Regional English Phase, Slang, and Meaning

Frostorm

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@staf00 Where I am from in western-canada we also call it bubble-tea (but I've seen both in NY)! Although just knowing what bubble-tea is is a feat of its own tbh as it's not super common.

Taiwan created "Bubble tea" which the Chinese word for the tapioca pearls is bōbà (as a side-note, the "bubbles" originally actually referred to the literal air bubbles created when shaking the tea, but later came to mean the tapioca pearls). In Tawain for english they refer to it as "Bubble Tea" and in chinese "bōbà nǎichá". Technically they are saying the exact same thing just one is half-translated and one is completely translated! Also an interesting fact, in chinese boba is slang for a woman's chest sooooo-
I am very familiar w/ Boba. Our mom & pop shop was one of the 1st to introduce it to SoCal in the late 70s lol. I'll never buy it nowadays tho, it's gotten so overpriced...like ~$5/cup. We sold it for $1/cup back in the day, that's why I just make it at home if I'm craving it. XD

Double-double is something you order from a coffee joint (usually the canadian version of dunkin' doughnuts: tim-hortons). It means two sugars two creams. A triple-triple is three creams and three sugars. A single-double would be as you can surmise from the prior applications. xD You could just as easily say "two creams two sugar" and they would understand.
I'm so used to "double-double" referring to In'n'Out's Double-Double burgers lol. /drool
In'n'Out is another west coast thing. You won't find it past Nevada I believe.
 

Riazey

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@staf00 In'n'Out burger doesn't exist in Canada~ I have visited one in New York but it was a knock-off lmao!
 

Frostorm

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@Riazey I guess it's mostly a California thing then, but I know there's 1 in Las Vegas as well.

Another unique thing to California (as far as I know) is that we add "the" in front of all our freeways. Like we'll say "the 210" whereas most other states would say "210 freeway". That's one reason I always turn GPS voice off, cuz it'll say "turn right onto i210 eastbound in 1/2 mile" and that just bugs me. Cuz I would rather hear "turn right onto the 210 east".
 
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Riazey

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Where I'm from we use both "the" and without! You could say "highway 2" or "the 2A" or a combo of those. I don't think I pay too much attention to it tbh because it's easy to understand either way for me~


BUT an interesting regional difference is how you speak of distance itself! Depending on where you live it's acceptable to say distance as time rather than the physical distance such as "Edmonton is 2 hours from me" rather than "Edmonton is 150 km from me".
 

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It's worth noting; British English typically refers to the English Accent & Dialect within a particular region of England - namely London and it's close surrounding suburbs. The "Sherlock Holmes" accent.

British English deviates massively depending on which region of Britain you are in. For example; my Glaswegian Dialect would vary drastically compared with another who grew up in Norfolk.

Same goes for the Irish (both Northern & Republic) in that while they do in fact speak English, they do so somewhat differently including creation of their own words, phrases and slangs that those in good ol' London would struggle to understand.
 

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I've lived in multiple parts of the US, and I'd like to say that "American English" is not a single dialect. Especially when you consider the differences between north and south. There's also a different accent for certain cities, such as NYC. Given the sheer size of the US, this should not be too surprising.

A well known example would be the heavy usage of the slang "yall" in the south.
 

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@Riazey, thank you for your time and take time to explain to me. Thank you.
 

Frostorm

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Yea, the way
Where I'm from we use both "the" and without! You could say "highway 2" or "the 2A" or a combo of those. I don't think I pay too much attention to it tbh because it's easy to understand either way for me~


BUT an interesting regional difference is how you speak of distance itself! Depending on where you live it's acceptable to say distance as time rather than the physical distance such as "Edmonton is 2 hours from me" rather than "Edmonton is 150 km from me".
Yea the distance thing is definitely a thing. Here in SoCal, we almost exclusively measure distance by driving time.
 

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One thing you might may find interesting here though, is the sheer difference even from state to state in the USA of the term for a carbonated drink. Most commonly in Canada it is referred to as "Pop" but a lot of places/states also say "Soda" which also makes sense. However a lot of southern/etc US states say "Coke" (a brand of carbonated drink) for any carbonated drink. You should look up a map for this it's hilarious.
I've always been confused by this because I've lived my entire life in Georgia and almost never heard anyone use the word Coke to mean a generic term for soda.

Everyone I know says soda.

I strangely don't have much of an accent despite living in the South my entire life, I mostly speak "TV English", but there are some word choices that can make it obvious where I'm from.

That said: Y'all is a wonderful word that everyone should use. The plural you is just so useful.
 

HumanNinjaToo

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So I did a google search to see if there were any slang terms for Oklahoma because, you know, the way one speaks is normal to oneself, or so I would imagine.

I didn't see anything on the list that seems out of the ordinary except for a few local terms we use to describe local things, for instance: Tulsa is "T town" and everyone calls Oklahoma City "the city."

The only things I think are weird are calling a marijuana cigarette a lefty, work boots are ****-kickers, and guys who dress up like cowboys just to go out to the bar are glitter bugs.
 

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More Regional words to get headache:
Bet, Mom’n’em, Hella , Whoopensocker ,Burk ,Gabagool ,Doodinkus ,Jawn , and Jumble sale.

Newfoundland and Eastern Canada

b'y, scivey

Central Canada and the Prairies
Bunny Hug, jam buster, Canuck ,The Hat , Takitish

British Columbia and Western Canada
Elephant Ear
Whale's Tail

head'r, beauty , ketchup potato chips , Mountie , mickey , snowbirds
 
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RachelTheSeeker

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As someone who appreciates the sharing of cultures, this thread is fantastic.

For all my WNY pride, lemme introduce y'all to some Buffalo English. Had to look all these up, as I'm used to most all of it. :p Gonna share the phrases and terms I'm most used to.

  • Hey @Riazey, I know the "double-double" thing. I'm surprised that Tim Hortons isn't the favorite NY chain restaurant, those joints are everywhere here. I'm more used to triple-triples, as my family likes their bean juice.
  • "The Aud" referred to the Buffalo War Memorial Auditorium, where our sports teams used to play. Was closed in '96 and demolished in '06. Used to exist in downtown Buffalo.
  • "Buff State" is the SUNY College in Buffalo, not to be confused with the University at Buffalo ("UB" for short).
  • "Bombers" aren't common slang these days, but refer to submarine sandwiches. I can attest because a local sub shop, John & Mary's, had old signs referring to their A-Bomb sausage-and-hot-sauce sub. For the average Buffalonian, I'd imagine that such a spicy sub would be like a nuke on your tongue!
  • For my post-apoc setting, especially when my MC goes from the Lockport area to New Buffalo, I'm *so* calling my hometown "Cheektavegas" (formally Cheektowaga) due to its nickname.
  • In a "crick" (or creek), you'd likely catch "crayfish" (or crawfish) with a cheap plastic cup.
  • Have often heard to "sit yer dupa down", with dupa meaning butt. Blame the Polish folks in Cheektowaga.
  • I miss the "lawn fetes" they used to have at the old Catholic church's big parking lot. A Catholic-only experience, it was an open fair often held near the end of summer. Blame the Italian folks in Cheektowaga.
  • "Loganberry" should be as hailed as Buffalo wings, if it's not, as a WNY treat. It's a non-carbonated soft drink that was once sold at the now-defunct Crystal Beach amusement park, and survived as a Buffalo tradition beyond the closing in '89. I guess it's named and flavored after a hybrid fruit, mixed between raspberry and blackberry; it was spliced by Judge J.H. Logan in California, sometime in the late 1800s.
  • For how we name places, we often use "the X" for expressways. We also call businesses "Blockbuster's", "La Nova's" or "Aldi's", as if the store name was always named after whoever owned it. For instance, y'might go "on the Kensington (NY 33) to that Bon-Ton's at the (Walden) Galleria (mall)".
  • Every damned Greek-American restaurant here claims they're the "Original Home of the Souvlaki".
  • I don't care where you're from; here in WNY, "wings" are deep-fried, non-breaded chicken wings with a buttery hot sauce coating. I won't knock Southern wings till I try 'em, but that extra step seems weird from afar...
EDIT: As for what to call a carbonated, highly-sugary beverage here? It's normally called "pop", though I sometimes call it "soda pop" to compromise drink-slang purists.
 
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Kupotepo

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@RachelTheSeeker, thank you for sharing the slangs and their meaning with me.
Oklahoma Phases:
Howdy - Just a friendly Oklahoma hello.
Cowpie - cow dung
Packin
Fraidy Hole
Ice Box
Tarnation
Piddling
Fixin to

Georgia Phases:
Dawgs -
Coke - Anything that’s carbonated and filled with sugar.
Buggy - A shopping cart.
Quit Being Ugly! -
Thank You Kindly - I think it just Southern States phases.
Juug -
Fye - When something is extremely cool, well done or visually pleasing.
Yeene-enno - A shorter, quicker way of saying "you didn't even know."
Natnat -
12
No cap
Patna nem - A shorter, quicker way of saying "partner and them," which is a group of friends and/or acquaintances.

Ohio words and phases:
The boot - the trunk of a car
Pop - soda

New York Slangs:
Take it there:
Grill: to stare:
Rachet:
Spaz: to get violent or confrontational
Thirstbucket: to act overly desperate
Guap:
Dead-ass: to act very seriously
Thirsty :
Gully: to be overly authentic or genuine to the streets
What's good, madude :
 
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