How to reward your players?

Status
Not open for further replies.

Julijewels

Veteran
Veteran
Joined
May 24, 2022
Messages
52
Reaction score
92
First Language
English
Primarily Uses
RMMV
You would think. But, it's remarkably uncommon. I've yet to play a game that advertises "it's difficult" that was actually difficult.

Heck, even the vaunted "From Software" titles are some of the easiest games I've played. Granted, I've only played partially through Dark Souls 1 and most of the way through Elden Ring... but these are difficult games? Challenging?

REALLY?

Even the playerbase can't tell you they're hard. They're all like, "The game is difficult if you play a specific way!". Well, I mean, if you deliberately handicap yourself... then yeah... it's difficult. You can steer your car with your toes if you want to, but that doesn't mean steering your car is hard, just because it's difficult with your toes. Just means you're doing it wrong.
I think the main difficulty in From Software titles is from online play, which is incredibly nerfed in Elden Ring.

Also, anybody can grind level 1 to max in the first zone if they really wanted to. From what I remember, Lost Odyssey was the only JRPG I ever played where it capped your level and still kept the difficulty around the same throughout the whole game.

At that point though, isn't that a limitation on the player instead of balancing the game? I would argue that at the end of the day, difficulty isn't what makes people continue playing the game. It's something a lot of us want, yes, but in the end all it leads to is aggravation that in turn leads to players leaving the game.
 

Tai_MT

Veteran
Veteran
Joined
May 1, 2013
Messages
5,825
Reaction score
5,496
First Language
English
Primarily Uses
RMMV
@Julijewels

This is true. What most players aren't craving is "difficulty". They're craving those moments that difficulty can give you. Feeling good about overcoming a challenge, feeling clever for beating a challenge, personal validating of having completed a difficult task (Achievements tap into this quite nicely).

It really isn't much about "balance", that players chase. What they're chasing is something that makes them feel good about winning. Nothing more, nothing less. "Overcoming Challenge" is just the easiest way to express this desire. Or, in some cases, the only desirable method of overcoming this desire.

Why?

Because while it might be difficult to collect all 900 items on a map, this is time consuming and tedious... But spending 20 minutes online looking up a guide and practicing something takes less time and feels more like you accomplished something, even though everyone can and has done it.

Doesn't matter if it's ACTUALLY difficult. It only matters that it FEELS REWARDING when you win.
 

JohnDoeNews

Steam mod (MV/MZ)
Veteran
Joined
Apr 25, 2017
Messages
1,044
Reaction score
823
First Language
Dutch
Primarily Uses
RMMV
When it comes to difficulty, I tried to balance my game like this:

When you win, the enemies get a little stronger the next game (the beaten enemy gets 1 upgrade per one, and all other enemies got 0.2 upgrades per win), while enemies get a little weaker when you lose.

Enemies grow stronger faster than they grow weak, though. So the more you play, the harder the game gets.

---

This is also one of the reasons I have those daily rewards in my game. Playing the game more, makes the games harder and therefore more interesting.

Another reason is that I was players to return often, so they can play the new scenes when they are uploaded. The game is more interesting if there is a pause between the scenes (so the player might defeat the same enemy multiple times and unlock better versions of their cards).

A third reason I want players to come back often, is because the game is full of periodical rewards. Like cards that can only be unlocked during the holidays, or easter, or valentines day. And in-game happenings that only happen once a real-time day.

There is a lot more thought behind it than just getting my players addicted and get me in a higher place in the rankings (which wouldn't even be the case with the full version, only with the HTML demo).
 
Last edited:

Pasteleptic

Costan's Sin
Veteran
Joined
Oct 4, 2014
Messages
39
Reaction score
57
First Language
English
Primarily Uses
RMMZ
I always thought the idea of daily rewards and stream promoting content is silly outside of an MMORPG. You want the players to play on their own time, without feeling obligated or coerced to, and without trying to artificially increase the player's playtime. Playing the game should be its' own reward.
 

JohnDoeNews

Steam mod (MV/MZ)
Veteran
Joined
Apr 25, 2017
Messages
1,044
Reaction score
823
First Language
Dutch
Primarily Uses
RMMV
In my case it is a card collecting game. In card collecting games it is very common to get daily and weekly rewards, daily and weekly quests and other kinds of daily and weekly based extra's.

If you actually think it is only done in MMORPG's, then I guess you don't play much mobile/browser games. Because literally all successful ones are doing it. And I am just guessing them doing it and them being successful is, one way or another, connected.

"Playing the game should be its own reward", that is way sillier in my opinion. When you play the game, you already play the game.
 

Pasteleptic

Costan's Sin
Veteran
Joined
Oct 4, 2014
Messages
39
Reaction score
57
First Language
English
Primarily Uses
RMMZ
In my case it is a card collecting game. In card collecting games it is very common to get daily and weekly rewards, daily and weekly quests and other kinds of daily and weekly based extra's.

If you actually think it is only done in MMORPG's, then I guess you don't play much mobile/browser games. Because literally all successful ones are doing it. And I am just guessing them doing it and them being successful is, one way or another, connected.

"Playing the game should be its own reward", that is way sillier in my opinion. When you play the game, you already play the game.
Correlation doesn't imply causation — I'm fully aware of the scummy nature of mobile business models many companies take. These games aren't necessarily successful because of a repetitive formula, marketing makes a difference with exposure. Indie developers have to take risks and innovate much more than an established company, it's the reason why Undertale and Omori were so successful. Interestingly enough, these games don't feature a daily or weekly reward system either.

For your last point, I'll bring up a YouTube video that came up on my feed. The title was "Games Aren't Fun Anymore". I didn't watch the video, but I already got the point it was trying to make. No matter the budget, or how epic a game is, you'll eventually get bored of it. What's the problem? How our brain works.

I'm not going to get into it here (long topic), but basically, the more you're exposed to games, the less of a euphoric effect you'll feel playing them (similar to drugs). Playing the game should be the reward, not something you slog through (or wait) to chase. Sometimes all it takes is sitting in a town, enjoying the music, sounds, and atmosphere.
 

Julijewels

Veteran
Veteran
Joined
May 24, 2022
Messages
52
Reaction score
92
First Language
English
Primarily Uses
RMMV
I'd like to add that in 99% of games dailies aren't even worth it. Eventually you get into the habit of just logging in to claim the boring reward and that in itself can add another factor that causes players to drop the game altogether. Some players will enjoy it while others will think that it just impedes their ability to hop directly into a game.
 

JohnDoeNews

Steam mod (MV/MZ)
Veteran
Joined
Apr 25, 2017
Messages
1,044
Reaction score
823
First Language
Dutch
Primarily Uses
RMMV
Correlation doesn't imply causation — I'm fully aware of the scummy nature of mobile business models many companies take. These games aren't necessarily successful because of a repetitive formula, marketing makes a difference with exposure. Indie developers have to take risks and innovate much more than an established company, it's the reason why Undertale and Omori were so successful. Interestingly enough, these games don't feature a daily or weekly reward system either.

For your last point, I'll bring up a YouTube video that came up on my feed. The title was "Games Aren't Fun Anymore". I didn't watch the video, but I already got the point it was trying to make. No matter the budget, or how epic a game is, you'll eventually get bored of it. What's the problem? How our brain works.

I'm not going to get into it here (long topic), but basically, the more you're exposed to games, the less of a euphoric effect you'll feel playing them (similar to drugs). Playing the game should be the reward, not something you slog through (or wait) to chase. Sometimes all it takes is sitting in a town, enjoying the music, sounds, and atmosphere.

You do realize you call my game scummy too, right?

But you are talking about huge games as hearthstone, elder scrolls blades, etc... Those are professionally engineered games by billion dollar companies. And they offer daily quests and daily rewards.

But I can also name countless minor company games, lite Trivia crack, candy crush, bubble witch saga, south park phone destroyer, song pop, hustler... All games that are out there for years, and still are on the top of the browser based games. And they all offer daily rewards.

It is bizar that the complete gaming industry sees some tactics as a success formula, but here on the RPG maker forum, you people know better. You guys say I bribe my players, my tactics are scummy and what not... Why? Cause I recreate something all big games do.

But you know what? My players like the daily rewards. They do come back to play a game or 2 daily, like I have played heartstone daily for years, just to complete my daily quests and improve my deck and I loved it too.
 

Pasteleptic

Costan's Sin
Veteran
Joined
Oct 4, 2014
Messages
39
Reaction score
57
First Language
English
Primarily Uses
RMMZ
You do realize you call my game scummy too, right?

But you are talking about huge games as hearthstone, elder scrolls blades, etc... Those are professionally engineered games by billion dollar companies. And they offer daily quests and daily rewards.

But I can also name countless minor company games, lite Trivia crack, candy crush, bubble witch saga, south park phone destroyer, song pop, hustler... All games that are out there for years, and still are on the top of the browser based games. And they all offer daily rewards.

It is bizar that the complete gaming industry sees some tactics as a success formula, but here on the RPG maker forum, you people know better. You guys say I bribe my players, my tactics are scummy and what not... Why? Cause I recreate something all big games do.

But you know what? My players like the daily rewards. They do come back to play a game or 2 daily, like I have played heartstone daily for years, just to complete my daily quests and improve my deck and I loved it too.
I apologize I came off that way. I'm sure your game is perfectly fine and fun; I wasn't trying to insult you as a person or developer, and my opinion was never a reflection of you. Bottom line is that whatever works for you and your player base is what works, and there is nothing wrong with that.
 

Tai_MT

Veteran
Veteran
Joined
May 1, 2013
Messages
5,825
Reaction score
5,496
First Language
English
Primarily Uses
RMMV
You do realize you call my game scummy too, right?

But you are talking about huge games as hearthstone, elder scrolls blades, etc... Those are professionally engineered games by billion dollar companies. And they offer daily quests and daily rewards.

Sorry, gotta be a jerk here. "Appeal to popularity" isn't really a valid argument to make. I mean... illegal substances are QUITE popular... but their use REALLY isn't very good for human health... So, "appeal to popularity" is not hill anyone should want to die on.

Something isn't necessarily popular because it's good. Something to keep in mind.

But I can also name countless minor company games, lite Trivia crack, candy crush, bubble witch saga, south park phone destroyer, song pop, hustler... All games that are out there for years, and still are on the top of the browser based games. And they all offer daily rewards.

It is bizar that the complete gaming industry sees some tactics as a success formula, but here on the RPG maker forum, you people know better. You guys say I bribe my players, my tactics are scummy and what not... Why? Cause I recreate something all big games do.

Is it also bizarre that the same people in the gaming industry saw it as "acceptable" to skirt laws and get children hooked on gambling, too? Getting children to buy loot boxes and spend a ton of money on what are effectively slot machines?

Said companies saw this as a "success formula" too. They threw their morals out the window to get rich off the members of society that were socially vulnerable.

Pretty interesting that said tactics also went away once they were made illegal... or were called out by the world at large for being quite scummy.

But, hey, EA made their money! Successful business tactic! Skirt the law, exploit game players, make a lot of money! It's not WRONG! It's not BAD!

It is also worth noting that when you come to these forums, you aren't really dealing with "big name devs". You're dealing with people who come from a background of just playing video games. As in, they decided to make a video game after playing a lot of video games. There are exceptions of people here just to attempt to "cash in" and have no idea what the experience is like on the end of video game players, but they're few and far between.

When you get people telling you that a game mechanic isn't fun, or is scummy, or what-have-you... you are getting the perspective OF A POTENTIAL PLAYER. As in, someone who has likely played a lot of video games and is telling you what they personally like and don't like.

There's a stark difference between someone trying to make a game that a player finds fun and one that is trying to make a game just to make a large profit.

But you know what? My players like the daily rewards. They do come back to play a game or 2 daily, like I have played heartstone daily for years, just to complete my daily quests and improve my deck and I loved it too.

I have to ask... do they REALLY like them? What sort of data are you using to come to that conclusion? How do you separate it from "addiction"? How do you separate it from "habit"?

I wonder how many would complain if you removed them. I wonder how many people are playing your game due to "Addiction", rather than because it's fun. Removing them might give you a pretty solid answer. If you remove them and people quit playing... I think it'd be a pretty solid piece of evidence that the game itself isn't fun. Or, if you remove them, and 90% of the playerbase complained that they were gone pretty immediately, that'd be a good indication that they find such mechanics "to their liking".

I feel like your argument is the same one Blizzard used to justify their formula for "fun". "Players are engaging with it, therefore they must like it!" Using it to justify lack of original and interesting content. Using it to justify larger grinds and more annoying daily checklists.

I mean, if that's the argument you're making, then we may as well say, "Everyone loves working, because so many people are doing it!"

Personally, I don't engage with "dailies" all that much in any game. I never really have. I lack the ability to become "addicted" in that way. My brain isn't wired for it. I see it from a coldly logical standpoint. What the game is asking me to do isn't worth the reward it is offering me. 50 of the premium currency for doing this month long task! I can't buy anything with 50 of that currency. Nothing in the store is really worth buying in the first place. The task itself is basically "grind for like 20 hours this week on this one task". No thanks, I'd rather have fun NOW instead of later.

On top of a reward not being worth it, it is asking me to play the game every single day, whether I want to play it or not. Why would I do that? Why would I WANT to do that? I have a collection of like a bajillion games I've yet to complete and about a quarter of those I even find fun in small spurts with like a handful I find fun for long periods of time. Why would I commit to logging into a game every single day for a daily reward or daily challenge or whatever?

Unless I'm an addict... I wouldn't. I got other things to do. I'll log in to play a game every day if that game is fun to play. I logged in to Ark: Survival Evolved every single day for like 3 months just because I was enjoying the gameplay and the story so much. Once I beat "The Island" map in Ark (first map), I quit playing for a very long time. Heck, I was trying to complete the story of the game and I'm on "Extinction (fourth map of six)" with my friend right now, but we haven't played for months. I'll get back to it again at some point, but I'm not logging in every day.

Heck, just this month, my friend and I have been logging into Stellaris every single day just to play a couple games of the multiplayer.

The month before that, we were playing Elden Ring.

Several months back, we were playing Earth Defense Force 2025.

You know what we didn't log into Daily to play?

Halo Infinite. We played that for like a week (despite the daily challenges!) and then never looked back.

You know what else we're not logging into daily?

Minion Masters. This has daily login rewards and challenges which net you "new cards" you can use. I quit playing this game due to the lack of "interesting things to do" with the minions (see: lack of synergy) and the very slow "progression" of obtaining new minions (cards).

Oh, need some more?

Idle TD Monsters. We played this game for a long time because the progression itself was fun. But, it has daily login stuff too that we never engaged with. We're currently not playing that game anymore either.

Monster Hunter World! We're not playing that anymore, either. It's got Dailies and Weeklies. We played the storyline to completion and then when the game said, "Now do it all again on hard mode against harder versions of these monsters!" we quit playing. Before that, we'd put like 2 solid months into the game. Once it introduced "not fun" stuff to us, we quit playing.

The list of games with dailies in them that we didn't play that long and have no intention of ever picking back up again are quite long.

Oh, and my friend? Yeah, he's an addict of illegal substances. You would think the Daily thing would work on him, but it doesn't work on him. You would think the gambling addiction stuff would work on him too. It doesn't. Probably because that's not his "high".

Heck, him and I even play Battle Royale games differently than most people because we care about winning, rather than chasing the adrenaline boost. Put simply, we hide and avoid all combat until the game gets down to the final few teams. We always finish in the Top 3. Because we don't play like Addicts. Most of the time, this gameplay gets boring to us, so we don't even play Battle Royale games all that much as a result. I mean, all you have to do to win is not engage in combat! Just run to the next circle when it comes up and hide once you get there. Everyone else will kill each other and eliminate themselves, so there's no need to do anything other than that. There isn't even a reason to loot in most cases. The loot just entices you to stick around and get shot.

For video game players like us... a "Daily Reward" is little more than an Addiction Mechanic. It isn't fun in itself, it is "fun" because it's an Addiction. Sort of like what WoW players have been experiencing for a while (they have termed it "copium" in the last few years). They're playing WoW because... it's WoW. All their friends are there. They still remember when it used to be fun. So, they log in because... MAYBE it'll be fun again... Maybe. Copium inhale. Maybe the Addiction Mechanics will work this time and the expansion won't be garbage. MAYBE. Maybe it isn't just pointless grind this time. MAYBE. Copium inhale.

So, I always have to ask people, "Are you sure it's fun?".

If something is fun, you can explain what you like about it and why. If it's not fun... then you're probably addicted in some way.
---
Okay, done being a jerk.
 

JohnDoeNews

Steam mod (MV/MZ)
Veteran
Joined
Apr 25, 2017
Messages
1,044
Reaction score
823
First Language
Dutch
Primarily Uses
RMMV
I apologize I came off that way. I'm sure your game is perfectly fine and fun; I wasn't trying to insult you as a person or developer, and my opinion was never a reflection of you. Bottom line is that whatever works for you and your player base is what works, and there is nothing wrong with that.
It's not just you. It is the whole community. Always so negative, arrogant and always ready to bring other peoples work down. Just open 100 random topics, count the negative vs the positive replies and see what I mean.

And it is not just me. The forum is actually very infamous for this in the wider game building community.
 

Tai_MT

Veteran
Veteran
Joined
May 1, 2013
Messages
5,825
Reaction score
5,496
First Language
English
Primarily Uses
RMMV
Infamous where? I did a quick google search out of curiosity... 10 pages of search in for "RPG Maker Forums are bad" and I came up with two topics... one from a member who doesn't understand the forum rules and why they exist... and one who is upset about DLC and claims their review of it was censored.

Not really sure about the negativity either. I mean, I can't really talk since I'm... me. But, I really don't post all that often. Most of the posts here in any random topic are quite friendly.

Well, unless we're saying, "any disagreement in my point of view is negativity". Then, maybe that makes sense for a viewpoint of "always so negative, arrogant, and ready to bring other peoples' work down"?

Because, honestly... there's not much of that here.
 

sunnyFVA

how a demon do
Veteran
Joined
Nov 6, 2021
Messages
41
Reaction score
43
First Language
English
Primarily Uses
RMMV
Before getting to the main topic, I don't think I see much in the way of negativity, arrogance, or bringing others down around here. What I see pretty consistently is passionate people going the extra mile again and again to help just about anyone who asks. Frankly, if ever I'm rolling my eyes at objectionable behavior, it's usually the occasional entitled, nonsensical requests by fly-by-night users who STILL receive incredible assistance and compassion from this community.

Anyway. No bones about it, login bonuses are retention schemes that play with users' psychology very directly. Consider the difference between a conventional daily (there is something to claim that refreshes each calendar day whether you get it or not) and a similar system where something can be claimed once per day, but failing to claim simply pauses the reward schedule until you do. The first system exerts pressure that the second does not.

But I can also name countless minor company games, lite Trivia crack, candy crush, bubble witch saga, south park phone destroyer, song pop, hustler...

These are not small games. Two of them are produced by the same literal billion-dollar firm (King Ltd.), and that firm produces dozens of similar games with the same retention and monetization model. Statistically, the most common customer in the games market is a middle-aged "casual" player of "casual" mobile games (to my knowledge and when last I checked). It does not take much to determine why these games borrow so many practices from the casino industry.

You are more than welcome to adopt these practices in your own work, but that does not make you immune to commentary or analysis. These things are successful and drive retention (and so profit) not because they improve the user experience but because they are proven methods of exploitation. This is not to say no user can ever feel positively when experiencing these systems. However, this superficial positive feeling is still ultimately the bait on the hook.

I think there is something to be said for similar, less exploitative systems, though. Randomness comes to mind as suffering from the same pitfalls: an opportunity for potentially healthy excitement that is frequently instead used to motivate players to do things they wouldn't otherwise find enjoyable at all (e.g. low drop rates in subscription-based games). Divorced from real-world psychological pressures, I believe both randomness and reward-type systems could be present without being harmful. It's just that the harmful structures are easy to implement and already quite optimized. If one's goal is blanket user retention, it is trivial to graft any of the solved reward systems onto any game. The character of that game will just be irrevocably altered. It's a matter of the developer's priorities for the project.

So, while I think a version of what you describe could exist without making the game generally worse, it would take a colossal reinvention of the practice for it to break away from a spectrum with "crutch for a product in which the developer lacks confidence" at one end and "blatant, shameless exploitation" at the other. I would be very interested to see what that would look like.
 

Iron_Brew

Veteran
Veteran
Joined
Nov 19, 2021
Messages
416
Reaction score
1,207
First Language
English
Primarily Uses
RMMV
This post is too much.

You do realize you call my game scummy too, right?

But you are talking about huge games as hearthstone, elder scrolls blades, etc... Those are professionally engineered games by billion dollar companies. And they offer daily quests and daily rewards.

"Big company does it so it can't be scummy!" is a really baffling take. My man, part of the reason these practices are seen as scummy is because they are professionally engineering these games to not have content but instead keep you playing with as little actual development as possible. They have the resources to develop compelling content but instead hire casino psychologists to engineer the perfect lootbox sound to keep little Timmy spending 99p a day on his parents' credit card.

I feel like you're proving your detractors' points for them here.

But I can also name countless minor company games, lite Trivia crack, candy crush, bubble witch saga, south park phone destroyer, song pop, hustler... All games that are out there for years, and still are on the top of the browser based games. And they all offer daily rewards.

You really should look into who makes games before posting stuff like this. Candy Crush is one of the biggest IPs on the planet, and those other phone games are all manufactured by multimillion(sometimes billion) dollar companies.

The fact a game doesn't look like Elder Scrolls: Blades doesn't mean it's indie, or "minor company".

It is bizar that the complete gaming industry sees some tactics as a success formula, but here on the RPG maker forum, you people know better. You guys say I bribe my players, my tactics are scummy and what not... Why? Cause I recreate something all big games do.

If you recreate something scummy people are going to call your practices scummy! You flew off the handle when I pointed out that rewarding players in the way you're describing is a bribe, but I don't really see any counterargument to the point coming from you other than you saying "You accusing me of things like bribes is just pathetic".

I wasn't accusing you of anything, I was saying that the specific rewardable activities and "incentives" you were listing were tantamount to bribery.

But you know what? My players like the daily rewards. They do come back to play a game or 2 daily, like I have played heartstone daily for years, just to complete my daily quests and improve my deck and I loved it too.

You should poll them and get some data there if you honestly want to demonstrate this - I'd love to see anonymised hard evidence that players think your dailies system is a feature they enjoy. If they feel incentivised, good on them, but I still reckon that's a bribe - and that it's exactly as @Pasteleptic says, the game should be its own reward.

Reward your players with content rather than tricking them/making them feel obliged would be my honest advice here. Or keep doing what you're doing and stop objecting when people call the practices you're employing out as scummy.
 
Last edited:

Basileus

Veteran
Veteran
Joined
Oct 18, 2013
Messages
399
Reaction score
576
First Language
English
Primarily Uses
Serious question: Why bother?

Daily login mechanics exist so that live service games can keep people playing in between events / updates to create a habit, which makes players more willing to engage in micro-transactions. These mechanics / reward structures have a very negative reputation among most gaming audiences due to companies using them to exploit children with scam games. Any game using these daily task systems will get a lot of criticism and many people will not want to play it. The games that can survive this criticism are ones that 1) have a big brand name / IP attached to them, 2) have a high budget for graphics, 3) are free-to-play so there is no investment just to pick it up, or 4) has gameplay good enough that players are willing to ignore the sketchy mechanics.

So what is the point of the daily login rewards? Are you removing items from the game to give them out as login rewards? Are you going to cripple the player's ability to gain money so they have to get it by logging in for a month instead? Are you planning to release regular content updates like weekly / seasonal events to reward players for sticking with your game?

You need to have a good reason to put in the work to make this kind of system. Those billion dollar companies know these are scummy systems and are prepared to deal with some players being upset. They have strong brand names, big marketing budgets, and shiny graphics to draw people in, and hundreds of employees to pump out regular content.

If you are charging money up front to buy the game in the first place, don't have the capacity to produce new content every 2-3 weeks, and don't have new characters to sell (with good models and animation), then you will have a hard time convincing most gamers to pick up your game at all, let alone stick with it long-term. Players don't keep logging in just to get a little gold and a worthless piece of gear. They log in because they are expecting new content and don't want to miss free stuff while they wait.
 

EidolonDreams

Villager
Member
Joined
May 20, 2022
Messages
13
Reaction score
10
First Language
English
Primarily Uses
RMMZ
Since you're doing a card game with login rewards, I'll mention some game design thing that you should keep in mind...

FOMO. The fear of missing out.

Mobile games use this a lot to keep people coming back, but there's a catch.

If you gate your stuff too harshly (e.g., putting the best rewards at a full month's worth of log-ins) then it's going to build a lot of stress and resentment in your player base.

Smart games either make the rewards a negligible bonus (which can negate their effectiveness in drawing people back), or they put the "best stuff" around the 24-25 day login mark. That way you can miss quite a few days (people have lives, stuff happens) and not feel like they lost out on something major.

tl;dr: don't punish your players for not being able to play every day.
 

JohnDoeNews

Steam mod (MV/MZ)
Veteran
Joined
Apr 25, 2017
Messages
1,044
Reaction score
823
First Language
Dutch
Primarily Uses
RMMV
I'm not even going to read it all. Instead of telling us how you guys reward your players (which was the topic) you rather piss in my ideas. And then be all oblivious when I say something about it.

Edit: It's always the same ******s who do that, btw.
 
Last edited:

Pasteleptic

Costan's Sin
Veteran
Joined
Oct 4, 2014
Messages
39
Reaction score
57
First Language
English
Primarily Uses
RMMZ
I'm not even going to read it all. Instead of telling us how you guys reward your players (which was the topic) you rather piss in my ideas. And then be all oblivious when I say something about it.

Edit: It's always the same ******s who do that, btw.
I mean, you did kind of come out strong from the beginning and tell people what should and shouldn't be rewards. Why bother even making this thread in the first place if you're not willing to have an open discussion?
 

Iron_Brew

Veteran
Veteran
Joined
Nov 19, 2021
Messages
416
Reaction score
1,207
First Language
English
Primarily Uses
RMMV
I'm not even going to read it all. Instead of telling us how you guys reward your players (which was the topic) you rather piss in my ideas. And then be all oblivious when I say something about it.

Edit: It's always the same ******s who do that, btw.

What particular slur did you choose to bring out before the forum censored it, John? Disappointed in you.

Why not engage with the discussion you started rather than getting pissy when you realise you are the only person on the other side of this issue.
 

JohnDoeNews

Steam mod (MV/MZ)
Veteran
Joined
Apr 25, 2017
Messages
1,044
Reaction score
823
First Language
Dutch
Primarily Uses
RMMV
I mean, you did kind of come out strong from the beginning and tell people what should and shouldn't be rewards. Why bother even making this thread in the first place if you're not willing to have an open discussion?
I clarified my question. But whatever.

What particular slur did you choose to bring out before the forum censored it, John? Disappointed in you.

Why not engage with the discussion you started rather than getting pissy when you realise you are the only person on the other side of this issue.
Hmmm... I censured it. This is not how the forum censors things. But if you want to know what I think of you, feel free to send me a DM.
 
Status
Not open for further replies.

Latest Threads

Latest Profile Posts

Game Making Every Day #20:kaohi:

ScreenShot_8_14_2022_11_55_51.png
FINALLY added the comic bubble to the Title Screen...
I know I'll put one of my game's sprites here to give the illusion that I am a productive member of game society.
handelspriteanim.gif

Forum statistics

Threads
124,506
Messages
1,164,099
Members
163,330
Latest member
Darkmorve
Top