Opinions on the "base" idea

  • Sounds cool

    Votes: 21 95.5%
  • Sounds lame

    Votes: 0 0.0%
  • GRINDY

    Votes: 1 4.5%
  • Other: Put in comments

    Votes: 0 0.0%

  • Total voters
    22

SoulBlade32

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Hi guys!

So I will keep this short. Basically, I have noticed that to the halfway point to end game of most rpgs I have way too much money and nothing to spend it on at that point. Spells far outpace healing items and this is something that I thought I might be able to "remedy" in my game by adding a home base.

The premise is that the party, at a certain point in the game, is a unit in a kingdom's military. They are sent out on missions but they have a base of sorts. I was thinking that some quests will have you saving certain people and they would join your unit as suppliers. They start with a tent and then once you give them a certain amount of materials and money they will upgrade and eventually build into an actual store. There may be 3 different stores for each vendor. Each time, the wares get better and the final vendors will have items that can only be obtained through them. I was thinking of it also being a way to unlock new side quests for those specific NPCs. However, I'm not sure if this is an idea that people would like or if it would just be a grindy thing for players. I would appreciate any feedback!

TLDR: your base is a campsite, through quests, money, and materials it will eventually become a keep.
 

The Stranger

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I like the idea of home bases, especially if they expand and change in various ways over the course of the game; even better if the player has a say in how it changes. I also like it when a home base allows us to talk with our companions, like with the camp in Dragon Age: Origins. Helps give party members a sense of belonging within the world, rather than just being extensions, tools even, of the player's will.
 

h0tWalker

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I personally am always a fan of this, but I know people who dislike it. While some people enjoy RPGs for the traditional parts of it, others for complex mechanics like this, some just enjoy the story and nothing else. I'm mentioning this for two reasons; you gotta know which group your targeting, but most important, you gotta make the game you want to make.

The reason I love rpgs that are well done is because the world is always changing, and you have an effect and see that. I feel the recruitment plays into it. The world is the main character, while the player is the story. Having these recruits tell stories or news from other locations you never visit will even help bring more depth to the game. This has the potential to give the extra spice to your game.

In one of my planed projects I will have a guild hall that can be upgraded, and you pull connections in like you do here. One of my concepts is to release my party members here, so that your character walks alone, allowing you to talk and interact with them. They are people as well, not just a tool following you around. This is the perfect opportunity to add depth, give their takes of the world and even show signs of worry or exhaustion.

That said, it of course comes down to a few factors. Are you making this game for yourself? Is it what you want to make, or do you make it targeting one of the earlier groups I mentioned? Execution plays a large part in this, and if there's side quests to acquire these characters, some might fall off due to playing for story, some completionists might fall off if they miss something, especially a hidden quest. Is this a core mechanic that is required for the player, or can it be skipped entirely. If so, how does that impact the game? These are the questions I would ask that can help shape this into the right system for your project.

As a last note, if this turns into a important mechanic, you can have important characters added through the main story, but all bonus features added from side quests. If you end up having different bedrooms for characters, why not allow some decoration for each of the main characters to be accessed through the game, sorta like Trails from Zero? Even if its just one or two decoration pieces, it felt like I got to know the character better through them just simply adding it to their room (poster, flower vase, a teddy bear, model car, etc.)
 

PixeLockeT

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One of our games in-team does this exact same thing - and it seems to be a hit with the type of player we target (it's a tactical jRPG with some exploration).

Through each chapter the base is able to be upgraded and customized, as well as a return point between some events. My story was elements based so each form of the base would change to reflect the current elemental chapter. Was neato.

Some people will eat it up.
 

Rodak

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Home bases are great story-telling tools when the player becomes dependent upon them only to have The Main Villain destroy them while the players are away, killing half their friends (and maybe a party member who sat out 1 mission?) thus removing their support mechanism and forcing them to rethink everything 2/3rds of the way through the game.
 

SoulBlade32

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I like the idea of home bases, especially if they expand and change in various ways over the course of the game; even better if the player has a say in how it changes. I also like it when a home base allows us to talk with our companions, like with the camp in Dragon Age: Origins. Helps give party members a sense of belonging within the world, rather than just being extensions, tools even, of the player's will.
This is exactly what I was planning. It will start with just the party but after every couple missions/side quests the camp will start to change and more people will join the unit. Every character will have different dialogue after every "main" mission in the game as well.
I personally am always a fan of this, but I know people who dislike it. While some people enjoy RPGs for the traditional parts of it, others for complex mechanics like this, some just enjoy the story and nothing else. I'm mentioning this for two reasons; you gotta know which group your targeting, but most important, you gotta make the game you want to make.

The reason I love rpgs that are well done is because the world is always changing, and you have an effect and see that. I feel the recruitment plays into it. The world is the main character, while the player is the story. Having these recruits tell stories or news from other locations you never visit will even help bring more depth to the game. This has the potential to give the extra spice to your game.

In one of my planed projects I will have a guild hall that can be upgraded, and you pull connections in like you do here. One of my concepts is to release my party members here, so that your character walks alone, allowing you to talk and interact with them. They are people as well, not just a tool following you around. This is the perfect opportunity to add depth, give their takes of the world and even show signs of worry or exhaustion.

That said, it of course comes down to a few factors. Are you making this game for yourself? Is it what you want to make, or do you make it targeting one of the earlier groups I mentioned? Execution plays a large part in this, and if there's side quests to acquire these characters, some might fall off due to playing for story, some completionists might fall off if they miss something, especially a hidden quest. Is this a core mechanic that is required for the player, or can it be skipped entirely. If so, how does that impact the game? These are the questions I would ask that can help shape this into the right system for your project.

As a last note, if this turns into a important mechanic, you can have important characters added through the main story, but all bonus features added from side quests. If you end up having different bedrooms for characters, why not allow some decoration for each of the main characters to be accessed through the game, sorta like Trails from Zero? Even if its just one or two decoration pieces, it felt like I got to know the character better through them just simply adding it to their room (poster, flower vase, a teddy bear, model car, etc.)
This is a bit of a difficult one to answer. First and foremost, I am making it for myself. It's kind of a love letter from me to the older Final Fantasy games that lit my passion for rpgs. However, it's also a story driven rpg that I think traditional jrpg fans will enjoy. But I also want to add enough "new" things that make the game feel different. For example, instead of a Black Mage class, a character will be a "Weathermancer" which is similar to a Geomancer except, well, weather. If it's raining you can use water based spells and there will be some spells that change the weather. For example, a wind spell that when used while raining it cools the air enough to make it snow, thus allowing the use of Ice spells. Essentially a combo system.
One of our games in-team does this exact same thing - and it seems to be a hit with the type of player we target (it's a tactical jRPG with some exploration).

Through each chapter the base is able to be upgraded and customized, as well as a return point between some events. My story was elements based so each form of the base would change to reflect the current elemental chapter. Was neato.

Some people will eat it up.
That sounds like a really cool idea! I don't really have a story element tied to it but I do want to do some cool things with it as the story goes on.
Home bases are great story-telling tools when the player becomes dependent upon them only to have The Main Villain destroy them while the players are away, killing half their friends (and maybe a party member who sat out 1 mission?) thus removing their support mechanism and forcing them to rethink everything 2/3rds of the way through the game.
Well, I do plan on having only 4 static party members as a throw back to older jrpgs, but I haven't ruled out guest characters and deaths. My world is going to be dark and there will be death, I imagine a blend between a world like Final Fantasy 2 and Tactics. Very political but also a large scale war.
 

slimmmeiske2

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I believe this better suited to Game Ideas & Prototypes.

Moving it there

 

Finnuval

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I personaly like these kind of mechanics (and think Suikoden did it best lol) tho its not for everyone. For me the more i can do,see,interact,etc the better tho :)
 

Beewo

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I enjoy home bases, usually when you're out adventuring you can't talk to most of your squadmates/ppl you met. With a homebase you got some time to relax, gather all the npcs/members thoughts and opinions on the current state of affairs and generally regroup. Also a good place to teleport after you finished a chapter.

So ye really enjoy them, especially ifthe place is customizable^^ Enjoy putting as much gold in as i possibly can.
 

Elissiaro

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I love homebases. As long as you can talk to your party members.
Cause well... Long indepth conversations and battlefields don't really go that well together.
And I love long indepth conversations lol.
 

Wavelength

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I like "home bases" or "hub towns" that you deeply interact with (and often build up) throughout the game. I like how you'll see the same characters again and again, and the limited breadth means that you can work on building a smaller number of deeper dynamics that grow alongside you rather than a thousand buildings across thirty towns with NPCs saying "Welcome to Townsville!".

While I can't think of any reasons at all having this home base that you continually upgrade (and the NPCs that you can rescue and help build up their stores), there are a couple things you should just be mindful of as you design your game:
  • Is this home base slowing the pacing of the game? (If you have a fast-paced, thrilling narrative, slowing down to do sidequests and build up stores could hurt the experience)
  • Is the effort you spend creating this home base (and all of the different content in it) worth it, or would that time and effort be better spent on something else in your game?
  • Are you creating this for the right reason in the first place? (The "gobs of money" problem and the "healing outpaces consumables" problem both have simpler, more elegant solutions, so if you're going to create this huge develop-a-base mechanic, make sure it's adding something great to your game on its own merits!)
 

CleanWater

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It kinda reminds me of the first Digimon World game (from PSOne) and I loved that game. Keep it on! :wink:
 

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