How to make a character sprite?

Discussion in 'Resource Support' started by Diogo, Oct 23, 2017.

  1. Diogo

    Diogo Warper Member

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    Hey! I´m new here so sorry if I miss something or if this sort of question is prohibited..
    So, I just want to know how to make a good character sprite! I have a great idea for a game but... i can´t do a good spirte
    Wich program do I use? Paint Tool SAI? Piskel? I don´t know wich to use... and i want to make my character so bad!!
    Please, help me!
     
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  2. Sharm

    Sharm Pixel Tile Artist Veteran

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    I'm moving this to Resource Support, which is where to get help for creating resources or getting existing resources set up properly to work in RPG Maker. If you ever find yourself unsure of where something goes, looking at existing threads and pinned topics should give you a better idea of what belongs in that section.



    What program to use is going to depend a lot on what type of sprite you're making. You could make great sprites using Adobe Illustrator and Dragonbones, but that may not be the style you're trying for. Most sprites are made using pixel art, which is my personal favorite. For sprite creation I like to use Aseprite, but there are other good programs out there. For example, GIMP and Graphics Gale are pretty popular. Piskel looks like it's good, though I'm not personally familiar with how it works. I find working from an existing base much easier than creating from scratch, and there are some great bases out there.

    Unfortunately for those who aren't artistically skilled, there is no way to get around the fact that you will have to draw at some point. For those people it's a lot easier to start with editing. The more recent engines have character creators that should help get you close, and with a little tweaking or additions of things other artists have made available for use you can get a good sprite with a lot less skill needed. Just be sure to make sure to follow the licensing and crediting rules of any resources you use.
     
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  3. gstv87

    gstv87 Veteran Veteran

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    I'm using 3dstudio.
    <.<
    >.>
    what! .... it's what I have! XD

    I know it's a bit of an overkill, but that's what my art style called for.
    I had to make a bit of a rewiring of the code, to account for larger sprite sheets, and more frames per animation, which in turn screwed up the editor, because the editor is hard wired to read 3 frames per sequence.
    That's where you should start looking into: the Sprite_Character and Game_CharacterBase objects, and the functions set_character_bitmap, update_src_rect and update_anime_pattern
    Those functions tell the engine where to place the scan window to copy the characters from.
    *Regardless of what your characters end up looking like*, you'll have to look into those functions to make them work, which, if you do that from the start, you'll then be able to draw whatever you can come up with because you already know how to make them fit.
     
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  4. Sharm

    Sharm Pixel Tile Artist Veteran

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    I have no idea what that stuff is, but I bet it's good to know if you're wanting to do something radically different.
     
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  5. Llareian

    Llareian Jack of All Trades, Master of None Veteran

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    I just started playing around with making sprites. I'm using Pyxel Edit to make pixel art (including sprites). It's cheap ($9 USD) and doesn't have a TON of features but it seems to have everything you need to set up an animated sprite. Just make sure to watch the tutorials if you use it. It can be confusing to figure out on your own. I can't compare it to any of the other pixel editing programs, though, since I have no experience with them.
     
    Last edited: Oct 23, 2017
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  6. Sharm

    Sharm Pixel Tile Artist Veteran

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    Pyxel Edit is awesome and I'm constantly recommending it as a must have if you have any intention at all of making pixel tiles. If you want to do more than sprites it's not a bad way to go. I have experience with a lot of pixel editors, not limiting myself to only what I know is how I found Pyxel Edit in the first place, so I like to keep trying new things just in case one becomes the new favorite tool. It is pretty good for animating, but not the best. It's comparable to GIMP's animation features, though I think Pyxel Edit is more intuitive. I find Pyxel Edit the most useful for animating tiles or things inside of a mockup, but for sprites I don't use it. Graphics Gale beats it out for features, because it has onion skinning, but in my opinion Aseprite is way easier to use than Graphics Gale, and has more features. So, when I do sprites I currently use Aseprite. I'm going to go poke around in Piskel now, see what I think.

    Edit: Oh yes, I remember this program now. I wasn't impressed, very bare bones, and I feel claustrophobic with the interface. It would work for someone who didn't want to be bothered with too many options (like those who like to use MS Paint) but I don't personally recommend it.
     
    Last edited: Oct 23, 2017
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