, which play differently than open world, etc). After that, I'll define my entry/exit points, and build around those until they're the only way in/out of the map. The key thing about smaller maps is that it's much easier to identify the "feel" of the map-- are corridors fine, or do we want more winding passageways? In addition to that, you can later redefine the area with later maps. So, you have your forest start at the top left, and move towards the bottom right. Maybe you decide X quadrant doesn't fit well. That's suddenly much easier to fix. Maybe you decide it should be more of a mountain-type forest in that quadrant. Means you can design that part separately and integrate it when you're ready. Iono, just personally feel smaller maps are easier to work with. Just my take!
     
    #5
    Bokou likes this.
  6. Wavelength

    Wavelength Pre-Merge Boot Moderator

    Messages:
    4,518
    Likes Received:
    3,771
    Location:
    Florida, USA
    First Language:
    English
    Primarily Uses:
    RMVXA
    The main advantage of using one big map is that it feels more immersive - you're not constantly doing the "jump" between maps.  The main disadvantage is that (at least in XP/VX/Ace, and probably in MV) lag increases exponentially as you add size and events to maps.  So if this map is going to have upwards of 100 events on it, you might want to break it up into smaller maps.

    A couple other considerations:

    • If you have Visible Encounters, smaller maps generally work better because you won't have weird situations where all the encounters are clustering in one spot as they chase you around the map.
    • The immersion break can be avoided on smaller, segmented maps by being very careful about where you place each tile (to make sure they meet up at the edges) and using the "None" transition between maps.  The player will not be able to detect that they changed maps!
    • If you have cutscenes taking place on the maps, make sure the whole cutscene takes place on the same map to avoid having to jump through hoops with your eventing.
    • Smaller maps will allow you to use different tilesets for different parts of your forest/other area, if you so desire.
     
    #6
    Bokou likes this.
  7. Shaz

    Shaz Veteran Veteran

    Messages:
    37,952
    Likes Received:
    11,614
    Location:
    Australia
    First Language:
    English
    Primarily Uses:
    RMMV
    I've moved this thread to General Discussion - map size is not a game mechanic. Please be sure to post your threads in the correct forum next time. Thank you.
     
    #7
  8. nerdypants

    nerdypants Veteran Veteran

    Messages:
    62
    Likes Received:
    7
    First Language:
    Singlish
    90x90 seems medium sized to me
     
    #8
  9. Prizm Daystar

    Prizm Daystar Social Butt Veteran

    Messages:
    80
    Likes Received:
    19
    First Language:
    English
    INSPIRATION AHOY

    ====

    Now for me to be more serious:  Map sizes in MV are a slight bit more limited.  I think they said the max was 256x256?  Also, having a larger map for a first-time game might seem like a bad idea, but you've done...surprisingly well with this one.  You should see my crap 60x60 one in my first project, "The Wonderful Wilford Warfstache!". (forum post in Early Project Feedback) Even I feel like I did a terrible job there.  But, thanks a bunch for showing off something more formidably labyrinthine in its appearance!

    This gives me ideas for how I should make the Atlas area look.  Not like a forest, but a large undercity with limited access to the city above it -- MY point there is that this shows me that I don't know how to maze good.

    As far as if you're going to event a map that big?  I think I'll agree there, don't go crazy.  I haven't hit any sort of lag limitations on my project with the maps that I've made, but I don't know what my computer is truly capable of when it comes to RPG Maker MV at present, so my system might not lag in comparison to someone else's whenever I do map testing...
     
    #9
    Bokou likes this.
  10. Kes

    Kes Global Moderators Global Mod

    Messages:
    21,086
    Likes Received:
    10,712
    First Language:
    English
    Primarily Uses:
    RMVXA
    Either can work equally well.  It depends on a wide range of factors including a whole host of other mechanics.  I think it is not a question that can be answered in isolation from everything else.

    The way you set up your encounters has already been mentioned, and Wavelength explains one implication.

    The number and type of events.

    How, if at all, you want to handle the exploration of optional side areas.

    How, if at all, you want to build in enemy progression within one location.

    How, if at all, you want to handle back tracking.

    Your skill level as a mapper.  

    I expect there are other elements which should be factored in, but those are the ones which spring immediately to mind.

    Map size should not just be an arbitrary large/small decision.  It should be considered on a map by map basis as part of the specific design decision for this particular location.
     
    #10
    Bokou likes this.
  11. DarknessFalls

    DarknessFalls Rpg Maker Jesus - JS Dev. Veteran

    Messages:
    1,393
    Likes Received:
    209
    First Language:
    English
    I have one large map, only one - parallaxing it is a night mare. Its 75x125 and it consists of three towns, couple camps and a some other jazz. The player will be spending more then five minutes here, in fact they will spend probably a lot of time here.

    I have tested such map with 345 events, 245 in parallel - no lag on my mid 2010 mac book pro or my mid 2012 mac mini.

    It all comes down to, how details can you make it? why are you making it? what purpose does it serve? what will the player get out of it? What are you doing there? how does it fit into your story? why did you create it? and a bunch of other questions.

    people will yell at you for making a large map, people will criticize you. But if you do it right, if you plan it right. then you can pull it off :)
     
    #11

Share This Page