Examples of Non-Experience based Level grinds?

Discussion in 'Game Mechanics Design' started by Roguedeus, May 29, 2019.

  1. Umbreon

    Umbreon Furry Veteran

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    No need for disparity between stats if you have the maximum everywhere. Indeed.
     
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  2. Roguedeus

    Roguedeus It's never too late to procrastinate... Veteran

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    I've spent a lot of time, of late, designing asymmetric Class-Skill mechanics that revolve around different types of magic power, rather than race. Each power type had it's own means of leveling, and it's own skills. The further I went with it, the more laborious it became, until I had to step back.

    In the end, I realized that I was one person with only so much time and ability.

    So, I gutted it almost entirely for what I am planning to do now. It keeps a lot of its flavor, but is a lot less filling. ;)

    Currently, I am torn between a JP + Skill Learning mechanic and a purely Equipment sourced skill mechanic (where Class dictates which Equipment can be worn).

    The game I am currently redesigning, for the umpteenth time, will have similar spikes in both advancement and risk as most Rogue-likes, which lends itself to a less 'Grind Heavy' style of play.

    I've recently been playing City of Heroes again, which is very 'Skill' focused. Gear is purely cosmetic.

    I highly recommend it. If for no other reason than to get an idea of what passed for an action MMO back when MMO's were still a relatively new genre.

    Oddly, as I mentioned previously. I am starting to lean more towards Equipment sourced skills, rather than away.
     
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  3. empresskiova

    empresskiova Untitled Project1 Veteran

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    Not really an RPG, but it is turn based...

    Age of Empires: Age of Kings on the DS (so, not the PC), had a neat veterancy mechanic. Every 3 battles a unit survived gave them a medal (to a max of 3 medals). Each medal gave them +15% to attack and defense (the combat stats of the game). It didn’t matter what those battles were against either, since you could attack buildings for the stats boost too.

    You could translate this to RPG Maker by having a relatively large party, but most fights are exhausting (enemies could hit really hard). Each fight an actor survives bumps their stats a little bit, but switching that party member out takes away the bonus. To help prevent heal spam, you can just make healing hard to do.

    Another somewhat grind heavy game was Legend of Dragoon. In it, you had normal Levels and Dragoon Levels. The normal levels were the same as usual, but the Dragoon Levels had to be leveled with attacking. Since the game featured QTE’s for its attacks, your reaction skill helped with the grind for Dragoon Levels (which were very powerful).
     
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  4. jwgz

    jwgz Villager Member

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    One game that comes to mind here is Chrono Cross, which ditched the traditional EXP system in favor of story milestones and bosses.

    Most common battles in CC would give you very small and random stat raises (i.e. maybe +1 to HP, +1 to ATK, or possibly even nothing). Or at least they seemed random, but there could've been a rhythm to it... not sure.

    Until you got to a boss, that is, in which case defeating the boss would advance the story and grant you a "Star Level" that would actually boost your stats substantially in the traditional way, immediately after defeating the boss. There were optional bosses, too, but these were often a bit harder than the mainline bosses.

    You might think that this eliminated grinding, but it actually didn't, because you could keep having random battles to augment your stats if you wished (although the game's somewhat lax difficulty made this unnecessary). Plus, the game also had a crafting system for accessories, weapons, and equipment as well (rudimentary, of course, and rather simple by today's standards, but it was there). You also bought and equipped your abilities instead of learning them via leveling (although each character did have 3 techniques unique to themselves that they would learn after certain levels or milestones).
     
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