Is it even worth it?

Discussion in 'General Discussion' started by HazukiWolfe, Jul 6, 2019.

  1. bgillisp

    bgillisp Global Moderators Global Mod

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    @kneel_before_ME : Books are no better though. I released a book in 2017 and I've made about $3000 so far from it in 2 years. Plus I think the low cost most devs ask is hurting them too as some see the low cost and think it is a cheap mobile game and don't even look further. One dev actually dared to ask $29.99 for an RPGMaker game, and they got a few of how come it is this much, but overall they seem to have done reasonably well from what I can tell.

    But...if we are honest about the numbers and how games go, even game studios in the 80's/90's didn't always made it big. One of them was interviewed years after they closed up shop and they said on average, 1 out of 10 games they made was a hit. 2 more went on to be moderate successes, and sold at least enough to cover development costs, but usually 7 out of 10 of their games didn't even make enough to cover the cost to make them, or were never finished for various reasons.

    So basically the takeaway is you need to make a LOT of games if you want to be successful. Each one builds up your audience too, and makes it more likely that future games will do better. But, the odds that your first game is a break-away hit that even covers costs...let's just say you'd probably have better odds putting all of that money on RED on a roulette wheel in a casino multiple times and hoping you win every time.
     
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    HexMozart88 likes this.
  2. HexMozart88

    HexMozart88 The Master of Random Garbage Veteran

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    Well, this got depressing REALLY quickly. A lot of arts related jobs are unstable, and there's never a guarantee that it's going to pay your bills. However, if everyone just gives up because you probably won't sell many copies, we're going to run out of games really quickly. I understand people want a stable job, but it kind of irritates me whenever people think they need to do something they don't like in order to be successful. The game dev industry, it looks like, requires a lot of creativity, not just with the game itself. If you can't make your own, freelance and get paid commission money. I think if you're fresh out of college, then it may be beneficial as a side job, but once you get going, I don't see a need to push it to the side.
     
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  3. Indinera

    Indinera Indie Dev Veteran

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    Correct.

    I did that in 2010. The game sold very well. B):rock-right:
     
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  4. bgillisp

    bgillisp Global Moderators Global Mod

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    @Indinera : That reminds me, I think when I bought Aveyond 1 in 2009 it was $29.99, and I think that was one of your best sellers too if I heard correctly.

    @HexMozart88 : Creativity is the key honestly. What I've done is all $$$ I sunk into my game I used money that it doesn't matter if I never see it back. Some of it came from my budget for buying games (use $49.99 to get a faceset vs a new game), and some of it I got by working extra hours at a job and banking that money for the game. But as an indie we probably shouldn't use $$$ that we need to pay our bills or to buy food to make our game.

    My point though is don't be disappointed if your first game isn't a hit. In fact, I figure I'm going to go treat myself to a nice steak dinner IF my game sells over 1000 copies.
     
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  5. Aesica

    Aesica undefined Veteran

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    It wouldn't surprise me, since around that time, RM wasn't as widespread as it seems to be today. While I've never played those games, they were probably the only RM games I was aware of in the commercial sector. Thinking back, I wasn't even aware of what engine they were using, just that they were "classic style RPGs." Now RM games show up on web game portals, steam, and everywhere else in between.

    Aaah, the joys of saturation.
     
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  6. Indinera

    Indinera Indie Dev Veteran

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    @bgillisp
    Aveyond in 2009 was 19.99 usd which was actually a pretty common price at the time.
     
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