Does anyone have any dungeon screenshots they'd be willing to share?

lokiie1984

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I've been playing around with dungeon idea's and I'd help if I could look at some other people have made. I'm not looking to copy or anything but just get an idea on how they can look. I'd especially be interested in seeing ones that look different to what can be easily done in the map editor. An explanation of why you chose to do what you did would be appreciated but not required.

Another question, on larger dungeons, do people prefer to have it all be in one map? Not counting falling to lower floors. Or would it be better (easier to create / decorate maybe?) to have it be a number of smaller maps with transitions?

So far I've only set up one dungeon, not finished, I like the idea of it but it feels like it's probably too big. And too... square, but I'm not sure if I can do much about that with rpg maker being based around square tiles.

I actually just found a blog post by Avery ( I think that's who it was) about rounding out some of the cliff faces so that's an option. The next dungeon i plan to do is kind of a cave / dirt tunnel thing, and I'd really prefer it to be the least square possible.

Anyway looking forward to seeing what others have come up with.

Thanks
 

Andar

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there are as of now twelve (?) topics "map and game screenshots" or so (all but the latest closed due to being too large) where people screenshot their maps and discuss them.

please search for them, they should give more than enough inspiration and they even discuss why a given map is good or bad.
 

Soulrender

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When you design your dungeon you must first think what kind of dungeon is it:

Ruined Structure​

Once occupied, this place is now abandoned (completely or in part) by its original creator or creators, and other creatures have wandered in. Many subterranean creatures look for abandoned underground constructions in which to make their lairs. Any traps that might exist have probably been set off, but wandering beasts might very well be common.

Occupied Structure​

This type of dungeon is still in use. Creatures (usually intelligent) live there, although they may not be the dungeon’s creators. An occupied structure might be a home, a fortress, a temple, an active mine, a prison, or a headquarters. This type of dungeon is less likely to have traps or wandering beasts, and more likely to have organized guards—both on watch and on patrol. Traps or wandering beasts that might be encountered are usually under the control of the occupants. Occupied structures have furnishings to suit the inhabitants, as well as decorations, supplies, and the ability for occupants to move around (doors they can open, hallways large enough for them to pass through, and so on). The inhabitants might have a communication system, and they almost certainly control an access to the outside.

Safe Storage​

When people want to protect something, they might bury it underground. Whether the item they want to protect is a fabulous treasure, a forbidden artifact, or the dead body of an important figure, these valuable objects are placed within a dungeon and surrounded by barriers, traps, and guardians.

The safe storage type of dungeon is the most likely to have traps but the least likely to have wandering beasts. This type of dungeon normally is built for function rather than appearance, but sometimes it has ornamentation in the form of statuary or painted walls. This is particularly true of the tombs of important people.

Sometimes, however, a vault or a crypt is constructed in such a way as to house living guardians. The problem with this strategy is that something must be done to keep the creatures alive between intrusion attempts. Magic is usually the best solution to provide food and water for these creatures. Even if there’s no way anything living can survive in a safe storage dungeon, certain monsters can still serve as guardians. Builders of vaults or tombs often place undead creatures or constructs, both of which have no need for sustenance or rest, to guard their dungeons. Magic traps can attack intruders by summoning monsters into the dungeon. These guardians also need no sustenance, since they appear only when they’re needed and disappear when their task is done.

Natural Cavern Complex​

Underground caves provide homes for all sorts of subterranean monsters. Created naturally and connected by a labyrinthine tunnel system, these caverns lack any sort of pattern, order, or decoration. With no intelligent force behind its construction, this type of dungeon is the least likely to have traps or even doors.

Fungi of all sorts thrive in caves, sometimes growing in huge forests of mushrooms and puffballs. Subterranean predators prowl these forests, looking for those feeding upon the fungi. Some varieties of fungus give off a phosphorescent glow, providing a natural cavern complex with its own limited light source. In other areas, a daylight spell or similar magical effect can provide enough light for green plants to grow.

Often, a natural cavern complex connects with another type of dungeons, the caves having been discovered when the manufactured dungeon was delved. A cavern complex can connect two otherwise unrelated dungeons, sometimes creating a strange mixed environment. A natural cavern complex joined with another dungeon often provides a route by which subterranean creatures find their way into a manufactured dungeon and populate it.

When you will know what type of dungeon you want to make, then the best is to do a research about it. For example: You want to make a dungeon in castle, then "Ahh let me check the google -> type castle dungeons -> images... You watch image for a while, then look at the tiles you have in project.... Got it! I know how my dungeon will look like."


Anyway, have some examples from my game:
Sample #1
Sample #2
Sample #3
 

Ellenor

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I think you should round the tiles if you want natural looking caves.
RMXP came with rounded tiles by default, no idea why that was removed in later versions...

Anyway, when it comes to large dungeons, I don't care if it is one big map or many small ones, however it can be easier for people to remember where they are with more small ones, and easier for you as a designer to decorate it as it wont feel as such a huge mental task when you can finish each small map in a rather resonable amount of time.

When it comes to the looks... You can use google to search for dungeons to get an idea how you want it to look.
Or as Andar suggested take a peek in the maps and screenshot topic.
 

SGHarlekin

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If we're talking different from the default, you can check out Dungeon Rummage - Another Isekai in my signature. There's screenshots available.
 

ATT_Turan

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There's also a tutorial on mapping dungeons on the main blog from just last week.
 

sunnyFVA

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If the squareness you want to avoid is the "rooms and hallways" feel, you could look to real-world building floorplans for inspiration. Shopping malls are particularly useful (a piece of advice I heard in the context of tabletop RPGs from WebDM on Youtube) for their variety and emphasis on traffic flow. Also, roughly sketching out your layout before you start mapping is always a good idea. You'll still have to moderate your scale, but it will help to get your thoughts in order and make sure the map contains your overall thesis without excessive meandering or dead space.

On the topic of fewer, larger maps versus many smaller maps, I have gravitated towards the latter. As @Ellenor said, being able to break up the area into pieces that fit together helps both the designer and the player avoid getting lost. I've also found that this doesn't have to sacrifice the meaningful sense of a place's grand scale. Instead, you reduce the risk of mental fatigue (again, for both you and your player) by making each section feel like a distinct component of a whole.
 

Mike-Turtle

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'Square' dungeons can be fine so long as it makes sense. Square caves, for example are okay if they were artificially made by your world's inhabitants. Natural caves however need curves. I've included some screenshots straight from the editor of both some square and non-square dungeons.

You'll notice they are small, and that's because I like to break dungeons up into many parts. Partly because Evergloom has a heavy ABS which works better on smaller maps, but also because I don't think you need massive maps... although I know that is a matter of preference.
 
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Here's a few of my puzzle dungeons from my game. There's no battles, but maybe you could pull some inspiration from them and think about their layouts and such as you make your game.

Screen Shot 2022-06-08 at 8.46.25 AM.png
Here's a fairly small room I made in a hedge maze. As you can see, the entrance is on the right leading to other rooms, but this is the 1st room the player walks into, and there's a chest in sight. It's incentive to come back here through some other means.
Screen Shot 2022-06-08 at 8.47.17 AM.png
In this one, the player has to search for some necessary items that can help them solve puzzles later down the road. But this involves navigating through a maze of mining equipment and junk. There's little bits of chests and hidden items for utility use sprinkled in there as well. There's even some boxes you can push out of the way!


Screen Shot 2022-06-08 at 8.47.28 AM.png
Here's one where it's a sewer dungeon. The events you see with the red circles are called B-DOINGS, (I made it up and the pixel art). What they do is bounce you directly across by 3 "tiles" (sometimes I had to event it to where it would bounce you further south/north to give the illusion of jumping over vertical spaces). As you can see, some will send you directly into the water (which resets your position), while bouncing on some in a certain order will allow you to progress to another area that would usually be inaccessible.

Screen Shot 2022-06-08 at 8.48.32 AM.png
This is not as obvious as the other ones, but here in this hallway, these 2 doors are actually doors that lead to 6 rooms total.
Depending on if there's no gem, a yellow gem, or a pink gem in the slot next to those doors, it will transfer the player to a different room. The gems are items you have to insert and remove as you please, so you can manually come in and out of completely different rooms from the same points.

Screen Shot 2022-06-08 at 8.48.42 AM.png
And finally here's one of my personal favorites, the Mirror Room. Here, the goal was to collect items from other rooms in this dungeon, and bring them all to this room in order to create a mirrored point on the left and right sides. This would unlock new things for an ultimate goal.


Like I said before, these are puzzle dungeons, but maybe it could help inspire you!
 

lokiie1984

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When you design your dungeon you must first think what kind of dungeon is it:

Ruined Structure​

Once occupied, this place is now abandoned (completely or in part) by its original creator or creators, and other creatures have wandered in. Many subterranean creatures look for abandoned underground constructions in which to make their lairs. Any traps that might exist have probably been set off, but wandering beasts might very well be common.

Occupied Structure​

This type of dungeon is still in use. Creatures (usually intelligent) live there, although they may not be the dungeon’s creators. An occupied structure might be a home, a fortress, a temple, an active mine, a prison, or a headquarters. This type of dungeon is less likely to have traps or wandering beasts, and more likely to have organized guards—both on watch and on patrol. Traps or wandering beasts that might be encountered are usually under the control of the occupants. Occupied structures have furnishings to suit the inhabitants, as well as decorations, supplies, and the ability for occupants to move around (doors they can open, hallways large enough for them to pass through, and so on). The inhabitants might have a communication system, and they almost certainly control an access to the outside.

Safe Storage​

When people want to protect something, they might bury it underground. Whether the item they want to protect is a fabulous treasure, a forbidden artifact, or the dead body of an important figure, these valuable objects are placed within a dungeon and surrounded by barriers, traps, and guardians.

The safe storage type of dungeon is the most likely to have traps but the least likely to have wandering beasts. This type of dungeon normally is built for function rather than appearance, but sometimes it has ornamentation in the form of statuary or painted walls. This is particularly true of the tombs of important people.

Sometimes, however, a vault or a crypt is constructed in such a way as to house living guardians. The problem with this strategy is that something must be done to keep the creatures alive between intrusion attempts. Magic is usually the best solution to provide food and water for these creatures. Even if there’s no way anything living can survive in a safe storage dungeon, certain monsters can still serve as guardians. Builders of vaults or tombs often place undead creatures or constructs, both of which have no need for sustenance or rest, to guard their dungeons. Magic traps can attack intruders by summoning monsters into the dungeon. These guardians also need no sustenance, since they appear only when they’re needed and disappear when their task is done.

Natural Cavern Complex​

Underground caves provide homes for all sorts of subterranean monsters. Created naturally and connected by a labyrinthine tunnel system, these caverns lack any sort of pattern, order, or decoration. With no intelligent force behind its construction, this type of dungeon is the least likely to have traps or even doors.

Fungi of all sorts thrive in caves, sometimes growing in huge forests of mushrooms and puffballs. Subterranean predators prowl these forests, looking for those feeding upon the fungi. Some varieties of fungus give off a phosphorescent glow, providing a natural cavern complex with its own limited light source. In other areas, a daylight spell or similar magical effect can provide enough light for green plants to grow.

Often, a natural cavern complex connects with another type of dungeons, the caves having been discovered when the manufactured dungeon was delved. A cavern complex can connect two otherwise unrelated dungeons, sometimes creating a strange mixed environment. A natural cavern complex joined with another dungeon often provides a route by which subterranean creatures find their way into a manufactured dungeon and populate it.

When you will know what type of dungeon you want to make, then the best is to do a research about it. For example: You want to make a dungeon in castle, then "Ahh let me check the google -> type castle dungeons -> images... You watch image for a while, then look at the tiles you have in project.... Got it! I know how my dungeon will look like."


Anyway, have some examples from my game:
Sample #1
Sample #2
Sample #3
Thanks for the info. I'll be coming back to reread through all it all a number of times as I figure out my dungeons. I think the one that i started on yesterday would fall under Occupied Structure. It's a modern / sci fi theme, military base type of dungeon that's got something loose inside it. It definitely needs a massive redesign after reading this post. Smaller maps that fit together, really sounds like the way to go.
If we're talking different from the default, you can check out Dungeon Rummage - Another Isekai in my signature. There's screenshots available.


'Square' dungeons can be fine so long as it makes sense. Square caves, for example are okay if they were artificially made by your world's inhabitants. Natural caves however need curves. I've included some screenshots straight from the editor of both some square and non-square dungeons.

You'll notice they are small, and that's because I like to break dungeons up into many parts. Partly because Evergloom has a heavy ABS which works better on smaller maps, but also because I don't think you need massive maps... although I know that is a matter of preference.
When I was thinking about the cave, i kept going back to FF6 in the very beginning of the game. But like you said, that one is a mine so it being more square makes sense. The cave I'm planning on is a tunnel the character finds in her backyard. More of a natural small cave then mine shafts. If I wanted to keep it going, it would lead into sewers and stuff like that but not this early in the game.

The map above i really like. The wall tiles don't look like anything in MZ so I'm assuming it's one you made and not from the map editors generics. Did you create the wall tiles or maybe use a stone slab from a different set? Looks really neat.

I actually just stumbled onto a forum post you responded to about this map from last year. It looks like you use MV, seems like we didn't get the same stuff in MZ. But it still gives me some good ideas on using other objects for walls. Especially for caves and other non man made dungeons.

When you design your smaller maps that fit into a larger dungeon, do you draw out the large dungeon and then break into smaller parts or do you start with smaller ones first?
Here's a few of my puzzle dungeons from my game. There's no battles, but maybe you could pull some inspiration from them and think about their layouts and such as you make your game.

Like I said before, these are puzzle dungeons, but maybe it could help inspire you!
You are definitely better with puzzles then I am lol. I haven't put a whole lot of thought into puzzles yet besides a couple forum searches to see what others are doing. I figured I'd do some but probably keep them simple. Find switches to do something that lets the player pass the obstacle. I'm not even sure what other simple puzzle options there are. I mean I'm sure there's tons. I never was very good with puzzles in rpg games lol.

In your game, when the player comes to these puzzles do they know what the goal of the puzzle is before they start? Or what the puzzle expects them to do? That was always my issue, I rarely understood what I was supposed to be doing so I'd just start experimenting and mess the whole thing up lol. I really liked when the devs added a reset button.

-------

Anyway, thanks for responses and screenshots. I need to look into different wall tiles, or other things i can use in place of wall tiles. Floor maps for real world buildings could be interesting to look into too. I tried that for a house once but it didn't work out well. Too extreme (the only floor plan I found was some super high end mansion lol)
 
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SGHarlekin

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Here's a bunch of maps I made from the old version of my game.
Map013.png
Map024.png
Map034.png
Map042.png
Map043.png
Map044.png
 
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You are definitely better with puzzles then I am lol. I haven't put a whole lot of thought into puzzles yet besides a couple forum searches to see what others are doing. I figured I'd do some but probably keep them simple. Find switches to do something that lets the player pass the obstacle. I'm not even sure what other simple puzzle options there are. I mean I'm sure there's tons. I never was very good with puzzles in rpg games lol.

In your game, when the player comes to these puzzles do they know what the goal of the puzzle is before they start? Or what the puzzle expects them to do? That was always my issue, I rarely understood what I was supposed to be doing so I'd just start experimenting and mess the whole thing up lol. I really liked when the devs added a reset button.

-------

Anyway, thanks for responses and screenshots. I need to look into different wall tiles, or other things i can use in place of wall tiles. Floor maps for real world buildings could be interesting to look into too. I tried that for a house once but it didn't work out well. Too extreme (the only floor plan I found was some super high end mansion lol)

Usually the puzzle is either 1 of the two:

1) Puzzle is so simple that it's self-explanatory (go find the stuff in the maze. go jump on the B-doings to explore. find key to unlock door).

2) Puzzle is not so simple to the point where I must include hints or some form of an in-game guidance. It's very much necessary because while you might feel like the solution is simple...real players might think otherwise.
 

lokiie1984

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Usually the puzzle is either 1 of the two:

1) Puzzle is so simple that it's self-explanatory (go find the stuff in the maze. go jump on the B-doings to explore. find key to unlock door).

2) Puzzle is not so simple to the point where I must include hints or some form of an in-game guidance. It's very much necessary because while you might feel like the solution is simple...real players might think otherwise.
Most of the puzzles I have so far fit the first category I think. I did lay out a decent two map cave dungeon that is to serve as the first dungeon and first combat experience. So I wanted to have some basic puzzles to show case the characters abilities. Figured I would break the puzzles down by the skill used to solve it.

Lilly - Telepathic
Hikari - Strength

So one is a poison cloud caused by a mushroom, they need to backtrack a lil bit and find a large rock to throw onto the mushroom. Another is a locked door / gate where they cant pass until Lilly uses some brain power to mind control someone on the other side to open it.

The whole dungeon is a cave / tunnel in the ground that's full of evil teddy bears that are trying summon a demon. I mentioned in another thread, the first half of the game give or take is fueled by Lilly's imagination. So most of the villains and locations are based around things a 6 year old girl would think up. Even though to her and those around her, it's real.

So to challenge the player, I have a couple riddle locks on the second map in a small library set up. I haven't decided if I both doors (one to progress and one to a chest) should open with the same riddle or use a different one.

This time around instead of getting myself all confused with the rpg maker map editor, I just went and sketched out the maps in photoshop. That did make it a lot easier.

Map 1


First Cave Dungeon Map 1.png

Map 2


First Cave Dungeon Map 2.png

Now that i think about it, I should probably move the library to the top left corner instead of being right next to the riddle doors.

Side note: Until i saw the reply from Sword_of_Dusk i thought your forum avatar was eating a phone. I never actually noticed your name lol.
 

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