How many times have you wanted to quit?

alltheyuriz

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How many times have you wanted to quit making your game and just pack up?

i just started and i habe wanted to
 

Dororo

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I've just started and I know there are very boring moments. For example, you already know the plot so writing it is not exciting as playing it and have such surprise.

Anyway, that's a normal "depressive" cycle.
There's a moment you'll get hyped again. Mostly midway.
That's why is better to start with something small to begin with, so such depressive stall last less, you'll end something, you'll get feedbacks and you're "stronger" the next time.
 

KazukiT

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I just went through I "quit RPG Maker" phase during the summer. However, after some time RPG Maker caters to most of my creative sensibilities. Besides, if I get better with the engine I could make better games.
 

Kupotepo

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Can I say right now? Well, I mean sometimes I feel really empty and feel like anyone wouldn't care. Yeah, most of that I probably feel when things do not go as the plan.
I feel like when I do not feel creative. I am just doing something else. Who knows I might get new ideas to experiment in RPG Maker.

Tips: joining the game jam is great to help you with productivity and time management in the game development.

I guess I end with a positive note: be proud of your imperfect game and give love to it to make it grow.
 
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taarna23

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Eh, I quit every couple weeks. Usually I'm back at it within a few days. Wanting to quit is usually a sign that I need to take a break and just play games for a day or two, and not worry about being productive.

As for RPG Maker in general, I did quit it. For a couple of years. Learned some Game Maker. Learned some Pixel Game Maker MV.

I wasn't making the game I truly wanted to. Fact is, I'm still not. However, I don't have the resources or skills to make the game I really want to. It took me those couple of years to learn to work within my means. I have what I need to make this game in RPG Maker. I picked up MZ, adapted a plugin of mine that I need for the project, and even made it work better.

Now, I just keep on keeping on. I switch what I'm working on if I need to. I take a break when I need to (like when I quit again). And I don't let perfect be the enemy of good. My project will never be 100% of what I wanted, and that's okay. I'm going to make it work with what I've got.
 

MerlinCross

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All the time. If feels like work and I could be getting more enjoyment out of actually PLAYING games than making them.

But something clicked in me due to the pandemic and lock downs earlier this year and I wanted to actually get off my butt and make a thing. Game, drawing, small written collection, streaming, just something more than "DING another level up in another MMO game".

I still want to quit at times because I get frustrated but the community I've seen here and on Discord channels has been pretty helpful and welcoming. Good support system to keep me going.
 

KazukiT

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@Kupotepo I get those thoughts in my head from time to time. I just remind myself people like my games despite their imperfections.

@taarna23 I was feeling like I wanted to work on another game after I made 3 parallax maps back to back. Then I started working on the title screen picture and I felt the inspiration surging back.
 

TeiRaven

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Here's my tale of woe, if anyone cares to read it. Perhaps someone will find something of use in it. I am extremely familiar with the nasty little voice telling me to give up.
I grew up with extremely limited access to video games. (I got my first game system--a Switch Lite--for my 26th birthday.) But once upon a time when I was in 8th grade, aimlessly scrolling Yahoo Games for free trials, I tripped across a game called Aveyond. There aren't many things I can look at and say "this was a moment that changed my life's path," but that is surely one of them. I fell in love. Aveyond remains my video game comfort food to this day.

Through the Aveyond forums, I discovered RPG Maker. It hadn't really occurred to me that people make these games, and I was enthralled by this new way to tell a story. I loved writing, I loved art--why had no one told me that video games were both? I spent untold hours noodling in RMXP. I loved it. Everyone on the Aveyond forums was so kind and helpful--I had a chance to meet Amanda when I was in high school, and she was so supportive.

I don't know that I ever wanted to quit until I majored in game design in college.

And man, that was rough. I had a professor tell me that you can't make "real" games with RPG Maker. 90% of my classmates said the same. One professor asked if one of my artist friends would go to that school instead of me. Every "discussion" had a winner and it was always the other person. 90% of the time, "peer critique" was a thinly-veiled excuse for a handful people--and a handful of professors--to be mean to everyone else. One said to my friend, "I only passed you because I didn't want to see you in my class again."

Ouch. What happened to that world full of supportive people that I had come from?

Junior year, in a fit of despair, I created a game just for myself called "This Is Why You Do This." It was more of an animation than a game, I suppose. A journal entry of sorts. I mapped out my little apartment with all its dirty dishes and heaps of textbooks. I evented all the nasty things people had said.

And then I called up screenshots from the project I'd worked on all through high school that the professor said wasn't "real." Screenshots from Aveyond. Screenshots from a little Christmas-themed game that I'd done for a handful of my friends. I pulled up screencaps of the compliments people had given me on my sprites, my mapping--anything nice that I could find. The messages I got when my friends found the easter eggs I'd put for them in the Christmas game, messages from my high school roommate who used to sit with me for an hour after our art class was out and look at what I'd done, and tell me her very strong opinions on the good, the bad, and the indifferent about it. She pushed me to come up with better and better than I had before.

This is why you do this. I went back to that so many times. I'm sure I still have it, on a flashdrive somewhere.

I interned with a Real (tm) company on a Real (tm) game. I bought the humble bundle when MV came out, and never downloaded most of it. My well-worn RMXP gathered dust. I got my expensive piece of paper that says I'm qualified to design games. And I never designed a game again--the desire to create something to share with the world had been completely beaten out of me.

Until last month.

I chanced across a contest run by an art software company. The prizes were extraordinary, and the theme sounded like fun, and I thought "well, you can't win if you don't play!" And I had just about hatched a concept for what I wanted to draw when I saw in the fine print that the number of notes the piece got on social media would be a judging factor. Well. By that, I couldn't win if I did play, and I was very disappointed. I sulked for a while. I complained a lot to my friends. I said some things about wanting to quit art on the whole.

However. Spite, my friends, is a powerful motivator.

I rolled my art concept around until I shook a world out of it. I rolled the world around for a while until I shook a story out of it. I found something that stoked my fire, and fed it. For a week, I had more fun than I had since halfway through college. Things were coming together! This is why you do this!

And then the doubts started to settle in. Nobody cares about what you do. Your stories aren't even that good. Someone's going to crucify you for some small mistake.


And to that, I have two things to say.

The first comes from Neil Gaiman's blog: "It does help, to be a writer, to have the sort of crazed ego that doesn’t allow for failure."

The second comes from this comic by artist Ethan Catt: "You ain't reason."

This year has been worse than ever. It's all bad news all the time in my house. My Real Job (tm) sucks the creativity out of me with more efficiency than a vampire with a straw. I haven't beaten that nasty little voice in the back of my head that says no one cares, your stories aren't that good, no one wants another RMXP game. When it feels like I'm working in a vacuum, it's worse, because it's an echo chamber of bad.

Smash the windows in the echo chamber. Find what stokes your fire, and feed it.

Am I typing all this out because I need to hear it myself? You bet I am.

How many times have I wanted to quit? At least once more, Miss Swann.

EDIT: oh goodness that got long. Tossing it under spoiler tags so no one has to scroll for 8000 years to get past it.
 

lianderson

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@TeiRaven Your story has touched this one's meaning. Tears were almost made manifest. These pretentious artists shall be placed onto the altar!

Good day humans. Smash all the windows!
 

Hyouryuu-Na

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Lost count actually. I get the urge to detach from game development very frequently. I'm a student so I don't really get much time in the first place to work on my project as much I want to. And aside from that, I procrastinate a lot. My main project is also something that personally, I think is impossible to do without a team. And me having trust issues and lack of willingness to cooperate with people doesn't help. I don't know... I just hate teamwork. I decided to do it myself. And the constant failure to do certain stuff really makes me demotivated and that's when I feel like nah, I should just step away. But game development is one of the more relaxing things I do every day so I stick around and work on side projects till I can muster the motivation to work on my main one. Also, coming up with solutions for problems that I encounter while developing my game allows me to train my brain logically which is pretty useful since I'm a cse student and I love to fiddle with problems like these. And last but not least, I make games because I love doing it. It makes me feel like I can do stuff most people can't. It makes me feel useful and productive. It's a hobby entirely and so I have no deadlines. I can always come back and pick up where I left off. So I don't lose hope and leave permanently.

@Alltheyurxzi Don't give up. Of course there are times like these... but if this is what you love, don't just leave. Keep working and hopefully, you'll reach a point where game development will become something very natural to you.
 

Finnuval

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Every other week prolly. Until I recatch my Breath and get at it again.

@TeiRaven thaat sounded eerily familiair. Good for you to write it down in public!
 

Milu

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I have quit making my game(s) a few times. But I have always returned at some point. Usually, even a long break has been useful. It gives fresh perspective.

I also have many hobbies. Kind of too many. On the other hand, game making gives fresh perspective to writing novels, and vice versa...
 
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KazukiT

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Here's my tale of woe, if anyone cares to read it. Perhaps someone will find something of use in it. I am extremely familiar with the nasty little voice telling me to give up.
I grew up with extremely limited access to video games. (I got my first game system--a Switch Lite--for my 26th birthday.) But once upon a time when I was in 8th grade, aimlessly scrolling Yahoo Games for free trials, I tripped across a game called Aveyond. There aren't many things I can look at and say "this was a moment that changed my life's path," but that is surely one of them. I fell in love. Aveyond remains my video game comfort food to this day.

Through the Aveyond forums, I discovered RPG Maker. It hadn't really occurred to me that people make these games, and I was enthralled by this new way to tell a story. I loved writing, I loved art--why had no one told me that video games were both? I spent untold hours noodling in RMXP. I loved it. Everyone on the Aveyond forums was so kind and helpful--I had a chance to meet Amanda when I was in high school, and she was so supportive.

I don't know that I ever wanted to quit until I majored in game design in college.

And man, that was rough. I had a professor tell me that you can't make "real" games with RPG Maker. 90% of my classmates said the same. One professor asked if one of my artist friends would go to that school instead of me. Every "discussion" had a winner and it was always the other person. 90% of the time, "peer critique" was a thinly-veiled excuse for a handful people--and a handful of professors--to be mean to everyone else. One said to my friend, "I only passed you because I didn't want to see you in my class again."

Ouch. What happened to that world full of supportive people that I had come from?

Junior year, in a fit of despair, I created a game just for myself called "This Is Why You Do This." It was more of an animation than a game, I suppose. A journal entry of sorts. I mapped out my little apartment with all its dirty dishes and heaps of textbooks. I evented all the nasty things people had said.

And then I called up screenshots from the project I'd worked on all through high school that the professor said wasn't "real." Screenshots from Aveyond. Screenshots from a little Christmas-themed game that I'd done for a handful of my friends. I pulled up screencaps of the compliments people had given me on my sprites, my mapping--anything nice that I could find. The messages I got when my friends found the easter eggs I'd put for them in the Christmas game, messages from my high school roommate who used to sit with me for an hour after our art class was out and look at what I'd done, and tell me her very strong opinions on the good, the bad, and the indifferent about it. She pushed me to come up with better and better than I had before.

This is why you do this. I went back to that so many times. I'm sure I still have it, on a flashdrive somewhere.

I interned with a Real (tm) company on a Real (tm) game. I bought the humble bundle when MV came out, and never downloaded most of it. My well-worn RMXP gathered dust. I got my expensive piece of paper that says I'm qualified to design games. And I never designed a game again--the desire to create something to share with the world had been completely beaten out of me.

Until last month.

I chanced across a contest run by an art software company. The prizes were extraordinary, and the theme sounded like fun, and I thought "well, you can't win if you don't play!" And I had just about hatched a concept for what I wanted to draw when I saw in the fine print that the number of notes the piece got on social media would be a judging factor. Well. By that, I couldn't win if I did play, and I was very disappointed. I sulked for a while. I complained a lot to my friends. I said some things about wanting to quit art on the whole.

However. Spite, my friends, is a powerful motivator.

I rolled my art concept around until I shook a world out of it. I rolled the world around for a while until I shook a story out of it. I found something that stoked my fire, and fed it. For a week, I had more fun than I had since halfway through college. Things were coming together! This is why you do this!

And then the doubts started to settle in. Nobody cares about what you do. Your stories aren't even that good. Someone's going to crucify you for some small mistake.

And to that, I have two things to say.

The first comes from Neil Gaiman's blog: "It does help, to be a writer, to have the sort of crazed ego that doesn’t allow for failure."

The second comes from this comic by artist Ethan Catt: "You ain't reason."

This year has been worse than ever. It's all bad news all the time in my house. My Real Job (tm) sucks the creativity out of me with more efficiency than a vampire with a straw. I haven't beaten that nasty little voice in the back of my head that says no one cares, your stories aren't that good, no one wants another RMXP game. When it feels like I'm working in a vacuum, it's worse, because it's an echo chamber of bad.

Smash the windows in the echo chamber. Find what stokes your fire, and feed it.

Am I typing all this out because I need to hear it myself? You bet I am.

How many times have I wanted to quit? At least once more, Miss Swann.

EDIT: oh goodness that got long. Tossing it under spoiler tags so no one has to scroll for 8000 years to get past it.
I'm sorry you had to go through that. However, you came out stronger for it, proving the nay sayers wrong.

I had a similar experience when someone said my art style looks too "anime" and I should try to make it more realistic. Then when I tried to make character designs for a game that was looking for an anime art style they said it looked to "cartoony". My art style is quite a weird place where its in the middle of anime and realistic so its not really a desireable style. So eventually I said, "you know what I am going to make my own game with my own art style." That led to the creation of my first game, "Path of the Martyrs."
 
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KazukiT

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Lost count actually. I get the urge to detach from game development very frequently. I'm a student so I don't really get much time in the first place to work on my project as much I want to. And aside from that, I procrastinate a lot. My main project is also something that personally, I think is impossible to do without a team. And me having trust issues and lack of willingness to cooperate with people doesn't help. I don't know... I just hate teamwork. I decided to do it myself. And the constant failure to do certain stuff really makes me demotivated and that's when I feel like nah, I should just step away. But game development is one of the more relaxing things I do every day so I stick around and work on side projects till I can muster the motivation to work on my main one. Also, coming up with solutions for problems that I encounter while developing my game allows me to train my brain logically which is pretty useful since I'm a cse student and I love to fiddle with problems like these. And last but not least, I make games because I love doing it. It makes me feel like I can do stuff most people can't. It makes me feel useful and productive. It's a hobby entirely and so I have no deadlines. I can always come back and pick up where I left off. So I don't lose hope and leave permanently.

@Alltheyurxzi Don't give up. Of course there are times like these... but if this is what you love, don't just leave. Keep working and hopefully, you'll reach a point where game development will become something very natural to you.
I’m somewhat similar to you where it’s hard to ask for help on games, I don’t have a problem asking people to play test my games though.
 

Ninjakillzu

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I haven't thought about quitting, but I do sometimes take long breaks where I don't even work on my projects. They can be days or even weeks before I start again. It depends if my creativity if feeling lively. Music helps a lot!
 

h0tWalker

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I've quit a lot of projects. Some cause I felt I was at a stand still and gave up on it, rather than develop it. Some cause I requires certain resources, but I'm not good at say art. Not being able to create the tilesets needed often ended my earlier projects. Still can't do it, but now I'm able to find work arounds. Limitations of my own capabilities is often what killed my projects.

Another thing I did when I started out years ago, was to look at creating a game as one goal. If that's the case, that one goal becomes pretty heavy on you. The best way to handle this is to break it into several goals. Break it down to categories of "Story", "Characters", "Music", "Mechanics" and then have sub-goals for those categories as well. Aim for small goals, rather than one big goal. It's refreshing and replenishes energy when you achieve one of these smaller milestones as you can see the progress, which in turn generates new motivation.

A great metaphor for this is the famous "Wall" that people have to overcome. While you have to find a way to get through it, it's kind of ironic that you should build it. A game requires a lot of small pieces, which is the bricks. You have to build a foundation that can hold the rest of the wall, and just like construction work, it's not made in one day. So it's important to take breaks and get breathing room.

Another thing I struggled with personally was originality. I studied game design back in the day, and one of our subjects were to develop our own projects, group and solo. My solo projects were always harassed by some people for being "silent hill" clones just because the people of a town was missing. This was a 3D project, and creating a NPC heavy game? Yeah, not gonna happen as a student. This eventually ruined my drive, and when I graduated I quit game design over all. I felt I had no creativity left cause I could not achieve "Originality".

However! Originality doesn't come from a setting, following a cliché like the hero saving the damsel in distress. It comes down to the journey, the character and how it's told. It doesn't matter if a concept is used, it's rough to be original, and it gets harder by the day. And even if it is similar, you can find a lot of games inspired by other games in turn that stands on it own, where the developer are open and say that it's based entirely of said game. Never let originality be an issue, cause it's not.

All this in turn takes us to the touchy subject of feedback. It's often taken in a negative way, and I'm not gonna go too much into this, but I've seen people quit due to taking critique or feedback in a negative way. I understand that people get sad, hurt or upset when people talk poorly about their creations. However, you need to find the right people for this. I have two people I ask for feedback, as I know they are interested in my projects. Meanwhile, most of my friends don't even know I work on projects at all, because they don't really give good feedback. I don't mind people trashing my projects, as long as I get constructive feedback to work with. If you feel a lack of this, there's plenty of people on the forums that will help you :)

The last thing I'll go into is loneliness. I've suffered from this myself, and seen others give in as well. If you work on a project alone, your gonna sit a bit isolated, and lacking conversations around the project. Some are better at solo projects than other, so it's important to find where you stand. For me, I have two friends I talk to in regards to my projects. One thing is sharing your idea and managing to talk about your project, which is important to me, it helps motivate me. It also gives me instant feedback and someone to discuss and question my choices. This usually turns into us discussing that character, town, etc. and even if the guy I talk with doesn't design games, he still helps create the character through or discussion and drafting. Even if we don't do any of this for weeks, just being able to talk about the project, or them asking or coming with a random suggestion or idea is a huge motivator for me. We're sorta like pack animals, so I think it's important to have someone that you can talk with regarding your projects, and perhaps even push you if they know you want to make it happen, but give up.

As for the amount of projects I've given up on? Over 10 across the years. These are my experiences I can recall at the top of my head, but there are of course several other reasons for qutting a project. Sometimes you just require a break, other times, you might need a motivational surge. And luckily, you got RPG Maker Web! The community consists of multiple helpful individuals with their own tips and tricks. Use them for what it's worth, I'm sure most of us want to help :D

And to close off the thread with a new question, this thread is called:
"How many times have you wanted to quit?"
What's the next question you'd like to ask? How do we deal with burnout? What do we do to reignite motivation? How do we structure our projects? Level with us at your experience so far, why are you feeling like giving in?

Hope this have been of some help, figured I'd type out my experienced in the hopes that they might help you :)

Edit: Compress it a bit to not make it a novel for people to scroll past

@TeiRaven yea, I also had a shocking time during my game design studies, except I just quit immediately, I admire that you went through the internship. And heck yea I want more XP games, thats the engine I worked with till MZ, and what initially dragged me from game maker to RPG Maker :D
 
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KazukiT

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I've quit a lot of projects. Some cause I felt I was at a stand still and gave up on it, rather than develop it. Some cause I requires certain resources, but I'm not good at say art. Not being able to create the tilesets needed often ended my earlier projects. Still can't do it, but now I'm able to find work arounds. Limitations of my own capabilities is often what killed my projects.

Another thing I did when I started out years ago, was to look at creating a game as one goal. If that's the case, that one goal becomes pretty heavy on you. The best way to handle this is to break it into several goals. Break it down to categories of "Story", "Characters", "Music", "Mechanics" and then have sub-goals for those categories as well. Aim for small goals, rather than one big goal. It's refreshing and replenishes energy when you achieve one of these smaller milestones as you can see the progress, which in turn generates new motivation.

A great metaphor for this is the famous "Wall" that people have to overcome. While you have to find a way to get through it, it's kind of ironic that you should build it. A game requires a lot of small pieces, which is the bricks. You have to build a foundation that can hold the rest of the wall, and just like construction work, it's not made in one day. So it's important to take breaks and get breathing room.

Another thing I struggled with personally was originality. I studied game design back in the day, and one of our subjects were to develop our own projects, group and solo. My solo projects were always harassed by some people for being "silent hill" clones just because the people of a town was missing. This was a 3D project, and creating a NPC heavy game? Yeah, not gonna happen as a student. This eventually ruined my drive, and when I graduated I quit game design over all. I felt I had no creativity left cause I could not achieve "Originality".

However! Originality doesn't come from a setting, following a cliché like the hero saving the damsel in distress. It comes down to the journey, the character and how it's told. It doesn't matter if a concept is used, it's rough to be original, and it gets harder by the day. And even if it is similar, you can find a lot of games inspired by other games in turn that stands on it own, where the developer are open and say that it's based entirely of said game. Never let originality be an issue, cause it's not.

All this in turn takes us to the touchy subject of feedback. It's often taken in a negative way, and I'm not gonna go too much into this, but I've seen people quit due to taking critique or feedback in a negative way. I understand that people get sad, hurt or upset when people talk poorly about their creations. However, you need to find the right people for this. I have two people I ask for feedback, as I know they are interested in my projects. Meanwhile, most of my friends don't even know I work on projects at all, because they don't really give good feedback. I don't mind people trashing my projects, as long as I get constructive feedback to work with. If you feel a lack of this, there's plenty of people on the forums that will help you :)

The last thing I'll go into is loneliness. I've suffered from this myself, and seen others give in as well. If you work on a project alone, your gonna sit a bit isolated, and lacking conversations around the project. Some are better at solo projects than other, so it's important to find where you stand. For me, I have two friends I talk to in regards to my projects. One thing is sharing your idea and managing to talk about your project, which is important to me, it helps motivate me. It also gives me instant feedback and someone to discuss and question my choices. This usually turns into us discussing that character, town, etc. and even if the guy I talk with doesn't design games, he still helps create the character through or discussion and drafting. Even if we don't do any of this for weeks, just being able to talk about the project, or them asking or coming with a random suggestion or idea is a huge motivator for me. We're sorta like pack animals, so I think it's important to have someone that you can talk with regarding your projects, and perhaps even push you if they know you want to make it happen, but give up.

As for the amount of projects I've given up on? Over 10 across the years. These are my experiences I can recall at the top of my head, but there are of course several other reasons for qutting a project. Sometimes you just require a break, other times, you might need a motivational surge. And luckily, you got RPG Maker Web! The community consists of multiple helpful individuals with their own tips and tricks. Use them for what it's worth, I'm sure most of us want to help :D

And to close off the thread with a new question, this thread is called:
"How many times have you wanted to quit?"
What's the next question you'd like to ask? How do we deal with burnout? What do we do to reignite motivation? How do we structure our projects? Level with us at your experience so far, why are you feeling like giving in?

Hope this have been of some help, figured I'd type out my experienced in the hopes that they might help you :)

Edit: Compress it a bit to not make it a novel for people to scroll past

@TeiRaven yea, I also had a shocking time during my game design studies, except I just quit immediately, I admire that you went through the internship. And heck yea I want more XP games, thats the engine I worked with till MZ, and what initially dragged me from game maker to RPG Maker :D
As for originality, I learned early on that no concept in the world will make you game or project unique, its how you execute your ideas. I also dealt with loneliness because I also develop games on my own, I occasionally talk to my brother about it and he gives me some feedback. Feedback no matter how much I steel myself the bad one still sting a little however, the comments that are actual critiques feel helpful even if there are some things I messed up on. Burnout, that is something that is a struggle for me because I just go full blaze, but I keep reminding myself if I want to make a quality game I have to sometimes pace myself.
 

cthulhusquid

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I've never actually quit, but I've had many breaks both short and long. Low creativity, the weight of all of the work you have to do, or even just being tired when you get home from work can be enough to stall development. With three active projects, even the smallest database edit or brainstorming session can feel like an insurmountable wall.

@KazukiT
My brother and I are both RPG maker devs. In fact, he's replied in this thread already.
 

KazukiT

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I've never actually quit, but I've had many breaks both short and long. Low creativity, the weight of all of the work you have to do, or even just being tired when you get home from work can be enough to stall development. With three active projects, even the smallest database edit or brainstorming session can feel like an insurmountable wall.

@KazukiT
My brother and I are both RPG maker devs. In fact, he's replied in this thread already.
My brother isn't an RPG Maker dev but we like similar games and grew up playing video games so he has some insight on what make them tick.
 

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