How to: finish a project

Discussion in 'General Discussion' started by Indrah, Jan 30, 2015.

  1. Indrah

    Indrah Megane Berserker Veteran

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    How to: finish a project
     
    Hello everyone! This is Indrah, if you don't know me or haven't seen my stuff around before, I can summarize it all as "I've made a buncha games even though I'm kind of an idiot." With that out of the way, I've been wanting to make some "advice" articles for a while. They're not exactly tutorials or super-detailed, but I feel I've been around enough I can give some nice pointers.
    Now, everything I say here is based on my experience and coloured by my own opinions, so there may be things you don't agree with, which is fine. Just keep in mind this is a general sort of advice and your mileage may vary.
     
    If all goes well (and by that I mean if I remember to actually keep making these) this will be a small miniseries of articles about how to tackle various aspects of game making on a broader level: how to get stuff finished, how to deal with feedback, how to work in teams, etc; rather than dealing with very specific aspects (mapping/scripting/etc).
     

    ----------------------------------------

    Today's subject:

    FINISHING A PROJECT

    This seems to be the number one thing the vast majority of people struggle with, as nearly everyone in the forum has at least SOME idea of a game they want to make, but few ever get it done. I'm going to be aiming this more at people who have NOT finished a project before, since those who've already cranked multiple games out usually have a method.
     
     
    So! The first thing you will need to finish a project is to HAVE a project. And I feel it's important we address a couple points most people have when it comes to "I'm going to make a game".

    SCOPE IS EXTREMELY IMPORTANT!
     ​
    Do not aim to make epic 40 hour games or the next Final Fantasy. Always remember that level of game size comes with a paid team of 40~ people, and you're just you and maybe some friends making a game in your spare time. As such, and especially for your first project(s), try to keep your game's scope as small as possible.
    I know everyone dreams of their perfect project, with all those great ideas in their head, but the simple truth is that ideas are easy and execution is EVERYTHING, and you will not have the skills, time or money required for such complex games at the beginning.
     

    So, onward to finishing that project! Imagine I'm a newbie and I just got the program. After tinkering for a period of time (it could be a week or two years, doesn't matter) I finally decide I want to push a game out, for real this time! So I come up with some ideas for my game, make some plans, and then...
     
    +Step 1: Reduce the game's scope as much as possible.
    Again, the scope of a game is vital. Always scale DOWN, never up. Many projects get bogged down and stop from the scope creeping in, slowly getting bigger as time goes on and you add more ideas until it becomes impossible to handle. If necessary, always take stuff AWAY.
    Keep in mind what the core of your game is: a really compelling story, an engaging gameplay mechanic, etc. Aim to make that aspect shine, rather than feel compelled to just add to it. I can't stress enough how easy it is, even to developers who're good at finishing games, to mess up when it comes to the scope of a game or padding it unnecessarily. (I will address this further in “How to make a GOOD game” at a later point, so hold on to that.)
    And if you ever feel bad about planning for a short game, know this: people will NOT sit through a bad game for a long time. When you're starting out, your best bet is to make an engaging, short product. In fact, many people in the community PREFER shorter games. There are those who prefer longer ones, of course, but when starting out especially it's better to aim for short, since there's more control over the content and quality.
     
    +Step 2: Organize and keep track of your work.
    A list does the trick. and keep it handy and updated. It works and is very encouraging to see the progress you make, as well as helping you keep a good grasp of how much work you have left.
    For extra effect, divide general tasks into several smaller points, as many as you can imagine. It feels much better to cross out a bunch of tasks daily than just cross out “mapping the game” once after a long time.
     
    +Step 3: Work.
    There is no getting around this, to finish a game of any kind it will require you to work on it, quite probably well past the level you expected and enjoy. At some point you will have to just grit your teeth and grind through a task you don't like, especially if it's an RPG, since the genre tackles a lot of different aspects you would not expect.
    If you ever become sick of working, take a short break (but DO NOT start other projects, believe me) and then come back. If you get utterly stuck in a specific point, leave it alone until the next day if necessary to take some distance.
     
    +Step 4: Do NOT revamp your game before it's complete
    It's very easy, especially starting out, to have the impulse to just scrap the project and build it up again from the ground up, with the perfectly reasonable logic of “Well, I've learned a lot while I made this and now I could do it SO much better!”
    No. Don't do this, please. Many projects get lost in this cycle. No game will ever be perfect, especially the first one you make. Push past this impulse and get the game DONE. It's one thing to adjust things because a mechanic changed and then you must revise the game again, but remaking everything will just destroy your progress and eventually your motivation. Trust me, just GO and finish the game.
     
    +Step 5: Don't give up.
    The longer you spend making a game, the easier it is to get tired of it.
    There are usually two keys points where developers face the crisis of “gah, I want to quit”: first is the “initial enthusiasm has burned out” phase, where your starting energy has left and you only have the grind before you; and the other is right in the last stages of development, where the unfun stuff that is final tweaking, balancing and testing, rear their ugly heads. Again, these are things that are necessary but not very enjoyable. Take heart that you're almost there and grind past it.
     
    +Step 6: LET GO of the game.
    When a game is nearly done, especially if you're of a perfectionist sort, it's easy to get into this “I must improve things/make it perfect/it can STILL be better!” vibe. Please, just let it go.
    It's fine to check things once or twice before release but you'd be surprised of how much this perfectionism (in all stages of game development, not just the end) can hurt you.
    Remember, people can't play your game unless you put it out there. Finish the game and let it go.
     

    ----------------------------------------

     
    Yay, the project is finished! You're tired but exultant. You make a topic and upload the game for other people to play. Congratulations, you've finished the game! Now you can finally have people play it and maybe get some feedback!
     
    You probably think this all sounded waaaaaay too easy, right? It's true the steps above are very simple to understand, but much harder to execute. Additionally I have a whole slew of points I want to make that are more general advice than specific steps, so here we go:
     
    -Keep it simple.
    This goes multiplied by 1000 for first projects especially. Keeping it simple is the best advice everyone is going to give you when it comes to first games. The simpler the game, the more focused you can be about it, it will get done quicker and allow for more confidence when you successfully get past learning stages in the process.
     
    -Don't be ashamed of using stock resources or asking for help.
    I know the RTP resources carry this big stigma with them, but if it comes to using them or nothing, don't be ashamed. Games are all about the EXECUTION of concepts. It doesn't matter how fancy an idea looks on paper, if it plays badly it's not going to be enjoyable anyway.
    You can also see the use of stock resources as an interesting limit. Working within limitations is good in the sense that it promotes originality and adaptability, so when it comes to early projects that is not a bad thing.
    And of course, don't hesitate to ask for help. If you cannot find the matter you're having trouble with yourself by searching the help files or the internet, simply ask the community. As long as you're clear on your question and polite, people will be happy to help you along. It's only when people act entitled or rude that there's a problem.
     
    -Work on your strengths and reduce your weak points.
    Don't make your first game feature prominently aspects you cannot handle. If you cannot code, skip out on complex scripting systems. If you cannot write, don't base your game on dialog. Always focus your game on what you CAN do well, while taking away the importance of aspects you're not good at.
    Example: if you're good at gameplay but cannot handle dialog, look into puzzle based or roguelike games. If you can do art and writing but can't do gameplay at all, consider visual novel or adventure style games. Try to fit your skills into the game, and don't be ashamed to take out the bits you can't do.
     
    -Be humble and understand your limits.
    Neither you nor anyone is perfect, and that's FINE. The less perfection you demand from yourself, the happier you'll be, and the less false expectations you have of your own skills the less flawed your game will be too. We covered this above, but if you cannot write to save your life, don't make your game rely heavily on dialog.
    Be always willing to learn, but don't overestimate your own skills so much it becomes a detriment.
     
    -Game making is a skill. It requires practice.
    Hey, good news! It doesn't matter how bad you're at something, if you practice enough you will, at the very least, become competent.
    Like any other skill you do not start at master level with no experience. No one picks up a violin and immediately plays godly music, right? Sure, some people may have a better sense of music, but ultimately they will need practice to get any good. Game development is no different, so expecting yourself to be perfect right off the bat is as ridiculous as it sounds.
    Game development is actually quite complex in the sense that it has multiple aspects in it: art, music, design, writing, balance, coding and so on. Many people prefer to focus in a particular skillset and excel at those, others prefer to be jack of all trades, etc. No approach is wrong as long as you're practicing that development skill and getting better. There is no “bad” road here, if you make mistakes you will also learn how to fix them.
     
    -Remember your first work will probably be your worst.
    On your first projects, no matter how good you are at individual aspects such as art or writing, you will be still LEARNING.
    This is not meant to discourage you, but make you realize you will not achieve perfection or even CLOSE on the first try. Learning is important, and the sooner you make mistakes, the earlier you will learn how to fix them, and so make better games.
    This also means your first projects may be pretty shaky or unpopular with players due to inexperience or lack of skill, which is perfectly fine. Don't give up. Keep going!
     
    -Each successive game you release will be better. Don't get stuck in the first one.
    This ties in with step 6; a lot of people, even when the game is out, enter a cycle of constant re-releases. It's important to note that this can vary depending on your intent: are you happy having a single, ever-updating game? Then by all means! But most of us aim to make more games, so getting attached forever to one project does not help you.
    It's fine to bug-fix, patch and even re-release or revamp a game once (or in the case of fixes, multiple times), but don't get too obsessed with it. Don't get so attached to a single project that it blocks you from making anything else.
     
    -The more projects you start at the same time, the less you'll finish.
    Remember when I told you NOT to start up new projects while you were resting? Yeah, don't do it. Believe me, coming from someone who is constantly getting hit with idea brainstorms, starting multiple projects has never worked that well for anyone. The most you will manage is to alternate between projects, but it will sap your drive quickly.
    If you're stuck with a sudden awesome idea or even a mechanic that your current game doesn't really need but you REALLY want to make, write it all down and SAVE IT FOR LATER.
     
    -Don't make up excuses.
    This is kind of hard to explain, but hear me out: how many times have you heard someone comment they're not making their games because <circumstance>? Way too bloody many. When it comes to your game and your own progress, it's better to be honest with yourself. If something is not working, or even if you want to cancel a project, own up to it, make the decision and move on. Don't wibble about how you can't do it because the dog ate your keyboard.
    To clarify, there is absolutely no issue with circumstances in your life getting in the way (that's what life DOES) but don't use them or lie about it to justify your lack of progress. No one is going to judge you for your own projects, simply be honest. Heck, even a simple “I've been lazy lately” is a perfectly understandable and acceptable explanation as long as you don't hide behind it.
     
     
    I think that's all I can say about this for now! Thanks for reading and I hope to see you guys finish your projects soon, hope this was of at least some help!
     
    Other articles coming soon:
    How to: make a good game
    How to: deal with feedback (and criticism)
    How to: work in a team
    How to: present your game
    (Feel free to suggest some ideas, but remember to keep them broad subjects, not specific aspects such as mapping/writing etc)

    (Do forgive me for such a stark text-only article, I'd have liked to comission some silly chibies but I'm too poor XD)
     
    #1
  2. TheoAllen

    TheoAllen Self-proclaimed jack of all trades Veteran

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    I never finished a single project until I did this. Indeed these are very true.

    Great article dude ....

    *included in signature*
     
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  3. bgillisp

    bgillisp Global Moderators Global Mod

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    Agreed. Now granted I still don't have an RM game completed, I do have three games in other engines (Unlimited Adventures if anyone is curious), and I still recall what my first ever game looked like, as I was just learning everything. Let's just say that in the end the plot felt like I had written down ideas, and pulled them out of a hat and put them in.
     
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  4. Ms Littlefish

    Ms Littlefish Dangerously Caffeinated Global Mod

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    Gah! I have reached my 'like' quota for the day. But I assure you that I am punching the button much to my dismay of that error message. 

    I cannot agree more with you.

    You know I also would like to say and it definitely falls under "practice." But, I know everyone comes here with their ideas and they want to bolt out the gate and hop on them. But really? I spent the first several months I was on this forum just reading, watching, discussing, and observing. I entered contests. I just made very small things and took LOTS of notes. Not really with the intent of a game in mind but just to learn and practice things and gather other people's feedback and knowledge.

    If I want to use a music analogy; I had to learn how to read music and be taught what components made a song before I could write one. It didn't matter that I could hear the music in my head. I had no knowledge how to make it yet.

    So I think there is a great virtue not only in practicing your game making, but dialing the knob off 11 and studying for awhile. I think you save yourself a lot of self doubt and frustration.

    And absolutely, my first and only completed game at this time is nothing worth remark. I had some custom assets because I know how to do those things, but the game was a culmination of "what can my pea brain figure out how to do?"
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jan 30, 2015
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  5. Bonkers

    Bonkers Bioware, do you need a nap? Restaff

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    As someone who just finished their first game I can contest to how true this is. Similar articles written by indie pros all list similar advice.  It wasn't easy letting go, but it was worth it to learn.   Here's hoping enjoyment grows along with the experience.  

    When you put all that criticism and energy into the next game it helps make the development take shape better and faster than before.

    My own experience with graphic design and art went along a similar vein.  I wanted master pieces from the start, and it just doesn't work that way.  You spend your time, to the point enjoyment turns to procedure and that is what really refines the skill.  You build a method and a style from which to work as well as a pool of resources to draw from.

    I would see the pictures in my head, but my hand couldn't make them on paper.  There is a disconnect from the mind to the media.  The RM editor is no different.  The mind is also very unfair because it doesn't want to accept limitations and design flaws.  These are recognized externally.  
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jan 30, 2015
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  6. Milennin

    Milennin "With a bang and a boom!" Veteran

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    I've finished only one game so far and I recognise all the points that helped me do it in your article, it's absolutely spot on. My current, second game, is suffering way more from things that could potentially lead to a permanent delay; if only I had realised to stick to these points sooner. It's so easy for a game's scope to spiral out of control if you have a lot of ideas in your head. And the more you put in your game, the harder it is going to be to dial back on features. For my current game I'm debating whether to get rid of the custom Quest Log system that I had in mind and for which I had some cool ideas. But reading this article makes me realise that I may not really need it, so I might decide to just get rid of it altogether and make life a little easier for me as developer. :(
     
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  7. Engr. Adiktuzmiko

    Engr. Adiktuzmiko Chemical Engineer, Game Developer, Using BlinkBoy' Veteran

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    This is infinitely true... Seriously...

    On a side note: Rule 0: Start your project.
     
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  8. CzarSquid

    CzarSquid Veteran Veteran

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    This is an excellent topic. Definitely echoes my thoughts on making games. Honestly, if I didn't limit myself the games I am making would never be finished. Ever.

    I'd like to add one important detail.

    Have a deadline

    The idea of knowing when something needs to be completed has multiple purposes. It puts a flame under one to motivate the maker to get things done. It can create a sense of urgency needed to work to make that deadline. It should be a specific date. By setting this one will evaluate current work now on what must be done in order to reach it (even requiring cutting back). All attempts should make that deadline as real as possible and stick with with it. This also helps with scope in a sense. If you are making a 10+ hour game, better be ready to spend 10 months+ on it and set a date like that. If you are doing a simple project that's like 15 minutes, then set a week's deadline. Heck, my super simple idea had a deadline of finishing it within 2 days (Friend, is in signature).

    After the deadline comes up, evaluate what has been accomplished. Do you need more time to complete your game? Set a new deadline.

    Obviously not everyone will agree on me on this. However, I find setting up realistic goals is something that is important to gamemaking as well. My big project I'm working on now is set on all the things I can do in RPGmaker rather than relying on scripts and unreasonable imaginative ideas. I like sticking to ideas I know I can implement. A the heart of it all, since the game is an old school rpg so I need to think in those terms and not some revolutionary game that is going to change the world.
     
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  9. Makio-Kuta

    Makio-Kuta Canadian Goose Veteran

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    Yeah, deadlines are very hit and miss depending on the person. They help me a lot - I'll set mini deadlines for myself, make lists on what I want done in a day (overall, not just game dev. Even washing the dishes ends up on these lists.) These deadlines can really help give you a sense of drive.

    But for some people deadlines only create stress and anxiety. It's important to be good to yourself and stay healthy - Evaluate how setting deadlines works for you. If making a deadline gives you so much stress you can't work, step back and change the process. It's good to experiment with setting deadlines and make sure they are a thing for you because you dive right in a embrace them.

    But personally, I'm with you on that one. Deadlines put the fire under my butt and make me actually sit down and do things.

    Also! Make up a cute reward for making your self imposed deadlines. These deadlines aren't real, and therefor it can be really easy to shrug them off. "That deadline doesn't matter; it's just something I made up." Having a prize ( "If I meet my deadline, I'll buy myself something nice." "If I meet my deadline I'll take a week off and play this video game." "I won't watch this new show until I reach my goal of the day!" ) can really help with motivation problems.
     
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  10. Indrah

    Indrah Megane Berserker Veteran

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    Hm, I suppose the deadlines are a very valid point, but it's something that didn't come up when I wrote this maybe because they've never worked for me when there's no external pressure (like a contest or similar event). I've only managed to stick to my own deadlines ONCE, and that was when I was utterly in the red motivation-wise and challenged myself to a one-week game.
     
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  11. CzarSquid

    CzarSquid Veteran Veteran

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    Yeah, it is a hit/miss thing but I honestly think it can help get things done. Obviously game making should be a fun thing to do (or at least past the time). If you cause yourself to get sick because of the stress of the deadline then don't do it. It is nice on the other hand to have because when you do achieve some deadline can make you feel really good.

    Just make sure you set realistic ones. Just enough to make you a little uncomfortable but not too much where you destroy yourself in the process.
     
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  12. Makio-Kuta

    Makio-Kuta Canadian Goose Veteran

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    mhm Meeting deadlines makes me feel like I own the universe. It's a wonderful feeling.
     
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  13. Matseb2611

    Matseb2611 Innovate, don't emulate Veteran

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    Very good advices indeed. Most of them are even common sense and it's surprising why everyone doesn't follow them.

    I can say for sure the best way is to simply keep working on the game, always looking ahead and never back. Negative critique? Fine. Accept it, learn from it, but don't let it get you down. Simply make your next game better. Lack of motivation? Ask yourself "why?". If you think your game idea is boring, then change it so that it's not boring. Game's direction is something you always have full control of. And of course just remember to make a game that you would play and enjoy. None of us is here to make the next best thing that will revolutionise the gaming industry. Just make a fun game.
     
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  14. Tarsus

    Tarsus Veteran Veteran

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    Step 4 is by far the one I'm getting held at. I keep thinking of so many ways my game could be better and they all require me starting over. I'm trying really hard to restrain myself, saying get this one done and try it out on your next project.
     
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  15. Ms Littlefish

    Ms Littlefish Dangerously Caffeinated Global Mod

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    Excellent point, Masteb. 

    About feedback. When you start putting your first game out there, get a thick skin and a sense of humor. Don't take it too personally. Make a disconnect between the game and yourself. Most of the time feedback is about the game, not about you. Yes, you made the game but you are also in full control of it with the power to change it. We often don't realize something is wrong until someone points it out for us. Not dissimilar to how hard it is to find all the typos in your own school paper.

    So when you put yourself out there and people start testing your game, listen to them. Negative feedback is not bad feedback. It's still an opportunity. If someone makes a negative criticism, don't make excuses with them. If anything, discuss it further. Some will not word it as delicately as others but I don't think it's hard to tell apart who is giving you valuable input and who is just flaming you.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jan 31, 2015
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  16. Alexander Amnell

    Alexander Amnell Jaded Optimist Veteran

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    saved on computer because my internet is wonky... and because I really need to read this over and over until it gets in my head, especially the first step, which I've known I was guilty of for years and still fall victim to doing the exact opposite far to often.
     
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  17. Chiara

    Chiara Veteran Veteran

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    Great advice.

    Kinda sad to see how I still, after years of trying, haven't brought any project to completion - mostly because of scope, or losing interest, or sudden lack of time and never opening up the project file ever again and completely forgetting about it. Even though in theory, I knew most if not all that. D :

    Now I'm going to take a red pen and cross out everything in my planning so far that I don't really really need. Maybe I get this one finished this way.

    In any case, thanks for taking the time to write all those things down.
     
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  18. Heretic86

    Heretic86 Veteran Veteran

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    I'll take a crack at adding to this.

    There are appropriate times to use Scripts, and appropriate times to not use Scripts.

    I would strongly avoid scripts just for showing off.  Evaluate your situation and think hard about importing a new script depending on its complexity and how much it actually adds to your game.  I have written many scripts and each has varying degrees of difficulty.  One script that I made some changes to was Multiple Message Windows (XP) by Wachunga.  I added some stuff that made using the Script easier.  For example, putting \F+ as a symbol in the Text Box causes speaking characters to change their Animation Pose.  This is an asset because it speeds things up considerably.  It can be done by eventing, however, to achieve the same thing by eventing is far more time consuming as it first has to use a conditional branch for determining the direction of the event.  Thus, using \F+ and \F- in the Text is much much faster. 

    The other side of the coin is Scripts that eat a lot of time to apply to your game.  For example, a Side View Battle System is going to require heavy configuration editing and hours and hours of playtesting to be added properly to your game.  This is where Scripts become a detriment and not an asset.  Scripts themselves need to not only enhance the game experience for the player, but enhance the speed at which a game is developed.  Shaz wrote a program that allows exporting Event Commands.  Great move as it helps to troubleshoot eventing issues.  Thus, it is an asset.

    Last but not least is the order in which a game is developed.  Story needs to come first.  Put it in Notepad and get a rough draft of your story.  At least the basics.  Once the foundation is filled in, then you can fire up the editor.  Creating maps, then trying to write a story will cause your game to go into a paradox where you cant do this because you didnt do this, and you'll get caught in an endless loop of going back and forth and the game will never be finished because, as mentioned, it is in an infinite state of being overhauled.  Create a rough draft of your story first, even if it is just inside your own head.
     
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  19. Clord

    Clord Nya~ Veteran

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    Not sure if this is exactly relevant to completing the project in here as most don't do commercial games with RPG Maker but...


    When you are spending real money on your project, you should double or triple the expected expenses before you begin spending.


    I have paid at least double of what I expected to spend on my commercial project.


    In a case you run out of money, your project might just be a money sink since you can't fund it and then it becomes matter of rushing it out anyway or trying to save up again before continuing (dragging out the project.)
     
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  20. cradth

    cradth :) Veteran

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    It's accurate! Thanks for spending your time in writing this super-useful article.
    I read this once, the first step and third advice really helped me to finish a project.
     
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