Is it possible to make any money using Rpgmaker MV

Discussion in 'Commercial Games Discussion' started by starbrother, Oct 9, 2019.

  1. starbrother

    starbrother Villager Member

    Messages:
    6
    Likes Received:
    0
    First Language:
    english
    Primarily Uses:
    RMMV
    I''m looking into making money using this tool and I want to know the ins and outs of it. So far in my journeys it seems there is money to be made more with selling dlc and addons to the game itself than making games since the market is saturated. Are there any marketplaces for rpg maker games?
     
    #1
  2. EthanFox

    EthanFox Veteran Veteran

    Messages:
    307
    Likes Received:
    220
    First Language:
    English
    Primarily Uses:
    RMMV
    It is possible, yes - both for making games and for making DLC or addons, or doing things like sprite and art commissions to be used in other people's games.

    That being said, if you're asking whether RPG Maker MV is a good investment, one which you're likely to see a return on, the picture is a bit cloudier. A good game can sell well (because a good game made in any tool can sell well) but there are no guarantees. Speaking as a kindle author, this is no different to most other creative marketplaces; you could make something awesome but it doesn't mean it'll sell.

    I'd say if you like the idea of using RPG Maker or making tools for it, and think you'll enjoy it, then you should try and do that, and see if you make money. That's what I'm doing, and people are buying my game, which is helping me fund the next one. However, if you're looking for a "blue ocean" market to try and make a quick return, then it's probably not the best place.
     
    #2
  3. bgillisp

    bgillisp Global Moderators Global Mod

    Messages:
    12,304
    Likes Received:
    12,516
    Location:
    USA
    First Language:
    English
    Primarily Uses:
    RMVXA
    Yes, you can. I've made some $$$ off of my game which I released middle of last month. The trick is you need to find the audience and market to them, just like any other product.

    Now if you mean can you get rich off of it, probably not. But that's a risk with any venture, not just game making.
     
    #3
    Golden Unicorn Gaming likes this.
  4. Andar

    Andar Veteran Veteran

    Messages:
    28,640
    Likes Received:
    6,579
    Location:
    Germany
    First Language:
    German
    Primarily Uses:
    RMMV
    yes, you can make money from it exactly as said above - but that will NOT be "quick" money.
    what for example @bgillisp didn't mention are the years it took him to create that game.

    and you will need those years to get anything of quality done - because you can't sell anything that doesn't have at least some minimum quality.
    there were too many people who tried to sell bad games made with the RPG-Makers in the past, so the purchasers will look for quality before paying anything.
     
    #4
    Golden Unicorn Gaming likes this.
  5. Oddball

    Oddball Veteran Veteran

    Messages:
    1,660
    Likes Received:
    436
    First Language:
    English
    Primarily Uses:
    N/A
    Not to mention the years it takes to learn the engine. Iv'e had it sense 2013 or 2014. I can say iv'e gotten decent with making events and systems, but am no where near a master at it. I'm still learning new things all the time

    The best course of action (In my opinion) would be to first learn the engine inside and out, then release a game of high quality for free so people are more likley to play the game. Then (if your lucky), you'll have a SMALL following, and those people would be more likley to buy your game
     
    #5
    Golden Unicorn Gaming likes this.
  6. bgillisp

    bgillisp Global Moderators Global Mod

    Messages:
    12,304
    Likes Received:
    12,516
    Location:
    USA
    First Language:
    English
    Primarily Uses:
    RMVXA
    Right. I started my game in June 2014, and released it September 2019. So if I wanted a quick buck I'd have done better using those same hours working at minimum wage. Steam says I've spend 7,000 hours in the engine, so at minimum wage and at my selling price right now (after all cuts are taken care of)...I have to sell 5,583 copies to do better than if I had worked those same 7,000 hours at minimum wage in my country.

    Now granted some of those hours were me leaving the engine open while I did other things, and sometimes I slept with it still open when I was new, but even if I remove that and use 6,000 instead, it is still a lot of copies to sell to do better than minimum wage.

    And don't forget it is possible to sell a whole 9 copies of your game and that is it. We have one poster right now who says that is what they have sold, and they released last month too.
     
    #6
  7. Indinera

    Indinera Indie Dev Veteran

    Messages:
    1,735
    Likes Received:
    712
    Location:
    Europe
    First Language:
    French
    Many things to say to this topic...

    You need to explain to me how you can make more money selling DLC and addons for a game that didn't sell in the first place? (unless I misunderstood your use of the word "game" and you meant "software" instead?)

    My website. B):rock-right:

    You could make some hefty sums like only 3-4 years ago (or before that).
    Now is a bit trickier as the same-sized cake is divided in what seems an infinite amount of slices.
    There is always a better moment to do any given activity, and a worst moment. Now is probably the worst.
    For instance if you'd start an hair metal band in the middle of the 80's, you'd increase your chances to make good money. However if you'd make the same exact music (and marketing) while grunge was going strong, not so much.
    RM works kinda the same way and now it's in its "grunge period". :dizzy:

    Careful not to leave the software run while you're away though. :guffaw:

    Exactly! You might have put on more than 1000 extra though... depending how often you do that.
     
    Last edited: Oct 9, 2019
    #7
  8. Kes

    Kes Global Moderators Global Mod

    Messages:
    20,970
    Likes Received:
    10,663
    First Language:
    English
    Primarily Uses:
    RMVXA

    I've moved this thread to Commercial Games Discussion. Please be sure to post your threads in the correct forum next time. Thank you.


    It might be worth pointing out that no one is going to make much money selling addons and dlc for a game which only sold a relatively few copies in the first place. It seems to me that the priority should be making a game that people want to buy, and then worry about how to extend from there. Thinking about addons and dlc without a solid game already to hand seems to me to be putting the cart before the horse.
     
    #8
    Engr. Adiktuzmiko likes this.
  9. bgillisp

    bgillisp Global Moderators Global Mod

    Messages:
    12,304
    Likes Received:
    12,516
    Location:
    USA
    First Language:
    English
    Primarily Uses:
    RMVXA
    @Indinera : Well I think my Steam time is off anyways as it said I had 5000 hours after 1 year, which is almost mathematically impossible seeing as there are only 8760 hours in a year. So either the time got messed up or I almost never logged out for a few months.
     
    #9
  10. Indinera

    Indinera Indie Dev Veteran

    Messages:
    1,735
    Likes Received:
    712
    Location:
    Europe
    First Language:
    French
    Literally my first reaction xD

    Yeah it's hard to evaluate properly how long a game took to make.
    That said if a dev's only (or main) goal is to generate revenue, short dev time is definitely the key.
     
    #10
  11. bgillisp

    bgillisp Global Moderators Global Mod

    Messages:
    12,304
    Likes Received:
    12,516
    Location:
    USA
    First Language:
    English
    Primarily Uses:
    RMVXA
    @Indinera : That is so true. Which is why you can say I went against the trend with my game, but it was what I wanted to make. Still I keep joking my next game will be Harold Makes His Bed.

    @starbrother : To answer your question some more, there are a couple of devs who even made enough to go full time into game making. One of them is on this very thread. However, I'd say right now the odds you can do that in this market is very low so best thing to do is treat each game as an opportunity to build up an audience and try to expand it each game.
     
    #11
    Engr. Adiktuzmiko and Oddball like this.
  12. Shaz

    Shaz Veteran Veteran

    Messages:
    37,807
    Likes Received:
    11,512
    Location:
    Australia
    First Language:
    English
    Primarily Uses:
    RMMV
    But he's been at it for 12 years now and has a strong following/community. That wouldn't have been the case when he got started, and he got started when it was much easier to make money from this.

    Probably not much will happen with your first few games. Very, VERY few people make a game that's really successful early in their career. Be prepared for that - don't expect to be the exception to the rule. If that's what you turn out to be, it'll be a nice surprise.

    Go for more, smaller games instead of fewer, larger games, to get more players, and players who anticipate your next release. This is how you build a following.

    If the DLC and add-ons you're talking about are for the engine rather than a particular game, well, you might have some success. You probably have less competition than you would for a game, but you also have a smaller target audience. At least, in theory, DLC for the engine should be faster to produce than an actual commercial-worthy game. But it's still got to be good.
     
    #12
  13. Indinera

    Indinera Indie Dev Veteran

    Messages:
    1,735
    Likes Received:
    712
    Location:
    Europe
    First Language:
    French
    It was a very different time. For starters, Steam was cherry-picking its devs and I mean by that that 99.99% of the devs were turned down. You could make more than 100K a year and STILL Steam wouldn't allow you to release on its platform. They really went from one extreme to the other.
    But ultimately their standpoint at the time made it MUCH more complicated to generate big (and easy) income. Steam was the golden ticket, and your game really had to be complete sh*t not to sell on their platform circa 2010. But conversely if you weren't allowed in the privileged club, you had to WORK hard for your success.

    So was it easier than now? Yes and no. "No Steam" meant that you had to rely on yourself first and foremost for your success. I personally shine in that context but at the end of the day, it wasn't much different from now: most people weren't making a living out of their games, and income wasn't easy to get when you were on your own.

    The real easy period (aka when it was a great time to enter the game): 2014-2015 if you could find a way to pass Greenlight (get enough votes) or bypass it (publisher)... otherwise the few months after they dropped Greenlight and put Steam Direct instead (2016 I think).
    This was when any game could make some good $$$ and bundle websites were still going strong so, if you were lucky (I'm not), turn in big amounts.
    It was the "gold rush" of RM games.
    Before 2014, a no man's land, and after 2016, time's up ladies and gents. :stache:

    I'd say DLCs for a high seller like Ace or MV are probably a good idea but as you said, the material has to be good.
    You could also try to sell it as dev resources for any engine (so no longer a DLC), not sure if that'd make more or less sales though. You'd have to try.
     
    Last edited: Oct 9, 2019
    #13
    Golden Unicorn Gaming likes this.
  14. jkweath

    jkweath Goes Fast Veteran

    Messages:
    223
    Likes Received:
    214
    First Language:
    English
    Primarily Uses:
    N/A
    If your primary goal of using RPGMaker is to make money, then unless you enjoy the process of making RPGs, I'd recommend you look elsewhere for reasons already stated here. I don't say that out of malice - I feel like a lot of people find some of the older, more financially successful, 'basic' RPGM games on Steam, such as Cubicle Quest, Grayfox, or the Labyronia games, and tell themselves, "I can do better than that! ". I feel that way because I was one of those people when I first got started.

    It's easy to fall into the trap of believing that, if those games made so much money and they look so simple, well surely I could make a better one and make even more money, right? Probably not - many of those simple jRPGs were released during the "gold rush" @Indinera mentioned. That time has long passed, and while it's still possible to make money from using RPGMaker, it's a very long, slow grind--not for someone who's not into game development and all the nuance that goes into that, and definitely not for someone just looking to make a quick buck.

    There are plenty of 'modern' commercially successful games made with RPG Maker, such as LISA or One Shot or To The Moon, but they're the exception, not the norm. Those games were made by people with more experience, longer timeframes and higher budgets. Look through the list of games tagged RPGMaker on Steam and scroll past the first page. I imagine you'll quickly find what the actual norm is.

    Just to use myself as an example, I played RPG Maker PSX for many years as a young teen, then spent many more months just fiddling with RPG XP, VX Ace, and finally MV before I decided to get serious. I probably had 3 years of RPG making experience when I started on my first commercial game, and that game took another 9 months to create and sell.

    That game is about to hit its 2 year anniversary, and it still hasn't passed $1,000 in gross revenue. Look around on these boards and you'll definitely find that I'm not alone in having such poor sales for a first game release. Thankfully, I enjoy RPG Making almost as I do playing video games, so it wasn't hard for me to give it another go, and another after that - now my fifth game is releasing in a little under a month.

    My income from game development, though, is only enough so far to pay my utilities every month - which is great, but remember that it took me four years worth of experience to reach this point. Are you willing to put in that amount of effort?

    (If you can write simplified chinese and draw porn, ignore everything I mentioned above)
     
    #14
  15. bgillisp

    bgillisp Global Moderators Global Mod

    Messages:
    12,304
    Likes Received:
    12,516
    Location:
    USA
    First Language:
    English
    Primarily Uses:
    RMVXA
    @jkweath : Wait...Mari and the Black Tower was your game? I still need to play it!

    On another note, the price and the audience determines things too. For instance I've made almost 1K already in sales on mine. Of course, I also spent that much on the soundtrack and art so I'm still in the negative a little, but honestly? I figured my first game will probably run a small loss as no one knows me and my games from developer #425662 out there.

    My suggestion is this: If you want to make a commercial game, go for it. BUT...don't spend money on it that you can't afford to never get back. All $$$ I spent on mine I earned by working extra hours at work first, then using that to fund the soundtrack and art. If I never see that money back, I'll be just fine as all bills are paid, food is on the table, and I didn't go into debt to make the game.

    But, if you need the money now I'd at least work another job too to get something, as it will be a few months before you see any income from game making, especially if you are just starting now.
     
    #15
  16. TWings

    TWings The Dragon Whisperer Veteran

    Messages:
    362
    Likes Received:
    633
    Location:
    Kyoto
    First Language:
    French
    Primarily Uses:
    RMMV
    If you're after money, you'd probably have better luck working on 3D games using Unity or UE4 (or making some pay to win smartphone multiplayer games). Worst case, you'd eventually get the knowledge to find a job in a proper game making company.
    RPG Maker made RPGs are targetting a very limited audience and as others already mentioned, the market is quite saturated nowdays.
     
    #16
  17. jkweath

    jkweath Goes Fast Veteran

    Messages:
    223
    Likes Received:
    214
    First Language:
    English
    Primarily Uses:
    N/A
    @bgillisp yeah it is, though I'd recommend playing the Android version if you have a good Android phone. When I worked on re-releasing it on the play store, I completely revamped the game's dialogue as what I had before didn't live up to my standards now. The Android version hasn't made as much as the Steam version, but it's at least a little more consistent. A lot of people buy it after playing Knight Bewitched, which is still my best seller especially on Android.
     
    #17
    Golden Unicorn Gaming likes this.
  18. BlueMage

    BlueMage Slime Lv99 Veteran

    Messages:
    116
    Likes Received:
    147
    First Language:
    English
    Primarily Uses:
    RMVX
    @jkweath just how fast did you develop a game? lol, you already about to release another game? Your last game had released just like... 14 months ago
     
    #18
  19. Kes

    Kes Global Moderators Global Mod

    Messages:
    20,970
    Likes Received:
    10,663
    First Language:
    English
    Primarily Uses:
    RMVXA
    @BlueMage this is getting very close to derailing the topic. Maybe a pm if there is no game thread yet?
     
    #19
  20. Indinera

    Indinera Indie Dev Veteran

    Messages:
    1,735
    Likes Received:
    712
    Location:
    Europe
    First Language:
    French
    14 months is nothing special.
    I released 6 games in 2009 alone.
    It helped a lot launch my career back then.
     
    #20
    BlueMage likes this.

Share This Page