Moral Compass of RPG Characters

What kind of morality you find interesting for a character?


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Frostorm

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True neutral is the philosophy that harmony and freedom are both important in society and that altruism and egoism are both legitimate ends.
I think it is like @trouble time thinking about the master of both worlds for positive aspects, but the negative is your NPCs.

Still, True Neutral's not personally committed to upholding good in any abstract or universal way.
Some neutral characters, on the other hand, commit themselves philosophically to neutrality.
Lol, I know what it is, but I can't think of many character examples that fit this category. Even less so for real-life individuals.

@gstv87 Hmm, that's a good way to approach it. Quests could be written in a completely optional manner. But the split choices are inevitably going to add to the workload, as is the case for any game featuring multiple dialogue options or branching stories.

@The Stranger, https://www.quotev.com/quiz/12844554/What-is-your-DnD-alignment 7 Questions if you do not want the long questions. lol
Chaotic Neutral

"The Nomad"

These people value their freedom, and will do anything to keep it. Even though they may lash out at people who restrict them, they do not believe in doing evil.
 
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Kupotepo

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Now, I get the Lawful Good, @Frostorm, I want to be a freedom fighter so much.:kaosalute:

You're "all good" in every sense of the phrase. You wear your altruism like a badge, and it looks great on you! You see no problem sacrificing your own comfort for the sake of others. Why? Because you know it's the right thing to do. Your only moral dilemma is bending the rules to appease natural logic.


The question is still remains: do you think the small positive change is still impactful like the big change? Like @gstv87 example, he doesn't have to play as the lord and conquer the world? He just feel bad already with one man being dead.
 
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Frostorm

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Now, I get the Lawful Good, @Frostorm, I want to be a freedom fighter so much.:kaosalute:

You're "all good" in every sense of the phrase. You wear your altruism like a badge, and it looks great on you! You see no problem sacrificing your own comfort for the sake of others. Why? Because you know it's the right thing to do. Your only moral dilemma is bending the rules to appease natural logic.


The question is still remains: do you think the small positive change is still impactful like the big change? Like @gstv87 example, he doesn't have to play as the lord and conquer the world? He just feel bad already with one man being dead.
Wait what? I'm definitely not Law Good lol. I mention my friend was Lawful Good. I'm pretty far off from Lawful Good tbh.:kaoangry:
 

Kupotepo

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Waifus69

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reminds me of a session in Oblivion:
I was playing a character who largely resembled a private detective, and my mission was to interrogate "the town's madman", who thought there was a conspiracy against him. I found him, I talked to him, and was given the option to leave him be, arrest him up front, or play along, so I chose to play along hoping to loosen his tongue.
He ended up recruiting me to spy on the town for him and try to figure out who was against him. He paid me some coin each time, so I didn't worry.
*I* was in control of the flow of the narrative there.... nothing would happen as long as I decided to not hurt anyone, and nobody suspected me.
Parallel to that, I was supposed to inform the watch commander if this guy became a problem, so, as long as I didn't think he was a problem, everything would be alright.
Until he decided to ask me to kill everyone who was involved in this "conspiracy". So that's where I drew the line, and blew the whistle on him. I went to get the guards, and they ended up killing him.
I thought they were going to arrest him, and when I saw them attacking him I tried to stop them, but I was too late.
I felt bad after that, because everything could have been solved without the guy dying.... he wasn't going to kill anyone by himself, he was just crazy.
My character had always been one to never use violence unless for defense, or as a last resource.... I was a spy, not an assassin. And I indirectly caused that guy to die, because nobody thought it would be adequate to make the guards *arrest* the guy instead of *killing* him on the spot, which is what a sane guard would do.
Implying that Oblivion guards are anything but sane.
 

JMsoup

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I don't really like this system as its quite restrictive, with only 9 playstyles. I always get annoyed at D&D when people tell me I can't do something because I'm Lawful or Good. There's a system me and my friends made up on a 0-5 scale, with some elements taken from the D&D system.

Morality: How convicted is the character to his values? For example, if the character is vegetarian and he finds a special meat that when consumed, gives him unlimited power. Will he eat it?

Sociopath: How guilty the character usually feels if he does something generally 'bad' or breaks his morals.

Lawful: How much the character adheres to the law of the land, not their own morals. This is fun because it causes conflict with the Morality part.

Impulsiveness: How much the character thinks before acting. Low impulsiveness might lead to hesitation while high may have the character randomly jump into fights and arguments.

Confrontational: How much the character likes to face problems head on rather than avoid.

The DM and players are not allowed to look at each other's character sheet and so cannot police the others' actions. This scale is for the player to refer to his own character for his own role-play purposes only.

We put these on our NPCs as well with a special skill 'Read Heart' that allows the user to see the NPC's morality and allow the players to act accordingly.

This causes fun little surprises to shake things up. For example, one of the characters who always followed the law suddenly stole something because the player did his own impulsiveness check (no DM involved) and it failed.
 

Black Pagan

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I would love to see Games being made around these Characters :
- Characters who are Borderline Evil but cling on to the Heroes for some odd reason
- Characters who are Rebels and end up harming or pissing off their own Team members
- Characters who Free and Innocent and treat even Evil Villains like Friends
 

Kupotepo

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Update Questions: How do you create a relative moral system or personal philosophy of each character in your writing or your game? [Really sorry, I do not think about how powerful the ramification.] I said writing part because the great writer likes to surprise game players.
What I saw the morality system is either based on the political alignment of each character, psychology mindset or whatever deity the character worship like D&D or WoW.
And thought? Innovative people here :kaothx:



Because sometimes character's personalities and morality are at odds. That is why there is internal conflict.
"Research shows that even babies prefer those who are nice to others compared to those who are neutral or mean. Moreover, babies prefer those who behave positively toward others who are nice. And babies avoid those who behave positively toward others who are mean."

"Cross-cultural research suggests that it is a general principle of morality, a “cognitive universal”, that people consider both intentions and outcomes."

According to the moral dyad theory, when individuals perceive harm, they seek to complete the moral dyad by identifying a victim and a perpetrator.

The desire to discourage bad behavior is more powerful than the urge to encourage positive behavior.
One implication is that people closely scrutinize cases where something good has occurred before giving moral praise. And people are quicker to rush to moral judgment and assign moral blame when something bad has happened.
[
Joshua Knobe, an experimental philosopher at Yale University.]

Power of Impression, not morality as objective. Yikes, people like to combine major subjects together.
:kaojoy:

@JMsoup, thank you for your input.
@Black Pagan, thank you for input.
 
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Frostorm

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So I found this and thought it might be interesting to share...thoughts? (I didn't create this)

It's actually annoying cuz now I don't know what alignment to make my INTJ/INFJ hybrid character... I'm also confused since I'm personally a borderline INTJ/INFJ myself but am also distinctly "Chaotic Neutral". Hmm, what do...

Edit: Screw that chart...I found this post:
True INTJ’s are typically Chaotic Neutral.

What seems “chaotic” in the context of alignment is an INTJ’s intuitive habit of analyzing a situation and advocating the correct response for that situation. Not necessarily the appropriate response. To others this can seem capricious, when they aren’t privy to the machinations of an INTJ mind.

Chaotic Neutral- A chaotic neutral character follows his whims. He is an individualist first and last. He values his own liberty but doesn't strive to protect others' freedom. He avoids authority, resents restrictions, and challenges traditions. A chaotic neutral character does not intentionally disrupt organizations as part of a campaign of anarchy. To do so, he would have to be motivated either by good (and a desire to liberate others) or evil (and a desire to make those different from himself suffer). A chaotic neutral character may be unpredictable, but his behavior is not totally random. He is not as likely to jump off a bridge as to cross it. Chaotic neutral is the best alignment you can be because it represents true freedom from both society's restrictions and a do-gooder's zeal. However, chaotic neutral can be a dangerous alignment when it seeks to eliminate all authority, harmony, and order in society.
Which at least matches my own personality. /shrug

I think the term Lawful and Chaotic needs to be slightly defined...as in does it refer to order from society's perspective or one's own perspective? INTJs tend to adhere to a well-defined set of morals/code of conduct, which may or may not align with the values of society.

So my question is: Does this adherence to said internal morals/code of conduct count as Lawful (due to maintaining order internally) or Chaotic (due to disregarding society's values)?
 
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Kupotepo

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@Frostorm, by the way, I just read about this right now lol. Not an expert on the D&D aliment system.

[I think = opinion, not a fact, lol] @Frostorm helps me explain to them.
I think if truly believe in that moral code, you are lawful. Remember I get lawful. Lawful people are happy to follow the law as long as the laws do not violent the natural law of morality. The bubble will burst too just like a chaotic person. This person likes to understand the concept of the social contract.

Chaotic people like changing a lot and don't like the authorities due to bad experience. See the injustice of the system. You are really like the concept of individual freedom. How does anyone know the end result of rebellion? Good or bad outcome no one knows.
 
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Pootscooter

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@Kupotepo I think you missed @Frostorm's question. It's something I'm wondering as well. He asked:
So my question is: Does this adherence to said internal morals/code of conduct count as Lawful (due to maintaining order internally) or Chaotic (due to disregarding society's values)?
The keyword to note is internal. As in the character is strictly following his/her own code/morals, which may or may not align with society. So is this person Lawful or Chaotic?
 

The Stranger

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@Kupotepo Depends what you mean by lawful. Obeying your moral code even if it means breaking the law? Obeyng the law even if it means breaking your moral code? Both are lawful, because both have you strictly adhering to a set of rules or laws.

Morals need not reflect what society judges to be right or wrong, either. Someone may live by a very rigid moral code, but the morals they hold might be very warped or just different from those around them.

Chaotic people are no more rebellious and perceptive of injustices than lawful characters. It all depends on where they are, and who they're interacting with. Lawful characters can lead a rebellion and fight for justice depending on the laws they're actually following. The devout might only be truly lawful to the laws of their chosen deity, but not to the realm they live within; this is true for many religious folk around the world, who are loyal first to God\their gods, and the state second. They wouldn't be chaotic for not fully obeying the law of the land, they'd be lawful for observing the laws of their faith.

I don't think anyone can really fit in these categories all of the time, if at all.
 

Kupotepo

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The keyword to note is internal. As in the character is strictly following his/her own code/morals, which may or may not align with society. So is this person Lawful or Chaotic?
I think the morality superceded the law. So that person is still lawful if the law doesn't serve justice. The law is not always equal justice, correct? I think it is internalize process.
 

Kupotepo

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You have to remember laws don't have to serve justice. That's why there's a Lawful Evil category. Plus "justice" isn't absolute, just like there's no true right or wrong.
After I realized that, that is why I changed the questions. lol on top with the orange highlighted.
Update Questions: How do you create a relative moral system or personal philosophy of each character in your writing or your game? [Really sorry, I do not think about how powerful the ramification.] I said writing part because the great writer likes to surprise game players.
 

The Stranger

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To add to what @Pootscooter said, laws, technically, are always just, and breaking them is always unjust. When we see an unjust law it's because we, as individuals, view them as unfair. Perhaps they're oppressive laws, or they conflict with our own personal moral codes. Regardless of how moral a law is, it still makes you just for obeying it, and unjust for disobeying it. Stealing to feed yourself might be justifiable to yourself and others, but it's still unlawful. Don't confuse justice with what is right and wrong on an ethical level.
 

Pootscooter

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So in conclusion, would a character that ignores the laws of society, but adheres to their own moral code be considered Lawful or Chaotic? Or maybe Neutral?
 

Kupotepo

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@Kupotepo Depends what you mean by lawful. Obeying your moral code even if it means breaking the law? Obeyng the law even if it means breaking your moral code? Both are lawful, because both have you strictly adhering to a set of rules or laws.
@The Stranger, remember I do not create the D&D system. I read it and ask for the questions. I do not agree with it. :kaojoy:

So in conclusion, would a character that ignores the laws of society, but adheres to their own moral code be considered Lawful or Chaotic? Or maybe Neutral?
I am not fighting with you. I try to understand it myself. :kaothx:
Not an expert on the D&D aliment system.
I do not understand as much as you do.

@The Stranger, I do not play D&D games do not know.:kaosigh: I just think about adding it to my game cosmology.
 
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The Stranger

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@Kupotepo Don't paladins need to strictly follow the laws of their patron deities in order to have access to their paladin powers? They don't need to be lawful to a nation's laws, unless one of the laws of their god says that's what they must do. I think that's how it goes, anyway. lol.
 

Kupotepo

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@The Stranger, thank you @trouble time for this because she plays the D&D game.

This is because every character was meant to be religious in some way, this was diluted when the paladin was added to the game though. This is because paladins represented a specific specialized order, and clerics were basically preists. Clerics before this were basically everything the paladin is now, just better at casting and a bit worse at fighting. The reason I say diluted is that it implies religiousicy confers divine spell casting whereas before Clerics were specifically chosen champions of the faith where adding paladins to fill that roll meant clerics were less "The choosen ones" and more "yeah I guess anyone that believes hard enough can have magic"
 

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