how do i put an rpg maker xp projects on github?

The_cool_Treecko

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the title says it, how do i put a rpg maker project on github? i have been trying for a lot of time and i just can't figure it out.
 

Capitán

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What do you mean by "on github", do you want your game files on github as a way to store them. Or do you want your game to be playable on a github domain?
 

orochi2k

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Just push/pull the entire game folder.
But, it's unlikely you can make a default RMXP game directly running on github unless you also get something like a cloud windows system hosted somewhere.
 

The_cool_Treecko

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oh ok

What do you mean by "on github", do you want your game files on github as a way to store them. Or do you want your game to be playable on a github domain?
so that the whole dev team can access it and i can putthe updateson it rather than uploading the whole thing on g drive again and again i.e. as storage
 

Nolonar

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Putting your project on github is simple.

Prerequisite
Check if git is installed on your PC. If not, install git (https://git-scm.com/). To check, open a CLI (command line interface) window, like cmd or Powershell (Windows) or Terminal (Linux and macOS). Git should already be installed on Linux and macOS, but it doesn't hurt to check anyway.

Type git --version in your command line window. Note that there are two hyphens (-) before "version", and only one whitespace (between "git" and the first hyphen).

At this point, I'd recommend installing Visual Studio Code (https://code.visualstudio.com/), which can greatly help you with the following process. If you choose to use Visual Studio Code, you can skip to the bottom.

If you use the CLI
From here on, I'll assume you're using either PowerShell (Windows) or Terminal (Linux and macOS) as your CLI.

Step 1
Create a new project for your game on github. You'll be redirected to the git page of your new project. There should be a green "Code" button. Click on it, and you'll see a URL that starts with https:// and ends with .git. You'll need that URL in step 3.

Step 2
Create a folder on your PC, where you'll be storing all your github projects (do not copy your game files in there yet), and open that folder in your CLI.

On Windows, this can be done by right-clicking on the folder in File Explorer while holding the Shift key down on your keyboard, then choosing the "Open PowerShell window here" option.

Alternatively, open your CLI and type cd [path to the git folder]. If your git folder is in:
  • Windows: C:\Users\[your user name here]\source\repos
  • Linux: /home/[your user name here]/source/repos
  • macOS: /Users/[your user name here]/source/repos
you can type: cd ~/source/repos. The tilde (~) character is a shortcut to your home directory.

Step 3
From here on, we'll assume your github repo folder is located in: ~/source/repos/RMGames

You should now see the following line on your CLI:
Windows: PS C:\Users\[your user name here]\source\repos\RMGames>
Linux and macOS: [user name]@[computer name]:~/source/repos/RMGames$

Simply type: git clone [URL of git repo] [name of folder]. This will create a folder with the name you specified. If you didn't specify a name, the folder will be named after the git project name. You should have gotten the URL from step 1.

Step 4
Move or copy your game files into the folder created by git.

To upload your game to github:
  1. Add your game files to your git project with: git add -A. The "-A" part means you're adding all files.
  2. Commit the changes to your local repository with: git commit -m "commit message". The "commit message" is used to describe what you've changed. For the first commit, you may use "Initial commit". Any subsequent commits should be as descriptive as possible.
  3. Upload all commits to github with: git push
To retrieve any changes made by others, use git pull or git fetch

Whenever you make changes, you need to do git add folder/file, for example: git add Game.ini or git add Titles/Title.png or git add -A, then commit, then push.

If you made any changes to a file already added, but not yet committed, you'll need to add the file again before committing. Otherwise the new change won't be on github when you push.

You can make multiple commits before pushing them all to github.

Note that when multiple people work on the same project, merge conflicts can happen. This usually happens when two people were making changes to the same file.
Handling merge conflicts is a rather large and complex thing, which I don't feel confident enough in to explain here.

If you use Visual Studio Code
Step 1

Right-click on your game's folder and select "Open with Code".

Step 2
On the left side of Visual Studio Code, you'll see a bunch of icons. Click on the third icon from the top to open the "Source Control" side bar.

Step 3
Click on the "Publish to GitHub" button. You'll need to allow the GitHub extension to log in to your github. This will open a new tab in your browser.

Once you're done, your browser might ask if you want to allow Visual Studio Code to open a certain link. You need to allow that too in order to finalize the process.

Step 4
A small window will open in the upper part of Visual Studio Code. The window asks you if you want to create a public or private repository.

A public repository is visible to anyone, while a private repository is only visible to collaborators you've invited. In either case, only collaborators with the necessary rights can make changes to your repository.

Your collaborators can use Visual Studio Code to clone your project. The process is similar to the above, except they need to open a new window in Visual Studio Code for step 1. They'll also need your github repo URL as detailed in If you use the CLI: Step 1.

When you make changes to your project:
  1. Open the Source Control side bar (see step 2 above). You'll see a list of files you've made changes to.
  2. Select the files to see the exact changes made, and click on the plus (+) button to "Stage Changes". Your file will move from "Changes" to "Staged Changes". You can undo this by selecting the file and clicking on the minus (-) button to "Unstage Changes".
  3. Write a commit message in the "Message" textbox above "Staged Changes". Try to be as descriptive as possible, so that you and your collaborators know what the commit changed.
  4. Click on the checkmark (✓) button to "Commit".
  5. In the bottom left of Visual Studio Code, to the right of "master", you'll see a circular arrow symbol with a number, a downward arrow, another number, and an upward arrow next to it. Click on that button to "Synchronize Changes"
When someone else made a change to your project:
  1. The circular arrow button (see 5. above) should have a number larger than 0 next to the downward pointing arrow. If so, someone has uploaded a change to github. Simply click the button to download that change.

I hope this was the info you were looking for.
 

The_cool_Treecko

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Putting your project on github is simple.

Prerequisite
Check if git is installed on your PC. If not, install git (https://git-scm.com/). To check, open a CLI (command line interface) window, like cmd or Powershell (Windows) or Terminal (Linux and macOS). Git should already be installed on Linux and macOS, but it doesn't hurt to check anyway.

Type git --version in your command line window. Note that there are two hyphens (-) before "version", and only one whitespace (between "git" and the first hyphen).

At this point, I'd recommend installing Visual Studio Code (https://code.visualstudio.com/), which can greatly help you with the following process. If you choose to use Visual Studio Code, you can skip to the bottom.

If you use the CLI
From here on, I'll assume you're using either PowerShell (Windows) or Terminal (Linux and macOS) as your CLI.

Step 1
Create a new project for your game on github. You'll be redirected to the git page of your new project. There should be a green "Code" button. Click on it, and you'll see a URL that starts with https:// and ends with .git. You'll need that URL in step 3.

Step 2
Create a folder on your PC, where you'll be storing all your github projects (do not copy your game files in there yet), and open that folder in your CLI.

On Windows, this can be done by right-clicking on the folder in File Explorer while holding the Shift key down on your keyboard, then choosing the "Open PowerShell window here" option.

Alternatively, open your CLI and type cd [path to the git folder]. If your git folder is in:
  • Windows: C:\Users\[your user name here]\source\repos
  • Linux: /home/[your user name here]/source/repos
  • macOS: /Users/[your user name here]/source/repos
you can type: cd ~/source/repos. The tilde (~) character is a shortcut to your home directory.

Step 3
From here on, we'll assume your github repo folder is located in: ~/source/repos/RMGames

You should now see the following line on your CLI:
Windows: PS C:\Users\[your user name here]\source\repos\RMGames>
Linux and macOS: [user name]@[computer name]:~/source/repos/RMGames$

Simply type: git clone [URL of git repo] [name of folder]. This will create a folder with the name you specified. If you didn't specify a name, the folder will be named after the git project name. You should have gotten the URL from step 1.

Step 4
Move or copy your game files into the folder created by git.

To upload your game to github:
  1. Add your game files to your git project with: git add -A. The "-A" part means you're adding all files.
  2. Commit the changes to your local repository with: git commit -m "commit message". The "commit message" is used to describe what you've changed. For the first commit, you may use "Initial commit". Any subsequent commits should be as descriptive as possible.
  3. Upload all commits to github with: git push
To retrieve any changes made by others, use git pull or git fetch

Whenever you make changes, you need to do git add folder/file, for example: git add Game.ini or git add Titles/Title.png or git add -A, then commit, then push.

If you made any changes to a file already added, but not yet committed, you'll need to add the file again before committing. Otherwise the new change won't be on github when you push.

You can make multiple commits before pushing them all to github.

Note that when multiple people work on the same project, merge conflicts can happen. This usually happens when two people were making changes to the same file.
Handling merge conflicts is a rather large and complex thing, which I don't feel confident enough in to explain here.

If you use Visual Studio Code
Step 1

Right-click on your game's folder and select "Open with Code".

Step 2
On the left side of Visual Studio Code, you'll see a bunch of icons. Click on the third icon from the top to open the "Source Control" side bar.

Step 3
Click on the "Publish to GitHub" button. You'll need to allow the GitHub extension to log in to your github. This will open a new tab in your browser.

Once you're done, your browser might ask if you want to allow Visual Studio Code to open a certain link. You need to allow that too in order to finalize the process.

Step 4
A small window will open in the upper part of Visual Studio Code. The window asks you if you want to create a public or private repository.

A public repository is visible to anyone, while a private repository is only visible to collaborators you've invited. In either case, only collaborators with the necessary rights can make changes to your repository.

Your collaborators can use Visual Studio Code to clone your project. The process is similar to the above, except they need to open a new window in Visual Studio Code for step 1. They'll also need your github repo URL as detailed in If you use the CLI: Step 1.

When you make changes to your project:
  1. Open the Source Control side bar (see step 2 above). You'll see a list of files you've made changes to.
  2. Select the files to see the exact changes made, and click on the plus (+) button to "Stage Changes". Your file will move from "Changes" to "Staged Changes". You can undo this by selecting the file and clicking on the minus (-) button to "Unstage Changes".
  3. Write a commit message in the "Message" textbox above "Staged Changes". Try to be as descriptive as possible, so that you and your collaborators know what the commit changed.
  4. Click on the checkmark (✓) button to "Commit".
  5. In the bottom left of Visual Studio Code, to the right of "master", you'll see a circular arrow symbol with a number, a downward arrow, another number, and an upward arrow next to it. Click on that button to "Synchronize Changes"
When someone else made a change to your project:
  1. The circular arrow button (see 5. above) should have a number larger than 0 next to the downward pointing arrow. If so, someone has uploaded a change to github. Simply click the button to download that change.

I hope this was the info you were looking for.
would atom work as an alternative to visual studio code?
 

Nolonar

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would atom work as an alternative to visual studio code?
I've never used atom, so I don't know. Most code editors should have some form of git integration, though.

If not, the first half of my answer ("If you use the CLI") should still work regardless.
 

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