Ever Feel Self-Conscious about Your Game?

Discussion in 'General Lounge' started by Orgaya, Mar 21, 2017.

  1. Orgaya

    Orgaya Veteran Veteran

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    Recently I've been casting a net to several Let's Players to get some feedback on my project, but once I do I realize that I owe it to them to watch some of their previous videos to give them support. However, every time I do, I get a crushing sense of inferiority. The moment I see something neat in the game, or if there's a nice effect, or if the LPer compliments them, my immediate reaction is to remove my game from the internet forever and hide under the bed to escape my shame. And if they're reviewing a "bad" game, the only thought I have is that my own game is just like that and will garner the exact same reactions.

    Anyone else feel like this? Anyone previously felt like this and then managed to get over it, thus are in a position to offer some heartwarming, uplifting, movie cliche advice to us downtrodden?
     
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  2. HexMozart88

    HexMozart88 The Master of Random Garbage Veteran

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    I feel like this literally all the time, with everything. I've thrown out several pieces of art that way.
     
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  3. Trihan

    Trihan Speedy Scripter Veteran

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    You are your own worst critic.

    There will never be anyone who's as harsh on your game as you are, because to you it represents the culmination of every hour you put into it, every late night you spent tweaking balance, every day you felt a little bit closer to releasing it and yet still so far away. Nobody else will ever have the same connection to your game as you do, even if it's the greatest thing they've ever played.

    What someone else might think is a really well-balanced fight, you may find too easy, because you have explored every nook and cranny your game has to offer. You know all the tricks, all the secrets, every hidden passage and battle strategy. The game has no challenge for you because you were the one who decided how much of a challenge it would be in the first place.

    Acknowledging that is the first step to accepting that you're going to have these feelings, and then just let them drift away. At the end of the day, you've created the game you released, and it will be judged on its merits as that game. If someone doesn't enjoy a particular aspect of it, it doesn't mean nobody will. If you get a lot of people saying they don't like it, it's probably within your power to change it for an update release. If it isn't within your power to change it, there's no point in worrying that people don't like it. Worrying about things you can't do anything about is an incredibly unproductive use of your time. Worry about the things you can change, then change them so you don't have to worry about them.
     
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  4. dragoonwys

    dragoonwys Freelance Illustrator Veteran

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    Yeah yourself is your worst critic, I can name many times that I feel the stuff I do isn't good enough and that 'I shouldn't show anyone this crap' after looking at my colleague's work.

    Better finished than 'perfect', is a good saying. There is no such thing as the 'perfect' game or anything in general really, you'll keep getting better and keep raising that bar whether you like it or not. If you don't put something out there, then no one is going to know about that thing at all. If you see something neat in someone else's game that you didn't do in yours. Instead of 'Man, I should have done that in my game.' think 'Wow I should totally do something like that in my next one.' Same goes for mistakes, just learn and don't do it next time around~ ouo7
     
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  5. chaucer

    chaucer Veteran Veteran

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    Well, I know my first game was horrible, even my second game to be honest, really sucked, and I've only made those 2 games haha, but I've actually learned quite a bit from those 2 really, really, REALLY, bad games. IMO, the first thing you should do is ask yourself, did you make a real effort on this project? If you did, then you should definitely NOT be ashamed, infact you should feel proud, even if it's not perfect, at least you've made a real effort. Even if it gets bad reviews, most LPer's will give you constructive criticism,(at least the good ones) and THIS is one of the best ways to get better as a game developer, hearing what you got right, what you could use improvement on, and having an open mind to accept that criticism, and to learn from the mistakes you've made. IMO the only time you should be ashamed of a game, is when you've put zero effort into it and try to profit from it.

    That being said, be proud of your game, :D even if it is bad, just make sure you are willing to learn from it. I'm sure you didn't feel ashamed when learning to ride a bike, it's the same concept here, and if you get it wrong, just try again :D just learn to understand what went wrong and try to fix it next time. Another thing, even if the lets player doesn't like your game, theres billions of people in the world, and everyone has different likes/dislikes, so it's good to also keep that in mind, you'll never make a game that everyone in the world loves, some will hate it, some will love it, whether it's good or bad.
     
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  6. Ms Littlefish

    Ms Littlefish Dangerously Caffeinated Global Mod

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    I think it's only a little natural. If you spent months of your time on something you're in love with, it can make you apprehensive when others don't feel that same love. Though, others have said we're our own worst critics. Things I've felt "meh" about have turned out to be someone's favorite. It always amuses me in a very good way. It's something that takes a lot of work, self-reflection, and upkeep; but when we realize that the only person we need to compete with is ourselves, it becomes a lot easier to brush off a lot of the external noise.
     
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  7. Milennin

    Milennin "With a bang and a boom!" Veteran

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    I have this much more with my art or writing, rather than the games I make, which I guess might have played as part of the reason why my last game was full RTP assets and had no character dialogue, lol. But when it comes to games, I think it's just important to be confident about your mechanics, and all the other things you put in. You made all that stuff for a reason, so as long as you put enough thought into everything you did, why should it suck? The only reason to fear bad reactions is if you threw something together at random without putting in passion.
     
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  8. GoodSelf

    GoodSelf Zhu Li! Do the thing! Veteran

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    Wether your game is good or bad, never let the experience you had with it bring you down. Instead, use your successes and your failures to build yourself up.
     
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  9. mogwai

    mogwai 1984 Veteran

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    I used the default RTP guy Harold, and for some reason I kept spelling it Harlold.

    I'm too lazy to reupload it. I'm not self conscious about my game, but I am paranoid about it. That I didn't notice for 3 days, it feels like sabotage.
     
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  10. byronclaude

    byronclaude Master of all things... (except the things I am no Veteran

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    This is an interesting subject... that I feel very strongly about.

    It is okay to feel self-conscious about your game... but it should ONLY apply to yourself.

    When you create a game, you are in essence creating a world... and that is YOUR world. :D The main reason many of us get into this is to experience the joy that comes with creating such a world.

    With that I say - if you are creating a world that satisfies your imagination, and that world is beautiful in your own eyes... it really doesn't matter at all what others say. If they despise it, it simply means they are missing the beauty that you yourself find so tantalizing.

    I know, from a marketing perspective, negative feedback is not a great thing... ...but it isn't everything. A good artist is out to create a thing of beauty... not please a public base that is often impossible to please.

    Lastly - never take negative feedback personal (under any circumstances). If someone tears into my project too hard, I try to view the conversation with a degree of humor.:wub
     
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  11. Reapergurl

    Reapergurl Drummer Extraordinaire! xD Veteran

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    I second that. Especially the part about enjoying a world we find beautiful.

    As far as criticism goes, true, we are our own worst critics, however, in my case, the only time I criticize my own work is if I know there's a flaw (this will catch my eye nine hundred ninety-nine time of a hundred).

    As a result, I rarely criticize myself because I see the flaw and correct it quickly.

    In RM creation, I double plus check every little bit of dialogue and use \N[#] for names to avoid @mogwai 's errors. I also make sure that the dialogue text remains within the box, and use the Dynamic Text option as necessary to create more than four lines.

    If I have a hard time remembering how to spell a word, I run it through Word Pad or Open Office.

    I'm very thorough in my creation; it's the other parts involved that tend to seize things up.

    I get criticized by other people a lot; ninety-six percent of it is mere trolling, which I ignore unless it threatens life and limb.

    Yup! Amelia's not afraid to make people regret being ignorantly stupid! :yhappy:
     
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