Neurodivergence & Coding

Ratatattat

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Hi there! I'm sure many have seen me post around for the past year or so maybe, but to more thoroughly introduce myself for the context of this thread: I am a 25yo female who was diagnosed with Autism and ADHD at age 9, and OCD just within the past year or two.

I started thinking about a possible predisposed aptitude for things like coding among people like me, maybe a few months ago after having a particular realization: the way I tend to think is already very similar to the general logic of coding (for lack of a better way to word that).

As an example (and I think this mental behavior likely comes from the OCD), the way my brain handles making wishes. For context, I *feel* superstitious about making wishes even though I'm not actually. The worst of this is the overwhelming panic I feel at a certain terrible "wish" that likes to intrusively pop into my head and needs "correcting" quite literally every few seconds throughout the day for the past like 3 years now (yeah DW I've got a therapist on it).

But the most innocuous is the "just in case" desire to consciously make some good wish whenever I see, say, the first star of the night or 11:11 on the clock, etc. For these occasions, since as long as I can remember, I've always had these super elaborate wishes with lots of details (again, probably an OCD thing - making sure to cover ALL my bases to avoid any "careful what you wish for" moments, probably), and I would have one particular wish I would latch onto and use for all of these occasions for a while. These long, convoluted wishes, once "defined" so to speak, would thenceforth be thought in exactly the same order of words every time (again, OCD haha). It might be something ridiculous like:

"I wish Santa would bring me a pony for Christmas and Daddy and Uncle Cory would build a stable in the unused corner of our yard and someone would come feed and groom and walk it to keep it healthy when I don't feel like it but I can come ride and take care of it whenever I want" - or some BS like that, haha.

Well... this got so extremely tiresome to repeat word-for-word every single time, that I ended up dubbing it "The Pony Wish". Like, I would literally sit there, think out the entire wish word-for-word, and then tell the universe or something that this is "The _____ Wish". From then on, I would just think "I wish The Pony Wish" (or whichever wish it was) and feel confident that the universe knew exactly what I meant, because I had made sure to explicitly define it for future reference.

I mean... come on, "The Pony Wish" was a variable.

const thePonyWish = 'I Wish Santa would bring me a pony for Christmas and . . . ';
const makeWish = function(wish) { return wish; };
makeWish(thePonyWish);

:LZSlol:

Aside from quite literally mentally "defining variables" for myself since childhood, I generally have a highly "break-it-down-and-look-at-its-parts-then-build-back-up" problem-solving type brain, and this is where I suspect more Autistic influence.

We have a disagreement? Why do you think that way, and why do I think this way? Why do we each believe our respective reasons in the first place? Why do we believe THOSE reasons? How far can we trace back down the tree of where our beliefs are coming from until we find the point where our underlying assumptions/priorities diverge from each other? In other words, if we can reconcile that underlying split point, would one of us jump to the other's "branch of reasoning", or at least be better able to understand the other? Or, in other words, how many "functions" do we have to trace back through to find the discrepancy that's causing our current functions of interest to return different values?

I learned piano by associating the piano keys with letters (e.g. C, D, E, etc.)? Well, then my brain can now never understand or pick up on reading "actual" sheet music, because translating visual notes to letter notes to piano keys just adds an extra unnecessary step to the process and slows down my mental processing to the point I can hardly play. Or, in other words, var note = C; var letter = note; var key = letter; is stupid and redundant when I can just cut out a step and do var letter = C; var key = letter;. Why would I learn a whole third method of reading music if it means I'll have to mentally pass the information through an additional function for the same result?

Pair this general realization about my own thinking with something my dad (a computer guy, who also suspects he is Autistic) has said, that "Autistic and OCD people make the best coders/developers/project managers/problem-solvers/etc." (paraphrased), and I started wondering if that is true. If perhaps the way that the average neurodivergent brain works and processes information truly tends to be more similar to the way you have to think as a coder (obviously a generalization - there is so much variety amongst neurodivergent brains just as amongst neurotypical brains). That perhaps this is why it's been so easy to pick up on for me, like immersing myself in another country and picking up their language. Like I just have to plug in the new grammar rules and vocabulary, and my brain already knows what to do with it, and the process of forming sentences and paragraphs after that point just comes naturally because I already think that way in daily life.

Coding really does feel more like literature to me than mathematical in any way. It's somewhere in-between, like more structured than writing, but less restrained than math. It's patterned enough to be easily learned, but still flexible enough to be limitless. My brain likes. A lot.

So, I'm curious, what do you guys think? Do any non-divergent people feel the same way about coding as I do? Is your brain more similar to mine than I thought, and perhaps it's not a neurodivergent thing after all? Do any other neurodivergents experience coding, or even just my general patterns of thought, similarly? Or does your brain work wildly differently?
 

Mike-Turtle

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Interesting read and query. I fall on the neurodivergent spectrum and people often ask if I code better because of it.

Code better?

I mean... my code is an untidy mess, I break all sorts of standard practices, I vary wildly in the way and amount I note my code, I write whole pages of code and can instantly look at it and wonder what any of it means; sometimes never understanding it again, I write hundreds of character lines, I don't think I've ever used a semicolon to mark the end of anything, I label my variables wildly, and I just don't care about anything most coders seem to.

However, I write most of my code in head while not at my computer, so that's a bonus I guess.

I started coding late (35) and found it hard to pick up, but now I find it easier and more fun than writing English (dyslexia). I don't know whether being neurodivergent helped or hindered, but I definitely don't seem to suffer from the same issues I have while writing English: another bonus.

It does make me wonder if to everyone else, writing paragraphs like these (about 12 red lines so far), is how I find coding though?
 

Ratatattat

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I write whole pages of code and can instantly look at it and wonder what any of it means; sometimes never understanding it again
Hah, yeah, I've churned out a couple whole systems in a day or weekend before that end up working fine, but lord help me if I ever want to make any changes to one, because as soon as I look at it again I'll be like "what the f*** was going through my head and why was any of this necessary?" - but it was necessary, for some reason, because if I change or remove it, it breaks it lol. I just never know why again.

However, I write most of my code in head while not at my computer, so that's a bonus I guess.
^^^^^^^^^^^^ This too! I've been coding in my head in class and at work, and on the plane a couple times this summer. If it's little enough I can usually remember it by lunchtime (I bring my laptop with me) or the end of the day, but if it gets to be a lot I'll grab a notepad and start writing it out (sometimes properly, sometimes shorthand) to make sure I don't forget it.

I'm not sure if this is neurodivergent behavior though, or just "coder brain" in general haha.

WIN_20220811_12_53_21_Pro.jpgWIN_20220811_12_54_12_Pro.jpg

But yeah, IDK about coding "better" - I know I also don't abide by some of the "best practices" I do know about, and don't even know what many more of them are, haha. I'm sure my code is a mess and would be sloppy and incomprehensible to anyone else... but if it works, it works! :kaohi: It's just a reflection of the chaos of my mindscape, but it works!
 

Mike-Turtle

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So long as it works :)

I genuinely start each project/new system with the desire to be a 'better' more tidy coder, but once I start typing I just forget and keep going until my wife makes me eat or drink something. Then I tend to notice the pages of chaos :D

But as you say: it works... so meh!
 

Ratatattat

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The important part about coding is being able to comprehend instructing something that will interpret everything you tell it literally
In my experience some autistic people have difficulty comprehending metaphors and abstraction
You know, this could very well be it! But then...
which may result in code being very thorough and complex, but at the same time could be optimized down to a much simpler and less complicated function
...also this, for sure, which would explain the chaos :kaoswt2: I'm always speculating potential edge cases, trying to preemptively prevent bugs, etc... would definitely be better to just make the damn thing straight from Point A to Point Z first, and then go back to test/fix.

Sadly, I write (actual stories) this way, too. I've been working on trying to separate my revision brain/process from my drafting brain/process. It's hard, with every eventual aspect of the piece swirling about my head all at the same time haha.

79-focus.png
Oh my goodness, this is the most relatable thing all day haha :LZSlol: I've started to see many memes and posts/articles about a developer's focus lately. My dad said something like the average person's time it takes to return to focus after an interruption is like 15 minutes or something while a dev/coder takes an hour to return to their "flow state"... so I looked that up and couldn't find anywhere he might have gotten "an hour" from, however I did find many articles citing that it does take coders longer, some sources saying almost 30 minutes. And of course a plethora of relatable memes like this one came out of that rabbit hole.

But yeah, the more complex and disorganized the thought process, the more devastating this "poof" is, for sure :kaoswt:
 

ATT_Turan

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The important part about coding is being able to comprehend instructing something...Though it overlaps with some autistic people's way of thinking, it's more like two buckets of paint thrown at the same wall rather than a venn diagram.
I'm inclined to agree with this. There are plenty of people who are naturally logical thinkers and are (as far as I know) not neurodivergent.

Also, the ability to write code well can, demonstrably, be taught. I doubt that is teaching computer science students to be, for example, autistic :wink:

However, in your case, @Ratatattat, it's entirely possible that your specific quirks do help you with these fields. Just as someone with savant syndrome can be highly talented in a specific area, your mental processes may well help you to comprehend and plan your coding. I just don't think it's necessarily a universal or widespread truth.
 

HexMozart88

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You see, I'm autistic and garbage at coding because I'm also very stubborn and don't do "best practices" very much.
 

gstv87

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possible predisposed aptitude for things like coding among people like me
bullshit.

don't believe all of that "predisposition" crap that the medical scene likes to throw around so much.
if you really want to understand what autism is (or any kind of mental illness, or any illness at all) you have to understand how the body works.
nobody knows it 100%.... and that's a fact.
and the medical establishment knows it, and they tremble when that fact is brought up: they can't know how to cure mental illnesses, because they don't understand the brain.
the moment they understand the brain, the concept of "self" is reduced to a bunch of chemical equations, and everyone's business is over.

there is no "predisposition" to anything.
programming, analysis, design, any kind of discipline with a requirement for abstract thought will be influenced by how *YOU* can think, and the way *YOU* think is dictated by your chemical reactions, and the reason for that is in your DNA, which is given by your parents, and shaped by your environment.
nobody is ever "born" a genius.
you may be *born slightly above the average in terms of mental capacity* but you're most definitely *made* a genius by the environment you live in.
genius, Olympic swimmer with twice the lung capacity, sprinter who can run 100m dash in 8 seconds, weightlifter with the strength of a locomotive, ... random psychopath, or politician... you name it.
everyone is shaped by their environment.
if you can process harder concepts, it's because your brain works in overdrive.
why? I can't tell for sure, but maybe your blood oxygenates quicker, or your metabolism is more efficient, so your brain eats everything you throw at it.
the same explanation can be given in reverse: a person with an intellect deficit has a faulty brain, for the same reasons.

don't be "diagnosed" with anything without asking what's the cause for it.
because if you don't step away from the cause, the cure is useless... especially when "there is no cure" for "a condition" such as autism, which is not such.



"Do you have a second?"
me: "No."
(keeps working)
 

Ratatattat

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programming, analysis, design, any kind of discipline with a requirement for abstract thought will be influenced by how *YOU* can think, and the way *YOU* think is dictated by your chemical reactions, and the reason for that is in your DNA, which is given by your parents, and shaped by your environment.
if you can process harder concepts, it's because your brain works in overdrive.
why? I can't tell for sure, but maybe your blood oxygenates quicker, or your metabolism is more efficient, so your brain eats everything you throw at it.

Well, um... this kind of thing is exactly what I MEANT by "predisposed", so... :kaoswt2:

EDIT:
Relevant definition of predispose: "make someone liable or inclined to a specified attitude, action, or condition"

Saying someone has a predisposition to something is not saying they're already great at that thing, or even necessarily ever will be. Just that, exactly as you said, certain factors (whether knowable or unknowable) may contribute to that thing being easier or more likely for the person in question. In this case, the factors at hand are qualities that may stem from whatever neurodivergent "condition" someone has, in my case being my natural thought processing patterns, which basically in themselves are the predisposition - of course, they may not be a strictly "Autistic" thing, which is why this is open to discussion :kaohi:

As another example, it is known that being tall predisposes someone to being better at basketball than others. That doesn't mean they are good at it, or ever will be. But that, if they do pick it up and get good at it, it's more likely that their height will allow them to be better at it than shorter people. That's all - a "predisposition" is more like a likelihood/advantage, not a prophecy.
 
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gstv87

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my natural thought processing patterns
you mean *common sense*?

if you're good at overthinking things, you would also be good at counseling and prosecuting: big chunks of written statements with crossed concepts and references that need to be navigated on the spot, for loopholes.

"predisposition" is wrongfully used to "diagnose" things that shouldn't be a problem.
they're only a problem when they would help bring about the solution to the one problem that is the system keeping people from solving the one problem.
that is, that people should ask more "what's the problem" and less "what's the solution to this".
"you're sick! take this pill".... yeah, but *why* is the person sick? what's causing it?
"well, the symptoms are...." yeah, of the thing you already know is there! what is *behind* it?! how did this get to be!?
 

TheoAllen

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Either I've just got dyslexia from reading your post or my English isn't good enough. I don't seem to get the point of your first half of the post. But I think I know what you're trying to tell in the second half.

Mental condition aside, instead of labeling them as Neurodivergence, OCD, or Autism (I believe labels will only put you in a cage), I would label them as "critical thinking" (or in a label that most people hate, it's "talent"). It is indeed an important trait that programmers should have.

If I would have to nitpick, no, Autistic and OCD don't act as a sole factor for good managers. So, don't think "because I have OCD, I could be a good manager". They need social skills and managing people as well. A lot of factors are in play.

We have a disagreement? Why do you think that way, and why do I think this way? Why do we each believe our respective reasons in the first place? Why do we believe THOSE reasons? How far can we trace back down the tree of where our beliefs are coming from until we find the point where our underlying assumptions/priorities diverge from each other? In other words, if we can reconcile that underlying split point, would one of us jump to the other's "branch of reasoning", or at least be better able to understand the other? Or, in other words, how many "functions" do we have to trace back through to find the discrepancy that's causing our current functions of interest to return different values?
While this critical thinking may help you (At work, it did help me get the detailed user requirement because the initial requirement was too vague that I had to bombard them with questions until everything is clear). At some point nearing the deadline, you have to make a compromise not to question thing and just do it or it won't make in time.

Coding really does feel more like literature to me than mathematical in any way. It's somewhere in-between, like more structured than writing, but less restrained than math. It's patterned enough to be easily learned, but still flexible enough to be limitless. My brain likes. A lot.
Welcome. How long have you been coding?

But yeah, IDK about coding "better" - I know I also don't abide by some of the "best practices" I do know about, and don't even know what many more of them are, haha. I'm sure my code is a mess and would be sloppy and incomprehensible to anyone else... but if it works, it works! :kaohi: It's just a reflection of the chaos of my mindscape, but it works!
Best practices are crap (example). Start questioning why is it a thing rather than blindly following. Just like you usually do.
 

HexMozart88

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Mental condition aside, instead of labeling them as Neurodivergence, OCD, or Autism (I believe labels will only put you in a cage)
I kind of get what you're saying, but having a diagnosis and using it as a label aren't the same thing. Like, I have anxiety. I just do. That's not me labeling myself. If I make it the sole aspect of my personality, that's labeling, but saying you have a condition is not labeling.
 

TheoAllen

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I kind of get what you're saying, but having a diagnosis and using it as a label aren't the same thing. Like, I have anxiety. I just do. That's not me labeling myself. If I make it the sole aspect of my personality, that's labeling, but saying you have a condition is not labeling.
"I've been diagnosed" is not labeling.
"I can/can't do this because I am..." is labeling.
Just say "I'm not suitable for that/I don't like it"
 

TheAM-Dol

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That perhaps this is why it's been so easy to pick up on for me, like immersing myself in another country and picking up their language.
Ah, way to make me feel terrible about myself :LZSlol: Every time I meet someone new here:
Them: "Can you speak our language?"
Me: "mmm...no, sorry, only a little bit."
Them: "That's okay, it's a tough language, you'll get it eventually. By the way, how long have you lived in our country?"
Me: "..............6 years............"
Them: "Oh........oh..............is that so?..................Our language must be......really.........difficult....................."

:LZSteary:
 

Ratatattat

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you mean *common sense*?
Erm... no, I don't think you understand what I'm talking about haha. We're on like, two totally different brainwaves here :kaoswt2: I mean, you don't have to agree about any specific correlation between neurodivergence and being good at a particular thing, but simply not believing in the concept of predisposition is a different thing entirely? I already explained what it means, and it is a real thing, objectively.
"predisposition" is wrongfully used to "diagnose" things that shouldn't be a problem.
they're only a problem when they would help bring about the solution to the one problem that is the system keeping people from solving the one problem.
that is, that people should ask more "what's the problem" and less "what's the solution to this".
"you're sick! take this pill".... yeah, but *why* is the person sick? what's causing it?
"well, the symptoms are...." yeah, of the thing you already know is there! what is *behind* it?! how did this get to be!?
I don't know if you have some specific experience that you're projecting here, but I completely fail to see how the concept of "predisposition" has literally anything to do with any part of what you've just described. I have never, ever, ever seen the idea of someone having a "predisposition" toward something being used against them in this way? That makes literally no sense...



Either I've just got dyslexia from reading your post or my English isn't good enough. I don't seem to get the point of your first half of the post. But I think I know what you're trying to tell in the second half.
That's fair, I took a long road to get there haha! The first part was trying to give y'all a look into some of the oddly specific ways my brain works on a daily basis, and then comparing how similar it is to how one has to think when coding.
instead of labeling them as Neurodivergence, OCD, or Autism (I believe labels will only put you in a cage)
As someone with Autism, ADHD, and OCD, I prefer to be honest about acknowledging who and what I am, and having "labels" as you call them have personally helped me know where to look for resources and support to understand myself and manage my symptoms :kaohi:So it's a "to each their own" situation - I cannot, and will not, ever tell someone they must identify with or live by labels, but in return I ask others to refrain from telling me I shouldn't, or that it's restrictive in any way... because that has not been my experience.
I would label them as "critical thinking" (or in a label that most people hate, it's "talent")
Related, but still just a side note, there is a lot more to any given "condition" than just generic traits like "critical thinking" or "talent", etc. I would be truly insulted if someone tried to chalk my Autism up to just "awkwardness", or reduce my ADHD to "distractibility", or grossly mislabel my OCD as "perfectionism"... there are about a million different things that make up each, that aren't necessarily a common experience for the average person. This is just a fact. Doesn't make me special, it just means some of my traits must be considered differently than the same (or similar) traits in others. For example, making lists and organizing might help most people keep on top of things. It doesn't help me because I cannot stick to lists or plans without the help of medication. My "distractibility" isn't the same as a non-ADHD person's "distractibility". Not better or worse, just different.
If I would have to nitpick, no, Autistic and OCD don't act as a sole factor for good managers. So, don't think "because I have OCD, I could be a good manager". They need social skills and managing people as well. A lot of factors are in play.
Oh, absolutely! But perhaps having certain traits commonly associated with, for example, OCD might make it easier, or come more naturally? TBH, probably not Autism, as in my experience at least, both myself and my Autistic friends all seem to have a hard time with other key aspects of managing, namely... well, all of the "people" parts, haha.

But, of course, I was talking the least about managing. Mostly the coding/developing parts.
While this critical thinking may help you (At work, it did help me get the detailed user requirement because the initial requirement was too vague that I had to bombard them with questions until everything is clear). At some point nearing the deadline, you have to make a compromise not to question thing and just do it or it won't make in time.
Legit! For sure in a work environment this wouldn't work. I just meant more in general. 99% of the time this is just how I wish I could approach people about disagreements - because of course, 99% of the time, others don't respond well to it.
Welcome. How long have you been coding?
Hard to pinpoint exactly, since I slowly waded into it starting with script calls, progressing to understanding and altering plugins, to now writing my own plugins. But maybe like 6 months-ish since starting the "real" coding?
"I can/can't do this because I am..." is labeling.
Just say "I'm not suitable for that/I don't like it"
But sometimes this is just true. Just like saying "I have ____" is a plain fact, if someone were to say "I cannot walk because I don't have legs", that would also just be a plain fact. "I cannot critique your use of color in your painting because I am blind" would be just a fact.

It's no different with brain-oriented conditions. I cannot do well in grad school without ADHD medication. That's a tried and true fact (unfortunately), not labeling. I cannot concentrate on studying if my brain has checked out for the day. That is a fact I always knew and am reminded every evening I try to study, but was devastatingly confirmed just how bad it is when I spent an entire night, all but chaining myself to my desk, trying to study for an exam the next morning (without sleeping). I started immediately after getting home from class, and only got through studying 2 of the 20+ viruses I needed to study in those 12+ hours. I tried. I tried so hard, but I could not. This is not just "I'm not suitable for it" or "I don't like it", this is "I've tried everything in my power, and every method under the sun to do this thing, and I desperately want/need to be able to do it, but I simply cannot, as my brain will not follow my commands, however eager or desperate".

Yeah, sure, some things are more a case of just not being suited to something. Like, my Autism doesn't prevent me from making new friends, it just makes it harder. But in other cases, like my ADHD described above, a condition may absolutely prevent me from doing things. Just like any physical disability. The brain is an organ and can experience dysfunction, too.



Ah, way to make me feel terrible about myself :LZSlol: Every time I meet someone new here:
Oh no, haha!! Well, I used that as an example, but I definitely don't think I would pick up on an actual language very well :LZSlol: I'm good at picking up on written languages, but the speaking/listening part not so much. But that kinda makes sense because code is written too?? Like, you can visualize code and you can visualize written language. But hearing/speaking it is a different mental process entirely!
 
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gstv87

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@Ratatattat my point being, that it's wrong to correlate what you call "predisposition" with what actually happens.
your "way of thinking" things is simply common sense.
common sense being "the weird way" of doing things when contrasted with the general way of doing things, is what should be analyzed.
if you're good at simplifying things, you'll be good at anything that requires handling complex concepts with ease, not just "programming".
the fact that "programming" is thought of being "only for brainiacs" is because people has grown so accustomed to doing what other people tell them to do, that when they're faced with something that requires simple thinking, they freak out.
 

TheoAllen

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That's fair, I took a long road to get there haha! The first part was trying to give y'all a look into some of the oddly specific ways my brain works on a daily basis
Sure, it is reflected in how you replied to me. Although, I have no commentary on your personal life.
Just like any physical disability. The brain is an organ and can experience dysfunction, too.
This is a fair take. Unfortunately, many people "self-diagnose" themselves and use the labels as an excuse to/not to do something. I believe you are not one of them. I said in the previous line (that you didn't quote). "I've been diagnosed" is a tested medical condition (not self-diagnosed). Because, unlike other physical organs, brain 'dysfunction' is harder to tell.

(Speaking of color-blind, most color-blind people aren't actually aware if they are color-blind).
Hard to pinpoint exactly, since I slowly waded into it starting with script calls, progressing to understanding and altering plugins, to now writing my own plugins. But maybe like 6 months-ish since starting the "real" coding?
This explains your excitement and reminds me of my early days of coding.
I'd say, there are a lot of things to explore. Go forth and discover them.
 

Ratatattat

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your "way of thinking" things is simply common sense.
I think you misunderstood what I described to be "my way of thinking", then. This may be my fault, however - it was a long post and, while it all makes perfect sense to me, I'm known for explaining things in convoluted/indirect ways that don't actually make sense outside of my own head :p

That said, I would argue that quite literally sitting down to do the mental equivalent of "defining a variable" to store for later mental use is probably not something most people do... nor do I consider it really relevant to the concept of "common sense". If anything, I think it's just extremely straightforward and literal thinking. Which, to my knowledge, seems to be a common neurodivergent trait that non-NDs often cannot relate to. That is more along the lines of what I'm talking about.

But again, I was probably super confusing in my post, and also you're still allowed to disagree! I just want to make sure we're starting from the same page so we know exactly what we're disagreeing on :)
the fact that "programming" is thought of being "only for brainiacs"
I definitely don't think that, at least! People around me are like "oh, that sounds hard, I'm so impressed" - and my response is always along the lines of, "actually, once you learn the basics of how it works, it's actually pretty easy, like building sentences once you learn basic grammar and enough vocabulary". Or some variation of that, haha. But yeah, it's definitely stereotyped that way, to be for super smart people only (and obviously I'm not discrediting the super smart people out there who are the absolute best at it).
people has grown so accustomed to doing what other people tell them to do, that when they're faced with something that requires simple thinking, they freak out.
I actually kind of agree with this sentiment, though, for some people :kaoblush:Whenever I learn a new thing, some people around me are always like "wow, that seems so hard!" I take the compliment, but more often than not I have a similar response to above: that it's actually not that hard once you actually sit and apply your brain to it for more than a minute.



Although, I have no commentary on your personal life.
Haha, no worries, I wasn't asking for it :kaohi:
Unfortunately, many people "self-diagnose" themselves and use the labels as an excuse to/not to do something. I believe you are not one of them. I said in the previous line (that you didn't quote). "I've been diagnosed" is a tested medical condition (not self-diagnosed). Because, unlike other physical organs, brain 'dysfunction' is harder to tell.
Oh, for sure! I hadn't even thought of it from this angle. I had interpreted your quote to be more highlighting the difference between "I have x" vs. "I can't do y because of x"; rather than "I am actually diagnosed with x" vs. "I think I have x". But yes, put that way it makes perfect sense.
This explains your excitement and reminds me of my early days of coding.
I'd say, there are a lot of things to explore. Go forth and discover them.
Absolutely :kaoluv: I'm so ready, thanks for the encouragement!
 

Pixel_Maiden

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I think you misunderstood what I described to be "my way of thinking", then. This may be my fault, however - it was a long post and, while it all makes perfect sense to me, I'm known for explaining things in convoluted/indirect ways that don't actually make sense outside of my own head :p

That said, I would argue that quite literally sitting down to do the mental equivalent of "defining a variable" to store for later mental use is probably not something most people do... nor do I consider it really relevant to the concept of "common sense". If anything, I think it's just extremely straightforward and literal thinking. Which, to my knowledge, seems to be a common neurodivergent trait that non-NDs often cannot relate to. That is more along the lines of what I'm talking about.

But again, I was probably super confusing in my post, and also you're still allowed to disagree! I just want to make sure we're starting from the same page so we know exactly what we're disagreeing on :)

I definitely don't think that, at least! People around me are like "oh, that sounds hard, I'm so impressed" - and my response is always along the lines of, "actually, once you learn the basics of how it works, it's actually pretty easy, like building sentences once you learn basic grammar and enough vocabulary". Or some variation of that, haha. But yeah, it's definitely stereotyped that way, to be for super smart people only (and obviously I'm not discrediting the super smart people out there who are the absolute best at it).

I actually kind of agree with this sentiment, though, for some people :kaoblush:Whenever I learn a new thing, some people around me are always like "wow, that seems so hard!" I take the compliment, but more often than not I have a similar response to above: that it's actually not that hard once you actually sit and apply your brain to it for more than a minute.




Haha, no worries, I wasn't asking for it :kaohi:

Oh, for sure! I hadn't even thought of it from this angle. I had interpreted your quote to be more highlighting the difference between "I have x" vs. "I can't do y because of x"; rather than "I am actually diagnosed with x" vs. "I think I have x". But yes, put that way it makes perfect sense.

Absolutely :kaoluv: I'm so ready, thanks for the encouragement!
Its good to know that you are a person with genuine diagnosed neurodivergence. Many people on the internet seems to romanticize the various psychological conditions.

I myself was diagnosed with psychotic depression and it always annoys me to see so many people "self-diagnose" themselves just for clout. It's not a pleasant experience to suffer from it.
 

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There was a tutorial on how to draw anime eyes. Just draw Among Us. So I tried.
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Making a "characters first appearance" drawing for my game. Now I just have to finish the sprite art animation for her grand entrance.​
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