SaintInix's Tech Support

Discussion in 'Tech Support-All Makers' started by SaintInix, Jul 11, 2015.

  1. SaintInix

    SaintInix The Saint Veteran

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    Hey folks,


    So I've been thinking, and I know I'm really new to the RM engine, so I can't really do Scripting, and Tilesets and stuff yet...


    What I CAN do, is provide Tech Support, namely Hardware/Software troubleshooting and Networking. (As a free service, not against nifty gifts and Thank You's, but I'm not expecting to be paid. Just wanna help out.)


    I've been into IT since I was young, and I've got 15 years of experience. I've worked for Microsoft as a DSL Technician, I've run my own Webhosts, Private game servers, Websites, File Hosting, etc.


    For several years I supported myself and paid my bills by running a PC Repair business from my house. I've worked in Industrial IT, as a CNC Operator, and I'm the 'Computer Dude' everyone brings stuff to, to fix, refurbish, recycle, and so on.


    So, any general questions related to Windows Operation, Software Compatibility, Networking (Home and Business), Hardware Compatibility, etc. (Not too great with Mac, and I dabble in Linux/Unix based systems. Not as much call for them, and most Linux/Unix users know how to get stuff done.)


    I'll even help people build new PCs, pick out parts based on the needs and budget, and send a list of links for what to purchase.


    If you are having Network issues (Connecting to WiFi, maintaining a connection, etc.) Check out this spoiler!

    Here are some great tips contributed by other Forum Members
    Andar

    Macatlas

    If other devices are experiencing the issue...

    Your laptop is fine, so we can rely on it for further troubleshooting.
    Bypass the router.


    If you have DSL, Cable, or Satellite, hook your laptop up to your modem with an Ethernet cable and use the internet like normal. If you have wireless, hook your laptop to the PoE/Radio (tiny black box that says either PoE or radio on it). Fiber? Hook your laptop right to the cable coming out of the wall.


    No drops? Your router is the problem.


    If the connection still craps out when your laptop is hardwired directly to the modem/radio/wall, you'll need to contact your ISP and tell them to fix their bad mojo.
    If only the laptop is experiencing the issue...

    Don't worry, because you have a lot of options! If only your laptop is experiencing the issue, it means 1 of 4 things:
    1. Your laptop grabbed a bad setting somewhere and your networking software is corrupted.


    2. Your NIC (Network Interface Card) has literally burned out. Kicked the bucket. Pushing up the daisies. Or it's getting ready to, anyways. You'll need to order a replacement and install it yourself, or take it to a shop. This is worst-case scenario.


    3. A program in the background is randomly throttling your connection. You mentioned bloatware, so this is definitely possible. Any backup programs, cleaning utilities, or 'totally rad 3rd-party system tool you CAN'T live without' needs to be removed via Programs and Features. If you post a list of suspicious programs for me, I can tell you which programs I would remove for one of my customers.


    4. You have a virus. Run AVG, Malwarebytes, or any other anti-viruses you may have. In my experience, Hitman or Hitman Pro is the only tool that has detected and removed every virus I throw at it. I highly recommend it.


    So, I'd take care of the bloatware and virus scans first. We're essentially gonna go through a long process of elimination at this point, which if followed to the T, will hit, like, a thousands birds with one stone.


    If the bloatware and viruses check out, it's time to move on to potentially corrupted networking software. You mentioned you found articles on this exact issue, and judging from your explanation of those articles, it sounds like a lot of people have corrupted software. Editing the registry should be uneccessary; I'm sure your laptop isn't the only laptop with that NIC, and all NICs use similar software to communicate with the Windows 8 OS. Instead of editing tedious settings in the registry, we can tackle the root of all NIC problems head-on. Of course, by 'tackle' I really mean 'fix', and by 'root of all NIC problems' I mean 'drivers.' So in other words, we're going to fix your drivers.
    .


    Fixing corrupted NIC software/tackling the root of all NIC problems head-on/fixing your drivers.

    Let me start off by saying this. When any of my customers hear me say the word 'drivers' they immediately become defensive, almost like I'm saying 'you b***ch' in a room full of women. The first thing that all scammers, phishers, or virus programs point out is that your computer needs to repair, update, or install missing drivers, and only they can repair your beloved computer. Most people have become aware of this. But the reason this method works so well is because it's rooted in truth. Every piece of hardware in your computer needs to have a driver (software for a piece of hardware) to run correctly. While most people are deathly afraid of drivers due to that key phrase being mentioned by the numerous schemes out there, what most people don't realize is that a comprehensive list of drivers exists on every computer. We don't need extra software, and we don't need to let some guy with a thick accent remote into our computer. When it comes to fixing drivers, it's easier than taking candy away from a... well, let's say a bear. I want to be as accurate as possible here. so fixing drivers is definitely easer than taking candy away from a bear.
    To repair a NIC software/driver issue, we need to completely uninstall the driver. Then, we reinstall it. Crazy, right? It's like throwing a broken chair out of a window, then bringing it back inside hoping it magically fixed itself somewhere along the way. Except, with computer software, this actually works. Before we do anything else, let's create a restore point just in case.
    Creating a Restore Point

    Just in case things go south, we need to make a restore point. It's rare, but if the physical NIC is fried or there's a deeper issue on the computer, the driver simply won't reinstall correctly. So, let's make that restore point before we make any changes!
    To do this in Windows 8, go to your desktop, open the Power User Tasks menu using the Win+X key combination.


    Go to System > System Protection (left side of the menu) > 'Yes' to UAC if prompted > click the 'Create' button.


    Type in a description to help you identify the restore point later on.


    Click 'Create' again, then 'Close' when the process is finished.
    Ripping/Reinstalling the NIC

    Now, we need to uninstall and reinstall your NIC. This is called a rip/reinstall.
    We need to open the Device Manager; there's an option for it in the Power User Tasks menu (Win+X when looking at the desktop).


    Expand the 'Network Adapters' category.


    Try to locate your wireless adapter in the Network Adapters. Keywords to look for are 'wireless' or 'WiFi.'


    Right-click on your wireless adapter, then click 'uninstall.'


    MOST IMPORTANT STEP: When you click uninstall, a box may come up asking if you want to 'delete the software from the computer or harddrive.' DO NOT check this option. The computer WILL NOT be able to reinstall your NIC if you check this option. That being said, we did create a restore point, so keep your shirt on if you accidentally check this. It's reversible.


    Once the uninstall is complete, immediately reboot your PC.


    Your computer should automatically reinstall the drivers/software for your wireless NIC. Allow up to five minutes for this process to complete.


    If everything reinstalled correctly, your WiFi icon will appear in the System Tray like normal, and you can click it to pull up the WiFi Connections Menu.


    You'll need to reconnect to your WiFi with your security key.


    Wa-la! You've completed the troubleshooting. If this issue is caused by a virus, bloatware, or corrupted software/drivers, you will have fixed each of these potential problems. If you're still having the issue, that means your NIC itself has gone bad and needs to be replaced or repaired. At that point, I would check into your warranty options, or take the laptop to a shop.
    If things go south...

    If the NIC doesn't reinstall, or you encounter any other critical issues, go ahead and restore the PC using our restore point (or an earlier auto-created restore point if necessary). To do this,

    • Swipe in from the right edge of the screen, and then tap Search.


      (If you're using a mouse, point to the upper-right corner of the screen, move the mouse pointer down, and then click Search.)

    • Enter Control Panel in the search box, and tap or click Control Panel.

    • Enter Recovery in the Control Panel search box, and then tap or click Recovery.

    • Tap or click Open System Restore, and then follow the instructions.
    I hope this helps! Feel free to ask if you have questions or further problems. SaintInix seems to know what he's doing, so he may be able to provide another perspective on your issue. The previous troubleshooting I outlined can apply to many different internet problems spanning any version of Windows, so it's more comprehensive than specific. I haven't dealt with your laptop specifically, so there may be more a complicated issue going on there if my suggestions don't fix the problem.
    Best of luck!


    Format for Help Requests


    1. Make and Model of your Computer (Dell Inspiron XXXX, Acer Aspire XXX, etc. If it's a custom build, I'll need to know the hardware you are using in it. I can help you figure this out, just PM me.)


    2. Issue that is disrupting normal operation (Freezes, Blue Screens, Dropped WiFi connection, etc. Any error messages or codes, I need those. Please be exact when reporting error codes. Even one zero that looks like an O can make it very time consuming to track down the issue and the solution.)


    3. Preferred method of Contact. (E-mail, PM, Skype, what-have-you. I don't wanna have to spend hours tracking someone down after I've figured out a solution.)


    4. Notes, other issues, or any other information you can give. (When the issue started, if there's anything that you remember changing or installing/uninstalling around the same time. Pretty much every word of info you give me will help me sort the issue out and get to the bottom of it faster, and find a working solution.)


    I can do phone support, Skype, Google+ as well, which would allow me to see the screen, identify errors, things like that.


    Please, do not post a one line reply with... 'mai puter broked, halp!'


    I can't do anything if you don't give me the information I need. So please be detailed, and be aware that I have other obligations. I will try to help people as quickly as possible, but real life has to come first folks.


    Disclaimer: I've never liked coding. I learned HTML when I was 15, and that's pretty much it. Stuff that has to do with Scripting for RPG Maker... Not my cup 'o tea, so to speak. Not that I'm not going to learn, but for right now, I'm just offering my general PC Tech skills. As of right now, I'm too new to the engine to start giving advice and support on it, but I'll get there.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jul 20, 2015
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  2. Yuuta Kirishima

    Yuuta Kirishima Software Engineer/Professional Mayonnaise Player Veteran

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    mai puter broked, halp!

    Now but this is an excellent thread I'll definitely be visiting this as I am a software engineer not a hardware engineer so the actual technical aspect of the computer i'm not rich on. I built my first computer when I was 13, and lord was it horrible, I just gave up on computer engineering after that fiasco.Thank you for creating this thread, now for my first question...

    I have a secondary PC that's just sitting in my living room collecting dust as I never use it, it's a  intel 2.66Ghz dual core. I plan on wiping entirely (OS and all)  my internal hard drive (It's completely filled will virus and malware) and replacing it with an external hard drive I've got my eyes on this beauty here http://goo.gl/RHj1fx. Here's where you come in, I plan on using this PC to host several servers for websites, games, etc. Will my computer be up for it? Or will I have to use a more current, more powerful computer, or what do you recommend?
     
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  3. SaintInix

    SaintInix The Saint Veteran

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    Haha, nice. 'I dnt no bra, gt a bigr hamr!'

    By the way, that RAID drive is a freakin' beast. You must be hosting Audio and Tilesets or something, that's a huge amount of space. Also, you're gonna wanna go with eSATA or USB 3.0 for that, which I'm sure your older computer doesn't have USB 3.0.

    Ok, so this is actually a great question, as I currently am using a Dell with a Core2Duo at 3Ghz to host a Private WoW Classic Server (Patch 1.21 or something) as well as a Project Zomboid server on the same PC at the same time.

    So to break it down in some terms others might understand as well.

    I've run Private World of Warcraft (Granted, like Burning Crusade era, before Cataclysm.) servers on OLD AMD AthlonXP dual CPU servers. We're talking two 1.4GHz Single core chips, running DDR1 RAM and IDE Hard Drives, and flawlessly hosting two Game Shards (Fun Server and Blizz-like). Game servers are pretty easy, since you only host the processes that serve up data to your players. You don't have to be running the game engine with all the pretty graphics and lights, a Mangos WoW server is a MySQL Server, a Realm and a World Server. It's just three little command windows with text going by so fast it will make you pass out.

    Any Dual core over 2.0Ghz is gonna handle most game servers and file/web hosting without breaking a sweat, IF that's all it's doing.

    So just for clarification, are you using a Pentium D (Dual Core) or the Core2Duo, or a Core i3? (All of these are Intel Pentium Dual core CPUs, but there is a fairly large performance gap between them because of Hyperthreading, CPU Cache and pipeline sizes, as well as the performance of your cooling unit, the quality of your Thermal paste, the size (In nanometers) of the manufacturing processes, etc.

    Intel chips, especially older ones, tend to run pretty hot. You need to make sure it's well ventilated and operating at a safe temp to prevent CPU Throttling, overheating, and eventually damage to the processor (CPU) or other components.

    Depending on how many game servers (Shards) you plan to host, and how many visitors you plan to get to your file and web hosting services, would tell me if what you've got will be enough.

    If you plan to host files for friends and other people from the forums, have a few personal sites with a reasonable amount of pages and not too much traffic, then yeah. You're current setup should work fine, though I would max the RAM in the server PC if you can, it will only help. A Pentium D can do this.

    If you have a Core2Duo, you can squeeze some more in there. With a Core i3, even more.

    It's really not about what is running on the PC, which will be your private game servers, your SQL, an Apache server, with your Dyndns all hooked up. It's about the number of people that access your site at one time.

    You can have 100,000 people come through a server in a day, but if it's never more than a dozen at once, you won't see any lag. If half of them get on the site, or try to play a game, or download/upload on their lunch break....

    You'll be looking at a smoking pile of circuit boards.
     
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  4. Yuuta Kirishima

    Yuuta Kirishima Software Engineer/Professional Mayonnaise Player Veteran

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    Alrighty! I'm not sure the exact specs I have on the computer so you're saying I would have enough space for a small server but not for a larger scale server? I'm currently using this http://strongdoggames.6te.net/ to host a server for a RPG maker game and it's slower than my blonde ex-girlfriend, i mean if more than 4 people are logged on at once and retrieving data from the SQL database it lags like hell. I'm actually hoping(praying) for at least 100+ members playing a day, so what specs do you recommend? I am willing to buy a completely new computer to support these servers.
     
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  5. SaintInix

    SaintInix The Saint Veteran

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    Okay, that helps a bit. Having 100+ players logged in at the same time, yeah.  You'd need an upgrade.

    One other thing I didn't really get into about it, because I wasn't sure of your player count, is Bandwidth.

    If you're going to be hosting 100+ players at once, you're going to need a wicked UPLOAD speed. Download speed, not so much, because they are usually ten times greater than your upload speed for most ISPs. You're going to need a pretty hefty upload speed to allow for 100 players to play without game-breaking lag.

    My servers were all pretty small scale, just friends and family. I never had more than maybe 20 folks on my WoW server at once. Even at those numbers, I could see a difference in loading times for webpages, download speeds, etc. (That was on a Comcast 50Mb connection too. Although they have improved upload speed in the last couple years.)

    I would have to recommend an actual server for this, something like a Dell or HP, or a custom build even. You're gonna need some ECC RAM, a Gigabit Ethernet port (Physically hookup this thing to your router, do NOT use a WiFi adapter.) and probably more processing power than a Dual core can put out.

    There are great deals these days on Ebay, and Cragislist for used servers that have been removed from business systems. Hell, I've got a Dell Poweredge 2850 Rackmount 2U server sitting on my desk collecting dust. 8GB DDR ECC Registered RAM, PCI Graphics card, 8x72GB 15,000RPM SCSI drives. I got it for $100.

    It came with two single core Xeon CPUs, and it accepts up to like 3.0GHz Xeon Dual cores. Which are like $6 a pair on Ebay. (Four cores total on two CPU slots)

    ~Edit~ Just trying to figure out the core numbers here, but not knowing how much your game transfers per second makes it more like a Ballpark.

    I'd have to say you're going to need at least a Quad core, but maybe a 6-core. If you plan to build or buy a new machine, I'd go for a 6-core, but look for the highest Clock speed possible, because some programs still aren't coded to use multiple cores and therefore only operate on one, which can bone you even with a 10-core AMD CPU.

    Also, you're probably going to need around a 100Mb/s connection speed with like at least 1TB of Bandwidth per month. Maybe 2TB. So you'll also need a Static IP, which pretty much requires you upgrade to business class cable. DSL will not handle this, period.
     
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  6. Yuuta Kirishima

    Yuuta Kirishima Software Engineer/Professional Mayonnaise Player Veteran

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    You are a prince among men! This is great info, when I start making my MMORPG I will return.
     
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  7. SaintInix

    SaintInix The Saint Veteran

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    No problems, this is my way of giving back to you guys.

    Everyone welcomed me like I was just always here, helpful, insightful, generous.

    Just the resources people have put up here for free is simply stunning.

    Only trying to give a little back of what I've received so far from everyone.

    Come back anytime my friend, glad I could help.
     
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  8. Yuuta Kirishima

    Yuuta Kirishima Software Engineer/Professional Mayonnaise Player Veteran

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    Back for another question,

    Do you know if there is a free effective way to prevent & trace DDoS attacks? On one of my game server's a troll got angry because he was "out-trolled" and attacked my internet, I rather not get my ISP involved unless it's absolutely necessary, how about it?
     
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  9. SaintInix

    SaintInix The Saint Veteran

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    Well, this is tough.


    Because of the nature of most DDos attacks, the 'attacking' computer may not even be the person that's actively doing the attacking.


    A great number of people use vulnerable PCs as a means of action, leaving you searching for innocent folks that have no idea the attack is being routed through their computer.


    There's also the problem of 'darknet' IP addresses. Held in reserve, they are not assigned to any customer yet, and are often hijacked to make it even harder to trace the origin of the attack.


    Mostly, for small operators, it's about closing down as many open ports as possible, and keeping back-ups for damage control.


    There's no easy way to protect yourself, and it's even harder to trace without the help of ISPs and multiple people working as a team.


    Not to say that it's impossible, it's just pretty difficult for anyone at the entry level of Server Administration.
     
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  10. Yuuta Kirishima

    Yuuta Kirishima Software Engineer/Professional Mayonnaise Player Veteran

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    Aw man, so it's best that I contact my ISP?
     
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  11. SaintInix

    SaintInix The Saint Veteran

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    There are services that are able to repel and mitigate the damage of a DDos.


    However, I wasn't sure if you wanted to pay anything for them.


    It might be worth a look if you plan to get some donations maybe?


    I've heard good things about Prolexic


    Can't really say anything as to how well it works, never used it myself. It will cost you though.


    In general though, if you're hosting, and your ISP knows that, they are going to nail you with fees.


    However, if and when they do, that's when you demand better support and hopefully get in contact with their actual system admins.


    ~Edit~ In the case you had another old PC laying about, even a laptop, you could use that as a gateway.


    It wouldn't stop DDos attacks, but it would put your main server behind an authentication point.


    Running a Login server on one machine with everything routed between that and your World Server or actual hosting box.
     
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  12. Seriel

    Seriel Veteran Member

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    I'm just gonna go ahead and recommend SaintInix's tech support.

    I had problems with my internet a while back, and he helped me sort it all out. (The article you linked to had the solution ;)
     
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  13. Sharm

    Sharm Pixel Tile Artist Veteran

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    This is a really cool thing you're doing!  Thank you very much!

    My problem is my wifi connection and I'm positive it's my relatively new Lenovo y50-70 and nothing else that's causing the problem.  Randomly it'll just drop from a normal speed to only about 2mbps.  It's not related to interference from other electronics either, I've checked.  It's also not time of day, this will happen at any time throughout the day, sometimes multiple times, sometimes not at all.  I tried looking up the problem and found that some Lenovo's have problems with some sort of setting that keeps searching for wifi even while it's being connected but when trying to follow the steps to fix it I couldn't find the registry entry that needed to be changed.  Not even sure if that's the problem.  I don't think I've gotten rid of all the bloatware yet, but I'm never sure what's okay to uninstall or not.  Anyway, do you think you could help me figure it out and fix it?
     
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  14. BeardBro

    BeardBro I think this line's mostly filler. Veteran

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    I'm in IT, so this is right up my alley. I don't know what kind of connection you have (DSL, Cable, Satellite, Fiber, etc), so I'm going to pretend you have DSL or cable which includes a modem, a router, or a modem/router combo. It does sound like an issue with your Network Interface Card, or NIC. Here's a troubleshooting path I would follow to determine the problem and potentially fix it along the way (feel free to skip steps you've already performed):

    First Steps

    Powercycle equipment. Seems basic, but a lot of people forget to do this. Unplug the power from that modem and router for a full 2 minutes and plug'er back in.
    Check other devices. Does this only happen on your laptop? Do you have a smartphone or tablet you can test the connection on? If you have a smartphone or tablet, download an app like Ping & DNS and start a ping to www.google.com.

    Let the pings run until your laptop speeds drop, then quickly check the app and see how the pings were affected.

    If your pings are suddenly taking 1000+ms to go through, there's definitely a problem with the connection, not just your laptop.
    If other devices are experiencing the issue...

    Your laptop is fine, so we can rely on it for further troubleshooting.Bypass the router.

    If you have DSL, Cable, or Satellite, hook your laptop up to your modem with an Ethernet cable and use the internet like normal. If you have wireless, hook your laptop to the PoE/Radio (tiny black box that says either PoE or radio on it). Fiber? Hook your laptop right to the cable coming out of the wall.

    No drops? Your router is the problem.

    If the connection still craps out when your laptop is hardwired directly to the modem/radio/wall, you'll need to contact your ISP and tell them to fix their bad mojo.
    If only the laptop is experiencing the issue...

    Don't worry, because you have a lot of options! If only your laptop is experiencing the issue, it means 1 of 4 things:
    1. Your laptop grabbed a bad setting somewhere and your networking software is corrupted.

    2. Your NIC (Network Interface Card) has literally burned out. Kicked the bucket. Pushing up the daisies. Or it's getting ready to, anyways. You'll need to order a replacement and install it yourself, or take it to a shop. This is worst-case scenario.

    3. A program in the background is randomly throttling your connection. You mentioned bloatware, so this is definitely possible. Any backup programs, cleaning utilities, or 'totally rad 3rd-party system tool you CAN'T live without' needs to be removed via Programs and Features. If you post a list of suspicious programs for me, I can tell you which programs I would remove for one of my customers.

    4. You have a virus. Run AVG, Malwarebytes, or any other anti-viruses you may have. In my experience, Hitman or Hitman Pro is the only tool that has detected and removed every virus I throw at it. I highly recommend it.

    So, I'd take care of the bloatware and virus scans first. We're essentially gonna go through a long process of elimination at this point, which if followed to the T, will hit, like, a thousands birds with one stone.

    If the bloatware and viruses check out, it's time to move on to potentially corrupted networking software. You mentioned you found articles on this exact issue, and judging from your explanation of those articles, it sounds like a lot of people have corrupted software. Editing the registry should be uneccessary; I'm sure your laptop isn't the only laptop with that NIC, and all NICs use similar software to communicate with the Windows 8 OS. Instead of editing tedious settings in the registry, we can tackle the root of all NIC problems head-on. Of course, by 'tackle' I really mean 'fix', and by 'root of all NIC problems' I mean 'drivers.' So in other words, we're going to fix your drivers.
    .

    Fixing corrupted NIC software/tackling the root of all NIC problems head-on/fixing your drivers.

    Let me start off by saying this. When any of my customers hear me say the word 'drivers' they immediately become defensive, almost like I'm saying 'you b***ch' in a room full of women. The first thing that all scammers, phishers, or virus programs point out is that your computer needs to repair, update, or install missing drivers, and only they can repair your beloved computer. Most people have become aware of this. But the reason this method works so well is because it's rooted in truth. Every piece of hardware in your computer needs to have a driver (software for a piece of hardware) to run correctly. While most people are deathly afraid of drivers due to that key phrase being mentioned by the numerous schemes out there, what most people don't realize is that a comprehensive list of drivers exists on every computer. We don't need extra software, and we don't need to let some guy with a thick accent remote into our computer. When it comes to fixing drivers, it's easier than taking candy away from a... well, let's say a bear. I want to be as accurate as possible here. so fixing drivers is definitely easer than taking candy away from a bear.
    To repair a NIC software/driver issue, we need to completely uninstall the driver. Then, we reinstall it. Crazy, right? It's like throwing a broken chair out of a window, then bringing it back inside hoping it magically fixed itself somewhere along the way. Except, with computer software, this actually works. Before we do anything else, let's create a restore point just in case.
    Creating a Restore Point

    Just in case things go south, we need to make a restore point. It's rare, but if the physical NIC is fried or there's a deeper issue on the computer, the driver simply won't reinstall correctly. So, let's make that restore point before we make any changes!To do this in Windows 8, go to your desktop, open the Power User Tasks menu using the Win+X key combination.

    Go to System > System Protection (left side of the menu) > 'Yes' to UAC if prompted > click the 'Create' button.

    Type in a description to help you identify the restore point later on.

    Click 'Create' again, then 'Close' when the process is finished.
    Ripping/Reinstalling the NIC

    Now, we need to uninstall and reinstall your NIC. This is called a rip/reinstall.We need to open the Device Manager; there's an option for it in the Power User Tasks menu (Win+X when looking at the desktop).

    Expand the 'Network Adapters' category.

    Try to locate your wireless adapter in the Network Adapters. Keywords to look for are 'wireless' or 'WiFi.'

    Right-click on your wireless adapter, then click 'uninstall.'

    MOST IMPORTANT STEP: When you click uninstall, a box may come up asking if you want to 'delete the software from the computer or harddrive.' DO NOT check this option. The computer WILL NOT be able to reinstall your NIC if you check this option. That being said, we did create a restore point, so keep your shirt on if you accidentally check this. It's reversible.

    Once the uninstall is complete, immediately reboot your PC.

    Your computer should automatically reinstall the drivers/software for your wireless NIC. Allow up to five minutes for this process to complete.

    If everything reinstalled correctly, your WiFi icon will appear in the System Tray like normal, and you can click it to pull up the WiFi Connections Menu.

    You'll need to reconnect to your WiFi with your security key.

    Wa-la! You've completed the troubleshooting. If this issue is caused by a virus, bloatware, or corrupted software/drivers, you will have fixed each of these potential problems. If you're still having the issue, that means your NIC itself has gone bad and needs to be replaced or repaired. At that point, I would check into your warranty options, or take the laptop to a shop.
    If things go south...

    If the NIC doesn't reinstall, or you encounter any other critical issues, go ahead and restore the PC using our restore point (or an earlier auto-created restore point if necessary). To do this,
    1. Swipe in from the right edge of the screen, and then tap Search.

      (If you're using a mouse, point to the upper-right corner of the screen, move the mouse pointer down, and then click Search.)
    2. Enter Control Panel in the search box, and tap or click Control Panel.
    3. Enter Recovery in the Control Panel search box, and then tap or click Recovery.
    4. Tap or click Open System Restore, and then follow the instructions.
    I hope this helps! Feel free to ask if you have questions or further problems. SaintInix seems to know what he's doing, so he may be able to provide another perspective on your issue. The previous troubleshooting I outlined can apply to many different internet problems spanning any version of Windows, so it's more comprehensive than specific. I haven't dealt with your laptop specifically, so there may be more a complicated issue going on there if my suggestions don't fix the problem.

    Best of luck!
     
    #14
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  15. SaintInix

    SaintInix The Saint Veteran

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    Hey Sharm,

    Thanks for the question, and to Macatlas for the comprehensive guide to network troubleshooting.

    If those basic steps can't fix the problem, then it's certainly something a bit more in-depth.

    I've seen issues with some WiFi cards on certain wireless channels, or particular network bands. (B - 11Mbps, G - 54Mbps and N - 150-300Mbps)

    It's also possible that your Lenovo, and the WiFi card that are in it, don't operate very well on the type of WiFi encryption you use, WEP, WPA, WPA-2, etc.

    Also, you could be on a crowded channel. Without seeing your local WiFi configuration, it's hard to tell.

    The registry fix does seem to be an issue, that Key being set to constantly search for a signal even after finding one.

    We could try a Google+ thing, and I could direct you through audio while you show me your screen.

    That's probably the easiest way to fix your particular issue, shouldn't be more than 10 minutes or so.

    Let me know, just drop me a PM or a reply here, should get an e-mail either way.
     
    #15
  16. Sharm

    Sharm Pixel Tile Artist Veteran

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    That windows-x key combo is useful.  Thanks so much for this!  You were very thorough in your comments.  I tried the driver reinstall.  It'll take a while to be sure if it worked or not, this problem isn't happening often enough for me to be sure unless it goes a few days without problems.

    Here's all the programs that I didn't install myself.

    CCSDK

    CyberLink Power2Go 8

    CyberLink PowerDirector 10

    Dolby Digital Plus Home Theater

    Dragon Assistant 3

    Dragon Assistant 3 Language Data Pack en_Us

    Energy Manager

    Intel Graphics Driver

    Intel Managment Engine Components

    Intel Rapid Storage Technology

    Lenovo Bluetooth with Enhanced Data Rate Software

    Lenovo Dependency Package

    Lenovo Easy Camera

    Lenovo Motion Control

    Lenovo OneKey Recovery

    Lenovo PowerDVD10

    Lenovo Reach

    Lenovo Settings

    Lenovo Updates

    Lenovo VeriFace Pro

    Lenovo Wireless_Driver

    Microsoft Visual C++ (There's 12 of these)

    Microsoft XNA Framework Redistributable 3.1

    NVIDIA GeForce Experience 2.1.5

    NVIDIA Graphics Driver 345.05

    NVIDIA PhysX System Software 9.14.0702

    OneKey Theater

    Realtek Card Reader

    Realtek Ethernet Controller Driver

    Realtek High Definition Audio Driver

    Synaptics Pointing Device Driver

    UESDK

    Unity Web Player

    User Manuals

    Windows Driver Package - Lenovo (ACPIVPC) System (09/24/2013 19.29.2.34)

    Windows Driver Package - Lenovo (WUDFRd) LenovoVhid (07/25/2013 10.30.0.288)
     
    #16
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  17. SaintInix

    SaintInix The Saint Veteran

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    CCSDK (Required, probably for a Game engine you have)

    CyberLink Power2Go 8 (DVD Software I believe, if you don't watch DVDs, probably don't need it)

    CyberLink PowerDirector 10  (DVD Software I believe, could be a 'movie maker' program, if you don't use it, you don't need it)

    Dolby Digital Plus Home Theater (Not required, but probably assists in audio quality)

    Dragon Assistant 3 (Only needed if you use the Talk to Text stuff in Dragon)

    Dragon Assistant 3 Language Data Pack en_Us (Only needed if you use the Talk to Text stuff in Dragon)

    Energy Manager (I would leave this, since it's a laptop, probably helps the battery charge quicker)

    Intel Graphics Driver (Required)

    Intel Managment Engine Components (Required)

    Intel Rapid Storage Technology (Required)

    Lenovo Bluetooth with Enhanced Data Rate Software (Required)

    Lenovo Dependency Package (Required)

    Lenovo Easy Camera (Required)

    Lenovo Motion Control (Required)

    Lenovo OneKey Recovery (Required)

    Lenovo PowerDVD10 (Only needed if you play DVDs on your Laptop)

    Lenovo Reach (? Don't know)

    Lenovo Settings (Not really needed, most stuff can be changed from Windows, unless you don't know how to change most windows settings, you can get rid of it)

    Lenovo Updates (I personally never install updates, but for most folks that aren't boned up on network and application security, it's helpful)

    Lenovo VeriFace Pro (Only needed if you use facial passwords)

    Lenovo Wireless_Driver (Required)

    Microsoft Visual C++ (There's 12 of these) (Required)

    Microsoft XNA Framework Redistributable 3.1 (Required)

    NVIDIA GeForce Experience 2.1.5 (Required)

    NVIDIA Graphics Driver 345.05 (Required)

    NVIDIA PhysX System Software 9.14.0702 (Required)

    OneKey Theater (Only needed if you use the 'One button' video play feature, probably a button up near the top of the keyboard.)

    Realtek Card Reader (Required)

    Realtek Ethernet Controller Driver (Required)

    Realtek High Definition Audio Driver (Required)

    Synaptics Pointing Device Driver (Required)

    UESDK (Unity SDK for the Game Engine I believe, I would keep it)

    Unity Web Player (Also, for using the Unity web player, a LOT more stuff is using this these days, I would keep it)

    User Manuals (Not really needed, unless you often look at them for troubleshooting, all this can be found on the Lenovo website usually)

    Windows Driver Package - Lenovo (ACPIVPC) System (09/24/2013 19.29.2.34) (Required)

    Windows Driver Package - Lenovo (WUDFRd) LenovoVhid (07/25/2013 10.30.0.288) (Required)

     

    Hope that helps a little bit Sharm.

     

    Also, there's some really good programs out there for cleaning out your PC, uninstalling programs and such.

     

    I use one called 'Auslogics Boostspeed' it's a great program, has all kind of tools for optimizing your connection speed, fixing registry errors, tweaking windows settings. 

     

    I think they have a trial you can use for a while before you have to pay for it.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jul 17, 2015
    #17
  18. Sharm

    Sharm Pixel Tile Artist Veteran

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    Thank you very much!
     
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  19. Kes

    Kes Global Moderators Global Mod

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    Hi, I have an issue which happened very occasionally in the past, but is now happening every few hours.

    I'm using an HP Pavilion g series laptop, running Windows 7.

    The issue - for no apparent reason the laptop decides that I'm holding down the Ctrl key, even though I'm not and haven't used it for some time.  It is most apparent if I'm playtesting in RM as my party can run through walls etc.  If I'm on the internet, the scroll wheel on my mouse no longer scrolls, but zooms in or out and links open in new windows even when they shouldn't.  When I was in a Word document yesterday, I got the dialogue box "you're holding down the control key, do you want to ..." and I've now forgotten what the exact wording was.

    This has been for the last 3 days.  The only way to fix it is to close everything and reboot; I don't need to wait, an immediate reboot does it. The laptop is not overheating.

    Any thoughts?

    As for contact, either here or by pm.

    Thanks.
     
    #19
  20. BeardBro

    BeardBro I think this line's mostly filler. Veteran

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    @ksjp17

    The best solution for this type of problem:

    [​IMG]
    But seriously, maybe.

    The issue may be one or all of the following:
    1. The CTRL key is stuck. Most keyboards have two CTRL keys, so try to examine each one carefully.
    2. Food or debris has fallen beneath the CTRL key(s) and is lodged on the actual 'button' chip-piece.
    3. Water or liquid has gotten beneath the CTRL key and is causing a short.
    4. The driver is bad, or corrupted. To fix this, try the following:
    Creating a Restore Point
    Just in case things go south, we need to make a restore point. It's rare, but if the keyboard chipset itself is fried or there's a deeper issue on the computer, the driver simply won't reinstall correctly. So, let's make that restore point before we make any changes!
    To do this in Windows 8, go to your desktop, open the Power User Tasks menu using the Win+X key combination.
    Go to System > System Protection (left side of the menu) > 'Yes' to UAC if prompted > click the 'Create' button.
    Type in a description to help you identify the restore point later on.
    Click 'Create' again, then 'Close' when the process is finished.
    If you have another OS, follow these steps: Windows 7 Restore Point | Windows Vista Restore Point
    Uninstalling/reinstalling the keyboard driver
    Now, we need to uninstall and reinstall your keyboard driver.
    We need to open the Device Manager; there's an option for it in the Power User Tasks menu (Win+X when looking at the desktop). There's also an option for it in the 'System' menu, accessed by right-clicking on 'Computer' in the Start Menu in Win7 or WinVista.
    Expand the 'Keyboards' category.
    Try to locate your Keyboard's driver in the Keyboards category. It may have a generic name (ie, not specifically labeled).
    Right-click on your Keyboard driver, then click 'uninstall.'
    MOST IMPORTANT STEP: When you click uninstall, a box may come up asking if you want to 'delete the software from the computer or harddrive.' DO NOT check this option. The computer WILL NOT be able to reinstall your keyboard driver if you check this option. That being said, we did create a restore point, so keep your shirt on if you accidentally check this. It's reversible.
    Once the uninstall is complete, immediately reboot your PC.
    Your computer should automatically reinstall the drivers/software for your keyboard. If not, use the Restore Point to restore your PC.
    5. The ribbon connecting the keyboard to your motherboard is loose or damaged. You can Google 'remove keyboard from X', where 'X' is the brand and model of your laptop. Once the keyboard is removed, you will be able to check the ribbon to see what's going on.

    I hope this helps!
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Jul 20, 2015
    #20
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