HazukiWolfe

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So I'm making a game for about a year now and Ive gotten to the point where I'm wondering it I should even continue.

I use others amazing tile sets and music cause I'm not that good at pixel art. I do make my own characters and Ive been told they are ok. (example $Hazuki3.png) but I'm not good at objects or anything else. I'm trying to make icons for the game but I feel like they arent as good as others Ive seen on here. (examplefood.png) Im worried that people wont like that Im using others tilesets (I made sure they are ok to use) or Im worried that it wont look good if I made my own. I want to get better at the art and Ive tried to watch videos and just study others work but I just cant get a hold on it.

to those who have made games with others tilesets, was your finished game successful? was it even worth it in the end?
 

Andar

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how do you define successful?
If you define that as having sold X-thousand copies (like some people around here) then you most likely will never be successful.
If you define it as having fun making the game, then you will almost always be successful.

That said most people make games with graphics and tiles from other people.
The only way that can put people off is if you mix graphics that don't fit together (mixing POP! and Medieval/PVG-Series graphics is only the most obvious failure, sometimes people don't understand that some other sets also don't go well together.
 

HazukiWolfe

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how do you define successful?
If you define that as having sold X-thousand copies (like some people around here) then you most likely will never be successful.
If you define it as having fun making the game, then you will almost always be successful.

That said most people make games with graphics and tiles from other people.
The only way that can put people off is if you mix graphics that don't fit together (mixing POP! and Medieval/PVG-Series graphics is only the most obvious failure, sometimes people don't understand that some other sets also don't go well together.


I did mean if they enjoy it. I don't care if I make money from it, I just want people to enjoy the story
 

Rukiri

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Don't let the art aspect burn you as it takes time to git gud!
But, learn color pallets and contrast. My sprites are a good example for this.
upload_2019-7-5_17-9-50.png

Now, if you're working on a 8bit style game than yea some of these look great, others that have shading... no. Use a darker outline and a color that isn't a step down from the next color pallet. Each color should be from different hues in the color spectrum!

I'm not great at tilesets, heck I'd just pay someone to do that for me, but I am good at character models so that's what I focus on. You can't be good at everything. The same is said with game development, it's not wise to be a 1 man show now RPG Maker kinda makes this easy for you until you're doing stuff RM wasn't meant to do but that's a different story and topic for another time.

Look at Chrono Trigger, took an entire team to make it but with the tools we have today and Kingdom of the Dump a REALLY GOOD example of a classic RPG it could be made with a single man team or even with a partner. But, Chrono Trigger was done in an entire year! While KOTD is a great project to follow most indie 2D RPGs take close to decade to finish, especially the good ones! The reasons come from obvious time spent on every game mechanic, then art, then you know the game...

Also pick your game engine wisely, do you want the freedom knowing yes anything you can think of can be done or do you want to work within limitations (yes, I am referencing RM like this) ? I finally settled on Unity after years of testing, programming, etc. It's 2D tools are fantastic! It's also got 2D SPECIFIC rendering now, so it's no longer using it's 3D renderer to render 2D! It's also not that difficult to use, but you do need to learn C#! I do want to mention bolt because it's a great companion to C# where most if not all your games mechanics can be done visually so even if you can't program you can make the game you want. For me, I'm using bolt and writing custom C# actions for bolt to mimic RPG Makers eventing system.
 

Milennin

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It depends on your definition of success. For me, the most important factor is whether I enjoy playing my own game. Every other person who plays it and happens to enjoy it is a bonus on top of that. By my own definition, all of my games have been successes, even if they've had maybe a few hundred downloads in total. I don't even plan on releasing my current project, as I want to keep it for just myself to play. It's worth working on as long as I get enjoyment out of making it and playing it.
 

Wavelength

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Very few RPG Maker games use zero assets from other people (or RTP). Almost everyone uses assets from elsewhere, because it wouldn't be practical to create everything from scratch except for a very small game. (Not only would the time/money spent be exorbitant, but it's unlikely the person making the game can make every type of asset as well as a royalty-free resource they'd buy or find elsewhere.) And many of these games are still beloved.

As far as making the finished product look good, it's all about your ability to create consistent and good art (and sound) direction. Make sure you pick stuff that fits well together, and doesn't clash stylistically when the player is playing the game. And beyond art direction, of course, it's all about creating engaging gameplay and (unless there's no story) a well-presented story with likable characters.

In short - yes, you can create something great without making everything from scratch.

By the way, your character and icons are really nice.
 

HazukiWolfe

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Don't let the art aspect burn you as it takes time to git gud!
But, learn color pallets and contrast. My sprites are a good example for this.
View attachment 118864

Now, if you're working on a 8bit style game than yea some of these look great, others that have shading... no. Use a darker outline and a color that isn't a step down from the next color pallet. Each color should be from different hues in the color spectrum!

I'm not great at tilesets, heck I'd just pay someone to do that for me, but I am good at character models so that's what I focus on. You can't be good at everything. The same is said with game development, it's not wise to be a 1 man show now RPG Maker kinda makes this easy for you until you're doing stuff RM wasn't meant to do but that's a different story and topic for another time.

Look at Chrono Trigger, took an entire team to make it but with the tools we have today and Kingdom of the Dump a REALLY GOOD example of a classic RPG it could be made with a single man team or even with a partner. But, Chrono Trigger was done in an entire year! While KOTD is a great project to follow most indie 2D RPGs take close to decade to finish, especially the good ones! The reasons come from obvious time spent on every game mechanic, then art, then you know the game...

Also pick your game engine wisely, do you want the freedom knowing yes anything you can think of can be done or do you want to work within limitations (yes, I am referencing RM like this) ? I finally settled on Unity after years of testing, programming, etc. It's 2D tools are fantastic! It's also got 2D SPECIFIC rendering now, so it's no longer using it's 3D renderer to render 2D! It's also not that difficult to use, but you do need to learn C#! I do want to mention bolt because it's a great companion to C# where most if not all your games mechanics can be done visually so even if you can't program you can make the game you want. For me, I'm using bolt and writing custom C# actions for bolt to mimic RPG Makers eventing system.

Im using MV which seems fine for the game being made. the kind of style Im working on is kinda like final fantasy 6. I do get help from others and Im grateful to them but its mostly just me and my husband doing this as we don't have the money to pay anyone.
 

Tw0Face

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I did mean if they enjoy it. I don't care if I make money from it, I just want people to enjoy the story

If you enjoy it yourself, others will probably enjoy it as well.

As for development, you shouldn't worry too much about how well others do. You don't have to compete with them. It's all about having fun making your game. You decide for yourself what you make of it.

Greetings,
Tw0Face
 

HazukiWolfe

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Very few RPG Maker games use zero assets from other people (or RTP). Almost everyone uses assets from elsewhere, because it wouldn't be practical to create everything from scratch except for a very small game. (Not only would the time/money spent be exorbitant, but it's unlikely the person making the game can make every type of asset as well as a royalty-free resource they'd buy or find elsewhere.) And many of these games are still beloved.

As far as making the finished product look good, it's all about your ability to create consistent and good art (and sound) direction. Make sure you pick stuff that fits well together, and doesn't clash stylistically when the player is playing the game. And beyond art direction, of course, it's all about creating engaging gameplay and (unless there's no story) a well-presented story with likable characters.

In short - yes, you can create something great without making everything from scratch.

By the way, your character and icons are really nice.


I guess I just started to panic. Id look at the subreddit for RPG maker and I see other creations and it made me think that maybe I need to not be lazy and make my own stuff. and thank you
 

HazukiWolfe

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It depends on your definition of success. For me, the most important factor is whether I enjoy playing my own game. Every other person who plays it and happens to enjoy it is a bonus on top of that. By my own definition, all of my games have been successes, even if they've had maybe a few hundred downloads in total. I don't even plan on releasing my current project, as I want to keep it for just myself to play. It's worth working on as long as I get enjoyment out of making it and playing it.

I am having fun making the game. Me and my husband are working on a huge story for the game
 

Rukiri

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Very few RPG Maker games use zero assets from other people (or RTP). Almost everyone uses assets from elsewhere, because it wouldn't be practical to create everything from scratch except for a very small game. (Not only would the time/money spent be exorbitant, but it's unlikely the person making the game can make every type of asset as well as a royalty-free resource they'd buy or find elsewhere.) And many of these games are still beloved.

As far as making the finished product look good, it's all about your ability to create consistent and good art (and sound) direction. Make sure you pick stuff that fits well together, and doesn't clash stylistically when the player is playing the game. And beyond art direction, of course, it's all about creating engaging gameplay and (unless there's no story) a well-presented story with likable characters.

In short - yes, you can create something great without making everything from scratch.

By the way, your character and icons are really nice.
Actually most indies create their own assets, Unsighted is a good example here as Tiana is the sole pixel artist and programmer and the game looks manifique!! People go into RPG Maker half assed and generally lazy, which is why most RPG Maker games look well.. bad.

Im using MV which seems fine for the game being made. the kind of style Im working on is kinda like final fantasy 6. I do get help from others and Im grateful to them but its mostly just me and my husband doing this as we don't have the money to pay anyone.

If you have a good story and base game/prototype you could probably request help as this does happen.

A story is only as good as the way it's presented, the story could be godly but if it's presented bad it could end up disastrous... Chrono Cross followed Trigger and there was no way it was going to surpass or even be as good but treat it as it's own game and you find yourself immersed in a great story. Granted takes 10+ playthroughs but that's besides the point.
 
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HazukiWolfe

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Actually most indies create their own assets, Unsighted is a good example here as Tiana is the sole pixel artist and programmer and the game looks manifique!! People go into RPG Maker half assed and generally lazy, which is why most RPG Maker games look well.. bad.



If you have a good story and base game/prototype you could probably request help as this does happen.

A story is only as good as the way it's presented, the story could be godly but if it's presented bad it could end up disastrous... Chrono Cross followed Trigger and there was no way it was going to surpass or even be as good but treat it as it's own game and you find yourself immersed in a great story. Granted takes 10+ playthroughs but that's besides the point.

This is what I'm really worried about. Me and my husband are putting our heart and soul into this game as it's something we have been wanting to do for a time. Two of the main characters mean a lot of me and him and we wanted to share the characters story.
 

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I think we all get this at some point or another. If you put this much effort into it, there's no real point in stopping. If it doesn't end well, treat it as a learning experience and make another game using that knowledge (easier said than done, I know).
Regarding the graphics themselves, I like what you have. Don't fall into the trap of redoing everything over and over. But anyway, with graphics in general, as much as I love custom ones, you really don't need to do it for the whole game. Most of the games you see with completely custom graphics are done by an entire team. With two people, you can't be expected to deliver up to that level. I have to remind myself all of the time that solo devs usually have really trashy graphics but quality gameplay, so even with what I've done from scratch (GUI, sprites, and portraits), I can still make a good game. Also, another thing I should note is just because the graphics are not made from scratch, doesn't mean they can't be played around with. Obviously, read the terms of use and everything, but if editing is allowed, then you can basically bend RTP and resource packs as far as you like. That's what I do for my maps when I don't feel like making tilesets, and they've gotten a fair bit of compliments.
 

HazukiWolfe

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I think we all get this at some point or another. If you put this much effort into it, there's no real point in stopping. If it doesn't end well, treat it as a learning experience and make another game using that knowledge (easier said than done, I know).
Regarding the graphics themselves, I like what you have. Don't fall into the trap of redoing everything over and over. But anyway, with graphics in general, as much as I love custom ones, you really don't need to do it for the whole game. Most of the games you see with completely custom graphics are done by an entire team. With two people, you can't be expected to deliver up to that level. I have to remind myself all of the time that solo devs usually have really trashy graphics but quality gameplay, so even with what I've done from scratch (GUI, sprites, and portraits), I can still make a good game. Also, another thing I should note is just because the graphics are not made from scratch, doesn't mean they can't be played around with. Obviously, read the terms of use and everything, but if editing is allowed, then you can basically bend RTP and resource packs as far as you like. That's what I do for my maps when I don't feel like making tilesets, and they've gotten a fair bit of compliments.

I always make sure if I could use the tile sets and see if I am able to edit them. If I dont see anything about if I can or cant edit them, I message the maker to see if it's ok.
 

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I don't make tileset. But I do make my own music. Even with that I still mix other's ppl music I put in my game because they're too good to miss it. I once had a dilemma as well. But in the end, I choose whatever that contribute the most to my game. No shame in using other's music even if you're a composer. No shame in using ppl's script even if you're scripter. No shame in using ppl's graphics resources even if you're an artist.

to those who have made games with others tilesets, was your finished game successful?
If I replace "tileset" with an arbitrary resource that comes from others (character set, music, script). Yes, I consider it a success.
It may not a well known, but hearing that some people sometimes replayed my game even after years passed, it feels something.

was it even worth it in the end?
Why won't it be worth it? At least when you finish a game, you get a "bragging right" that you finished your game. Every finished game is worth, even if it's small games. Not everyone is able to finish a game, even if it's a small game for whatever reason (usually because they're too perfectionist or keep expanding their game scale to the scale they will never finish). You gain experience, you know how to develop a game from start to finish. Ultimately, if it makes you happy, it's always worth it.
 

HazukiWolfe

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I don't make tileset. But I do make my own music. Even with that I still mix other's ppl music I put in my game because they're too good to miss it. I once had a dilemma as well. But in the end, I choose whatever that contribute the most to my game. No shame in using other's music even if you're a composer. No shame in using ppl's script even if you're scripter. No shame in using ppl's graphics resources even if you're an artist.


If I replace "tileset" with an arbitrary resource that comes from others (character set, music, script). Yes, I consider it a success.
It may not a well known, but hearing that some people sometimes replayed my game even after years passed, it feels something.


Why won't it be worth it? At least when you finish a game, you get a "bragging right" that you finished your game. Every finished game is worth, even if it's small games. Not everyone is able to finish a game, even if it's a small game for whatever reason (usually because they're too perfectionist or keep expanding their game scale to the scale they will never finish). You gain experience, you know how to develop a game from start to finish. Ultimately, if it makes you happy, it's always worth it.

I'm starting to see that my fears and worried were just that and nothing else. I am enjoying making this game and building its stories and characters. I guess I just got caught up in "what others want of MY game". It also didn't help when someone told me the idea of the games story was trash x.x but I dont talk to that person anymore
 

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Part of being an artist or author of any kind means having thick skin. You are exposing yourself whenever you create something, and people are going to (and should, and need to) criticize it. Some people do it constructively, some people don't. Some people try, but don't find the right words and are harsher than intended. Doesn't matter. This, above all else, is what creation requires: mental fortitude. The ability to bear the doubt.

If someone is too harsh on you, unfair, or tries to negatively remark on your work in order to negatively remark on YOU, then just ask yourself: what have they done? Have they had the strength to create something and submit it to review and critique? Where's THEIR game, novel, sprite work, et cetera? If they haven't even got as far as you have, what the hell do they know? Seriously, how weak and cowardly is it to sit back and take pot shots at others without bearing your own soul to the same thing?

Perhaps they have created something. But is it perfect? Has it been perfect in every iteration? Do they even understand the concept of a rough draft or "Stages" of a project? (Note: no art of any value has ever been good at its initial stages, ever, and if someone claims otherwise they're lying, stupid, or both.) Maybe they have had great products and great success... but if so, they certainly wouldn't be overly harsh on others. Honestly creating something changes people: they're no longer so insecure that they'll be able to call other people's concepts trash.

Remember the saying that goes something like: in the beginning, you're just shoveling sand for what will someday become a castle.
So basically, anyone who points at your sand and calls it "a bad castle" is an idiot.
 

HazukiWolfe

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Part of being an artist or author of any kind means having thick skin. You are exposing yourself whenever you create something, and people are going to (and should, and need to) criticize it. Some people do it constructively, some people don't. Some people try, but don't find the right words and are harsher than intended. Doesn't matter. This, above all else, is what creation requires: mental fortitude. The ability to bear the doubt.

If someone is too harsh on you, unfair, or tries to negatively remark on your work in order to negatively remark on YOU, then just ask yourself: what have they done? Have they had the strength to create something and submit it to review and critique? Where's THEIR game, novel, sprite work, et cetera? If they haven't even got as far as you have, what the hell do they know? Seriously, how weak and cowardly is it to sit back and take pot shots at others without bearing your own soul to the same thing?

Perhaps they have created something. But is it perfect? Has it been perfect in every iteration? Do they even understand the concept of a rough draft or "Stages" of a project? (Note: no art of any value has ever been good at its initial stages, ever, and if someone claims otherwise they're lying, stupid, or both.) Maybe they have had great products and great success... but if so, they certainly wouldn't be overly harsh on others. Honestly creating something changes people: they're no longer so insecure that they'll be able to call other people's concepts trash.

Remember the saying that goes something like: in the beginning, you're just shoveling sand for what will someday become a castle.
So basically, anyone who points at your sand and calls it "a bad castle" is an idiot.

Sometimes I do find myself worried about what others think and I dont think about the hard work I have done. I feel better with what you and others have said and I'm looking at my project again with excitement again.
 

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@HazukiWolfe , please avoid double posting, as it is against the forum rules. You can use the "Edit" function on your posts to add additional information you've forgotten or respond to multiple people. You can review our forum rules here. Thank you.


You don't need to quote a post for every response. If you want to address someone specifically, you can tag them by typing @ and their username, as I've done with yours above.

If you do need to quote more than one post, you click the quote button on each, then "Insert Quotes" to have them all in one reply.
 

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