Dankovsky

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As an extra bonus, I've got a little review of RPG Maker (and RPG Maker-ish) games that actually sold good, well, or exceptional:

1) Undertale
It's an extremely memetic story with amusing writing, absolutely adorable characters and perfect feels, multiplied by amazing music. These games happen once in a lifetime, unfortunately.

2) To the Moon (series)
Entirely story-focused adventure work that's not even an RPG. If you're an Nobel literature laureat, this is your path to take.

3) LiEat
It has custom likeable art style and loveable characters with short and cute stories, and is pretty well written and sold for humble amount.

4) LISA
It stands out as a game that breaks your expectations and conventions, with a honest, brutal and dark story. The definition of good hooks and writing.

5) OneShot
Non-combat title with lovable protagonist, feels and hooky story, also great visual style.

6) Mad Father
It's a catchy horror adventure that's just well designed and has a likeable protagonist and hooky story.

7) Rakuen
Custom art non-combat adventure story with feels. See a pattern yet?

8) I forgot its name but you'll know it when you'll see it
It's a parody RPG with a very relatable premise and lots of outdated nerd humour.

What's sad/fun about it is that only one of those games is a fantasy RPG, and even then it's a comedy game.
Also note that most of those games were released pre-apocalypse. And also...

9) Dark Elf & other porn games

I mean I could write a moral here but I think it's pretty obvious.
(the moral is to do your market research before you try to make any commercial game)
 

rue669

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I would also just add that RPG Maker, until relatively recently, has always been a HOBBY game engine, not an engine used to commercialize games. That’s really been a recent phenomenon.

And because of the oversaturated market, you need to find a way to stand out. And, unfortunately, the visuals of the game will be the first impression of a buyer. So you need to stand out from that perspective.

Making a game with RTP is hard enough. Making a commercially viable game is extremely difficult. That’s not to say it can’t happen—it certainly can, but not without a lot of work and headaches.

What I would say is—rpg maker is a hobby. Even if you commercialize your game, keep your expectations low. And if you want to take commercialisation seriously—think like a business and do your marketing homework (which is a lot of investment, both time and money, and a lot of trial and error) before you even put your game up for sale.
 

bgillisp

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I've done the same research and honestly...there are RTP heavy games that sell well, and custom assets games that sell barely 1000 copies. There are other factors at work. @Tuomo L 's games have a huge use of RTP from what I can see (mixed with DLC assets) and he sells over 1000 copies of his games easily.

I think the main thing we all forget is in about any market, not many games make it. Back in the 80's, many studios worked on 8 - 10 projects at once. Usually they expected 1 of them to sell really well, 1 - 2 might do decent, and the others they expected to flop or only find a niche audience. In fact, all interviews I'd read with the famous 80's/90's developers said that they and their company honestly expected 10% of their games to do well. But the revenue from those 10% funded the rest of the games.

Can we make 10 or so games and hope one of them is a hit? Maybe. Though not if we do everything custom, else our projects will take as long as Grimore (23 years to make). In fact, I have yet to see a developer here who says everything must be 100% custom who is working by themselves finish a single game in the 4 years I've been here. Now, if you outsource it or get a team, then I've seen it happen, but trying to do all the art, music, plot, eventing, and scripting all by yourself is an invite to never finish the project, and in that case, you will get 0 sales.
 

Dankovsky

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I've done the same research and honestly...there are RTP heavy games that sell well, and custom assets games that sell barely 1000 copies. There are other factors at work. @Tuomo L 's games have a huge use of RTP from what I can see (mixed with DLC assets) and he sells over 1000 copies of his games easily.

I think the main thing we all forget is in about any market, not many games make it. Back in the 80's, many studios worked on 8 - 10 projects at once. Usually they expected 1 of them to sell really well, 1 - 2 might do decent, and the others they expected to flop or only find a niche audience. In fact, all interviews I'd read with the famous 80's/90's developers said that they and their company honestly expected 10% of their games to do well. But the revenue from those 10% funded the rest of the games.

Can we make 10 or so games and hope one of them is a hit? Maybe. Though not if we do everything custom, else our projects will take as long as Grimore (23 years to make). In fact, I have yet to see a developer here who says everything must be 100% custom who is working by themselves finish a single game in the 4 years I've been here. Now, if you outsource it or get a team, then I've seen it happen, but trying to do all the art, music, plot, eventing, and scripting all by yourself is an invite to never finish the project, and in that case, you will get 0 sales.
I understand where you're coming from, but I think "making 10 games and hoping one will be a hit" is a very faulty way to be an indie developer.

You don't just make a game and hope it will be a hit. Unless the game hits the minimal requirements for a sellable game (visuals, hook, gameplay), there is simply no chance it will be a hit, no matter if you make 1, 10 or 100 games.

I can of course agree that visuals can't simply make a bad game good.
And I know that some RPG Maker games have sold more than 1k copies - but how many have sold more than 10k? In 2017-2018.
You'll notice in my list of successful games I've mostly listed the ones that sold 100k copies and up, which is what you can consider truly commercially successful.

I know its plain cruel to request any RPG Maker developer to make fully custom assets and I wouldn't do it, but if you're going commercial in 2018 I think we just need to understand that an RTP game will most likely sell less than 1000 copies.

But frankly it's not about having 100% custom assets. It's about making a unique visual style for the game and making it stand out. If you can do it with RTP (it would be quite a challenge) or by combining RTP with custom assets, even free ones (like big Kaduki busts in Tuomo's games), your chances improve a lot. But if you ask yourself the question "does this look like another RPG Maker game?" and the honest answer is "yes", then
that's probably bad news for your sales numbers.
 

Henryetha

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Rue mentioned some good points.

Myself I am a steam player with a large library and I frequently check the Steam Store for possible games to buy.
And to be honest, yes, your game might be good and I believe, alot of effort and money is spent - yet still.. I'd just click next.

The problem is how it is presented.

The description is boring to read - I'm sorry to say.
1. Avoid words which require some non-english speakers to use a dictionary to understand them. Steam is an international platform; many countries haven't the same educational standards as in Europe. Besides this there are also people who simply struggle with English. You're not writing a professional review of the game nor for a specific magazine - you're trying to catch the player's attention. You won't, if the player doesn't know the expressions you're using.
2. Avoid writing the same obvious stuff written in the other 10.000 games on steam.
3. Why describe the game as a roleplaying game? It's a waste of reading time and space in the description. The tags already say, it's an RPG. The tags also say "RPG Maker". It's kinda obvious, the game is a roleplaying game.
4. Build some suspense in the description. Don't analyze the game, just give a peek on its content and make the player curious, for example by ending with a question: "Can the universe still be saved?"

-------------------------------

"The fully realized worlds of Water, Fire, Earth, Air, and Spirit await you in a new adventure! Enter the five elemental planets!

You are one of the Dark Ones, a Light-hungering ghostly being dwelling in the world of Spirit. Your mission is to explore and conquer each one of the alien elemental worlds...

...and regain your long-lost Light."


Now this one is much more exciting to read than the other one on the top. The player will read the other one first tho. It's more important to catch his attention right there than later under "About the game.." - because at this point it's already too late if a bunch of possible players already lost interest.

The video could be more exciting.
1. Some additional sound effects at the begin can build suspense, like a pulsing sound (or a heartbeat); especially while blending in certain texts or scenes. I like the sounds later on, but a majority of players might stop paying attention at this point already.
2. The showed scenes make the impression of a fast play through the game. Less is more. If you look at the trailer of "To the Moon" it focusses on catching the player emotionally and like this it successfully draws the attention and makes the player curious about the story.

Overthink the screenshots selected.
1. You added 4(!) Screenshots of the FV battlescreen. And I understand, you probably want to show interesting content on each of them. But practically it won't be the case and it rather works contra-productive. Leave the player some room for imagination, something to look forward to and be curious about the game. You're taking away all the excitement. Again - you're not reviewing or analyzing. You want to present the game. One is enough, max 2.
2. I guess, you intented with the last screenshot to introduce a game mechanic. However, there's not enough information to make this catch the player's attention. And visually it's not outstanding. If it was me, I'd remove it, but that's your choice after all.


Well, just trying to help here, so please don't take it personally.
 

bgillisp

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True, we don't have the time to make 10 games usually. Unless we shove out 10 asset flips using all default maps and databases, then maybe. But the point is, they expected many of them to fail. They hoped for the best, but they planned for the worst. I think that is the lesson we need to take away from this.

So in my opinion, when starting out, only spend on your game(s) what you can afford to lose. In my case, I went and taught an extra night class for a couple of semesters, and earned the money for my game that way. It's extra money, and money that I didn't need elsewhere. So if I end up making a whopping $97 in the end, I at least will not be bankrupt from it as I still got my main job and the bills are still paid and food is still on the table.
 

Labyrinthine

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@Rue 669 and for some other people complaining about stuff:
1.You think I haven't tried different prices? I asked about 3- 4 euros originally and it didn't do any better. It's because the market exploded. Bgillisp is right about this.

2. The 2 negative reviews on the Steam site are from people who a) played it 5 minutes and failed to defeat the very first enemy despite clear instructions in-battle. So, he gave a negative review for 5 minutes of gameplay, for a game that lasts approximately 80 hours. The other one got farther, but misunderstood the concept, He quit the game because he thought he would lose his characters, not being able to level them in the end game. This is just false, speculation not based on anything but his wrong expectations. Almost all characters can be leveled in the end game up to lvl 99. In other words, he was wrong. So much for these negative "reviews."

3. Steam is not the only place I've released the game. It's also sold on Aldorlea. Once again, everyone who played the game through gave glowing reviews (if some of you read this, love you guys and thank you for playing the game <3)

4. About the free copies, you're probably right about that. I should give some for free. Never done that, because I'm kind of afraid some haters would just slam the page full of negative reviews, not even playing it and just because it's an RPG Maker game.

5. As for the logo, it's done. It may be simplistic, but I can't for the life of me figure out anything more suitable. You have a point there, though, and you're not the first person mentioning about this.

6. As for the progression, it is really unprecedented, because no other game (I know about) has progression like that. It might be hard to understand exactly why, especially for people who haven't even played the game. But people these days seem to know awfully lot about games they haven't even touched.

I have no idea why some people are so negative towards some games on this forum. To be honest, if you've got nothing more than negative things to say about a game you haven't even played, rather just say nothing. I'm not here to put you guys down either, even if your game was a 3 hour long adventure about a knight saving a princess using only stock materials. Shouldn't we support each other in this forum?

P.S. You know what was the worst? Some person claimed that I had created a fake account to create a false positive review for my game. Well, it wasn't me. That review was later erased (so - 1 positive "masterpiece" review for me), and I suspect it was because some paranoid schizophrenic was complaining. I have honor when it comes to game making. I'd rather take an honest, negative review than a false positive one, and I would never write a review about my own game.
 

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@Labyrinthine : Good points there. I personally wish that people would at least be constructive on feedback. Maybe you don't like a game, but try to say WHY and what you think should be changed to help it out. From there it is up to the developer to decide if they want to act on the advise or not.

As for the idea on key give-aways, why not see if @Studio Blue or @HawkZombie will review your game if you give them a key? They focus on RPGMaker games. But make sure if you do key give-aways you focus on those who play those kind of games and have an audience who wants to see those kind of games. So Jim Sterling might be a waste of time as I'm not sure his audience cares about RPGMaker games, but those two I mentioned might be worth a shot.
 

rue669

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Labyrinthine, none of my comments were meant to be viewed negatively. I’m sorry that you saw it that way. In fact, the purpose for my comments was to empower you to think about marketing as a business owner selling a product. To me, that is being supportive.

I apologize that I am not partaking in what everyone seems to be doing and that is “blaming the market!!” when there is clear evidence that indie games do make high sales and obtain a good level of success. They are in the same market.

I don’t want you—or any other rpg maker developer—to give up or be bitter because of the market. I would much rather give you options to consider and test out and find success. Again, that’s supportive, not negative.

There is a great lack of marketing advice in the indie game sphere. Perhaps together, as a forum testing out strategies, we can all come up with worthwhile marketing methods to increase our chances of success. But it won’t get there if we are too sensitive. I get it—you spent a lot of time and effort on your game and it’s “your baby” but you will never succeed in the creative business unless you’re willing to take advice.

At no point in my comments did I criticize your game. At no point did I say “your game sucks”. I have not played your game so I can’t make any comment on it. I only criticized your sales page (which is your first impression) that is available for all to see. If you can point out where I have said your game sucks in my comments, I will gladly remove it from my post.

None of my comments or suggestions are divine law, but is my opinion based on my perspective. Take it as you will.
 

Henryetha

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I must say, it's kind of frustrating, to spend time, trying to help someone - precious time, because I'm sure, everyone of us is quite busy - and the try to help is devalued as a "complaint".
And tho I understand the frustration, it annoys me, when that precious time is wasted like this.

Better only ask for advice, if you like to hear the answer.

Also it doesn't matter what people say who played the game, because they already bought it.
But "people who haven't even played the game" are the important. You are aiming to exactly these people if you want to sell your game.

Anyway.. if you're basically looking for encouragement, I suggest you edit your post.
(up to you, but you'd avoid getting yourself and others frustrated)
 

lianderson

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Facebook has a marketing system. I haven't used it myself, but I'm sure it's worth looking into. Yeah, it'll cost some money, but you can drop a small amount and see how it goes.
 

Labyrinthine

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People who complained about the logo. Look at Undertale's logo. It's even more simple, but the game still sold well.
Undertale was released before that big explosion of Steam indie games, the same period when my first, modest games sold more than a million combined. Who knows how well it would do today?
 

Sharm

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The quality of a logo has nothing to do with simplicity but everything to do with efficacy. It has to say a lot with very little, so you have to know a lot about design or have good artistic instincts to make really good logo. The Nike swoosh logo is a good example of this concept. It's super simple but it is instantly recognizable at any size, and the shape of it implies motion, proactiveness, aggression, and power. It does this through careful use of shape, color, and symbolism. Undertale's logo is also effective, it tells us a lot about the game through font choice, artistic style, color, contrast, positive/negative space, and symbolism. Both of them are also visually appealing.

I have no current opinion of your game whatsoever, so I just looked up the logo to give you my opinion on it. Let's see. . . . To me it says it was made by a non-artist, the setting is Sci-Fi with minor steampunk elements, the overall mood is basically cheerful, perhaps aimed at tweens, gameplay is navigating mazes, using color is a key element of the story aaaand, you like swirls? The swirl is the symbol of someone important? It's not meshing together as a whole very well and isn't very attractive. So, was I close? What did you actually want it to say?

When it comes to the question of "How should I advertise my game" I think "Revise the logo" is a fair answer. If you haven't sold many copies you won't be risking the loss of brand identity by changing it.
 

Labyrinthine

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Originally I got a lot of positive feedback from the logo. You did check the full logo with the 5 elemental symbols and the golden text/spiral, right? Do you know what a golden key is? About the five elemental symbols? The meaning of a spiral? The logo is fully occult material which is a key aspect of the game, and the layout of the symbols etc. is very carefully planned. The logo depicts what you get from the game, simply said. There's nothing extra on it. I'm sorry if it's not not understood by everyone, or dissed only because of the herd hatred general mentality this thread has dived in.

You say this logo is "not made by artist." Then again, Undertale's pixelated simplicity is? I think the only reason you prefer Undertale's logo is that you've played that game which is why you understand it better.

Labyronia Elements will sell better if I get a single more known youtuber to review it. And even if it wouldn't, it already has at least a small cult following of people who enjoyed it, which is always better than nothing.

Just in case, this is the real logo and the title screen of the game:

vjvrRtn.png
 
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Sharm

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Oh well. I guess my response will be for anyone else reading the thread who would like to know more about this stuff.

The purpose of your logo is to communicate things without words, so it doesn't really matter if there is deep meaning if that meaning is hidden. Logos are advertising, so I think it's better not to get too attached to the idea of the logo being a distillation of your game. It's not about what your game is, it's what you want people to think your game is. Instead of being about the whole, it's about communicating to your potential buyers what makes your game fun and unique. So it doesn't matter if I as an individual know the occult meaning of a spiral. If the general public doesn't know the meaning of something on an instinctual level, or if knowing that meaning doesn't make your game look fun and interesting, then the logo has failed. That occult meaning is pretty much a different language, it's not useful here.

Studying design is a way of transfering instinctual knowledge into active knowledge where it can be used to our benefit to get the reaction we want from other people. It's why good designers can charge a lot of money even if they're just choosing one shade of one color for a logo, it's a hard won skill to know and to execute well. I don't think most people need to hire a high end designer for a game logo though. Depending on your own skills just a good general artist or learning a few design principles yourself will do. Going in blind is a good way to accidentally say something you don't intend to say, though.

As for the matter of feedback, you've got to be very careful with how you're asking for it and how you interpret the information you get. Asking someone "Hey, I made this logo, what do you think?" is going to get a very different response from "Hey, based on just this logo, would you buy this game?" For one thing, by making the question personal, you're less likely to get a person's real thoughts. They'll adjust what they say based on either their opinion of you or how they want you to see them. However, removing yourself from the question entirely takes that away, and you're more likely to get real opinions, so a higher percentage will be negative. Basically, by asking in the right way it's about the work and not about you. For another thing, just asking "what do you think?" isn't requiring much judgement from the person whose opinion you're asking. It's just a simple "Yep, it's cool" or "Eh, not my thing". The lack of pressure actually makes a person less likely to be detailed or accurate, since both require more thought to properly voice and as such are more work. But asking people to put money on the line, even imaginary money towards a hypothetical situation, forces them to be more engaged in the question and what they will answer. Labyrinthine has bowed out of the conversation so we probably won't know for certain, but my guess is that those early responses to the logo were to a question more like my first hypothetical, and asking "How should I advertise my game" puts it more towards the second style.

It's important to understand that negative feedback isn't necessarily bad. In fact, negative feedback is often far more useful, and tells you more about both what actually is working, what's really not, and if you pay close attention, sometimes it will even tell you why. As a human who loves the things I create I have a really hard time getting negative feedback, but as an artist who constantly wants to improve and grow, it's the very best kind.

I feel like defending my position of the logo critique a little, so I'm going to go point by point and explain why I had the thoughts I did about the logo in question. I hope this will be useful to someone. It got a bit long so I put it in a spoiler tag.

  • made by a non-artist
This part is pretty straightforward. The coloring is uneven and the resolution of the piece when made was set too low. These are both things an artist would be used to dealing with overcoming. There are other elements a good artist would have also never used, but they'll be discussed later.
  • the setting is Sci-Fi
Purely a font issue. If you study typography, you'll pick up on a few patterns. Boxy sans serif fonts are often a sci-fi thing, especially the detached cross point of the E of the second font. This has a lot to do with when certain font styles were invented. Now it's a visual shorthand.
  • with minor steampunk elements
This wasn't as strong, so if that isn't intended, it's not a big worry. The main colors of the logo were copper and black, which are typically associated with steampunk, plus the swirl had a beaten metal look. Since the font said so loudly that it wasn't a steampunk setting primarily, I figured it might be a lesser element of the setting.
  • the overall mood is basically cheerful, perhaps aimed at tweens
Font and color choices. All of the colors are quite vibrant and there are a lot of them. The fonts are both serif, which is more common in things made for children. The top font has a whimsical element to it's design. The lower one, although boxy, has very rounded edges. The swirl's coloring is somewhat detailed but the actual design of it is very iconized, like a cartoon. The combination of these elements make it look young and playful. There is a monochrome element to the non-rainbow portion, implying a seriousness, but even that color is very bright and pure in hue, which negates that serious nature a bit. Together it implies a safe place to explore more serious elements, like you might find in a story for tweens.
  • gameplay is navigating mazes
The on the nose nature of the first font makes this overly obvious. I actually think a more subtle design would work better here.
  • using color is a key element of the story
Well, why else would you have . . . what is it, 11 colors? Why else would you have so many in your logo of all places. Again, too on the nose, needs some subtlety.
  • The swirl is the symbol of someone important
The only reason I could think to add a swirl on top of all those other way on the nose parts of the logo was because the swirl was super important and would be seen often in the actual game for some reason.
  • It's not meshing together as a whole very well
There is absolutely nothing tying the elements together. None of the parts overlap, none of them interact with each other, there is no unifying design element, no color they all share or matching outline, there is no spacing cleverness that tells a story with arrangement, nothing at all. Worst of all, two fonts in one logo! Logos should have exactly one font unless using multiple fonts is telling a story about your game all by themselves through their opposing natures. Since the two fonts say very similar things, this is very clearly not the case here. Also, a thing to keep in mind is that adding multiple fonts to a logo makes it much, much harder to do advertising, because you shouldn't be using more than three fonts in any one page/advertisement/ect. or else it's taxing on the reader. If you want the logo to stand out at all from the rest of the text on the page you have the use of only one font for the entire thing.
  • isn't very attractive
The layout is very bland, left alignment is how you align mundain texts in english, nothing dynamic about the spacing, the placement of the symbol is like a bullet point. In fact, the alignment is a really great way to make something look like a boring business presentation. Everything is leaning left, which makes it unbalanced, but not unbalanced enough to be clearly on purpose or pleasant. It just looks . . . wrong. Add to that the low quality resolution, the unharmonious elements, the mash of too many colors and fonts as mentioned before and it just isn't attractive. It could be attractive with a little proper arrangement (for storytelling and interest) and streamlining of the disparate elements (to get rid of anything unnecessary and unify them).

Well, that's what I have to say about this matter. I hope someone finds it entertaining at least.
 
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Just in case, this is the real logo and the title screen of the game:

vjvrRtn.png

Im not going to rip into this logo (or title screen) but I will bring up a couple of issues I have with the design. These are general design rules that apply to all forms of graphic design, not just for gaming.

- Labyronia is written in a font that is hard to read, its already a word 99% of your audience wont be familiar with, and then the fact it is written in a font that is so busy with outlines and inlines makes it even harder to make out, this means whats is potentially the most important aspect of your logo leaves a bad first impression for a viewer.
- Elements is also hard to read due to not just the number of colors found accross it but due to the fact each color is a gradient. Generally almost all logos are designed in black and white and if any color is added to them its always at the end and usually no more than 1 or 2 colors tops, these colors are usually put in place to highlight a single element. I know you are trying to convey information about the games narrative with these colors which is admirable but its a missguided design choice, especially when you have the 5 shapes representing the elements which could have been incorporated more into the logo and would have worked really well even without color.
- Theres no harmony between the font for Labyronia and the font for Elements, instead of complimenting each other they clash with each one fighting for your eyes attention.
- A general issue with the title screen is that it has 5 different fonts between the logos, instructions in the bottom left and the UI. Generally speaking you want a max of 3 for legibility.
- I like the idea of spirals, but I stylistically the one you have used clashes with the words beside it. I think something a little more stylised (like the dreamcast logo) would have been a little more harmonic.

In the end I think the general elements found on this title screen are fine on their own, but they dont really come together to make a cohesive whole, theres no visual language uniting all of these elements. Its not the worst title screen I have seen by any means, and there is a lot of obvious thought that has gone into it, but I think a lot more could have been done to make these standalone elements harmonic.
 

Labyrinthine

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The spiral in essence is the main character of the entire series, and the symbols represent the five colorful elemental worlds the player travels through. The font is labyrinthine because there are labyrinths in the game. So, every part of o the logo is meaningful taking account the content. I don't see issues with the resolution so it's either my perfect eyesight is not working or someone is paying too much attention to something that's not really there or meaningful enough.
The rest of it is just your opinions, and there are as many opinions as there are people.
It sounds what you're after is ABSOLUTE PERFECTION. Unfortunately I haven't got 10 years to design a logo like that.
 
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The spiral in essence is the main character of the entire series, and the symbols represent the five colorful elemental worlds the player travels through. The font is labyrinthine because there are labyrinths in the game. So, every part of o the logo is meaningful taking account the content. I don't see issues with the resolution so it's either my perfect eyesight is not working or someone is paying too much attention to something that's not really there or meaningful enough.
The rest of it is just your opinions, and there are as many opinions as there are people.
It sounds what you're after is ABSOLUTE PERFECTION. Unfortunately I haven't got 10 years to design a logo like that.

Cant help people that dont want to help themselves I guess.

Ah well, I tried.

¯\_(ツ)_/¯
 

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@Labyrinthine : I'd suggest hiring someone then. I got someone to do a basic title logo for $20 for my game.

As it is, I'd say I have two concerns about the game from the initial glance at the store page on Steam.

1) The logo is a slight issue, yes. You say it has a purpose, but is the player who has not bought the game going to know that? Odds are that is a big no. So go for something that looks good and appeals to the eye of someone who has not played the game, not something with deep art significance that might make sense after 40 hours of playing.

2) The screenshots bothered me a little. The facesets looked to similar to the character generator, which is usually associated with a bad game. Now I don't think it was the generator but it had a generator like style which still sends out a slightly negative vibe to people.

Now the thing to keep in mind is this: You get one shot to make an impression with a buyer. So yes, that means your store page needs to be as close to perfect as you can make it. You need your logo to be as good as it can be. The screenshots need to be the best you got to show, and that includes your best graphics. Sure, we aren't going to wow those who want graphics which match FF, but we do need to put our best foot forward with the store page, and the reason is, if buyers only see average or worse there, they will assume that was the best you had and the game will be worse than that, and will usually not buy, especially not in this market when there are 7000+ games released every year.
 

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