Looking for ideas for a before-and-after benchmark test before upgrading nw.js

HankB

Actual size
Veteran
Joined
Mar 5, 2021
Messages
115
Reaction score
64
First Language
English
Primarily Uses
RMMV
EDIT: (tl;dr: I'm stress-testing RMMV, so what are some commonly used functions/event commands that seem to use a lot of resources and slow things down?)

I'm getting ready to upgrade my MV installation with a newer version of nw.js (as per this post). But before I do, I'd really like to do a "before and after" comparison, based on FPS rates, so I can get a somewhat accurate and measurable indication of how much the upgrade actually helped. A lot of people report that the upgrade helped a lot (like a lot lot), but I'd like some actual numbers.

The general idea is that I create a map that gradual becomes more and more of a resource hog. As that is happening, I constantly check the framerate, and whenever it drops below 30, I record a log of exactly at what point that happened and then start over again. I do this 100 times and then average the results together.

Here's what I have so far: I'm using Galv's Event Spawner to gradually spawn in events into a blank map. The event that is spawned in is just a dragon that flies around randomly, but it's a parallel process that is also doing some math and checking a conditional branch, like:

Control Variable : #1 = Random 1..2000
If variable #1 > 1000
Control Variable : #1 = Random 1..2000
else
Control Variable : #1 = Random 1..2000
end

and it just does this over and over. Obviously, as each new event is spawned in, it becomes a heavier load on the game. Whenever enough dragons are spawned in that it causes the FPS to drop below 30, the player is transferred to another map, which logs the number of events that were spawned in, and then transfers the player back to the testing map. This happens 100 times, and then you are given an average of how many events were spawned in per cycle.

Currently, for me, I'm averaging about 170 events spawned in before my frame rate drops below 30. Of course, it will be different for different computers, which is kind of the point. I want to create a test that others can use before they upgrade so that they can see how much of a difference it makes on their own systems.

I feel like this method would probably give users a pretty good idea of how much of a performance increase they are getting after the upgrade, but the problem is that it's completely based on the number of visible, active events that are on the map at once. And, yes, those events are moving around, and doing some math and conditional checks, but I don't think that those things are very intensive.

What are some other, more greedy event commands I should check? Any advice would be greatly appreciated. Thanks.
 
Last edited:

Syberduh

Veteran
Veteran
Joined
Jul 26, 2021
Messages
31
Reaction score
19
First Language
English
Primarily Uses
RMMZ
Displaying/moving/scaling pictures?
 

Frostorm

[]D[][]V[][]D
Veteran
Joined
Feb 22, 2016
Messages
2,370
Reaction score
1,985
First Language
English
Primarily Uses
RMMV
Did you ever end up doing those comparison tests?
 

Latest Threads

Latest Profile Posts

It's definitely discouraging when streamers give a try-to-say-it-nicely (i.e. bad) review of your game demo. It's like jumping into a cold pool. Bad initally, but it gets better with time. And you are now more alert and see better.
Some screenshots of the pub and lodging with the beginnings of clutter taking shape
TTp8uCw.png

jtC202e.png

bSXgyVl.png

eRx9PUF.png
Backgrounds are not my strong suit... :kaodes:
DazI8jt.jpg

Just realized I forgot doing the clouds... woops
Went to get some stuff for February 10, the birthday of my favorite ink monster...
I have a little one-person party for Bendy every year, complete with the life-size plushie I made. And yes, I bake a birthday cake!

Forum statistics

Threads
118,498
Messages
1,116,409
Members
155,493
Latest member
maxboop
Top