[Survey] What economic systems do you include in your world?

What economic systems do you include in your world?


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Kupotepo

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Most nations in fantasy settings aren't hunter-gatherer tribes, and gold [G] is a common currency in RPG games. Most of the players probably do not notice the subtle change of your worldbuilding or your mechanic. I put plural nones because I understand that some of your worlds contain any nations or countries and might have a different economic system from a nation to a nation.

My intention: I would like to see if anyone thinks about this. So I am trying weird out about trying to implement the economic system. Plus all of us when we did the big project, have to balance the resources, so the resources are feeling like unlimited and incentives players to use items and products we work hard to create.

  1. Traditional trading economy [bartering] =In the RPG world, we create items exchange items directly without currency. Also, the crafting quest if you think about it. I need chicken soup. Give me chicken, water, and a seasoning. You get the chicken soup as a reward.
  2. Currency/ Bill of Exchange trading economy = In the RPG world, we just use the currency like the default or your plugin for multiple currencies.
  3. Guild economy = Look into the medieval guilds historically. In the RPG or most of the time in MMORPG, in the customize/blank slate character game, the player character gains access to a certain building which depends on which class or job he or she has chosen at the beginning of the game.
  4. Underground Economy = In the RPG world and most of the popular MMORPG, it is usually the black market/ secret market that sells SSR weapons and equipment.
  5. Inflation and Deflation economic system = some developers even tried to simulate the Supply and Demand Price Changes during peace and wartime in the game pacing.
  6. Isolationism/ Closed Economy = ok, let me explain in more of a tangle idea. Is anyone ever play The Seven Deadly Sins: Grand Cross or know about Japan history [Warring States period][The Sengoku period]? Just make it easy anyone here plays Total War: Shogun 2? Anyhow, I will talk about the substantive now. The player required to gain the favor of local people in order to buy anything there. Therefore, you required to create a relationship system that ties with economics.
  7. Local Specialize Economy = In the open-world RPG, the developers planned to make different locations have different essential items. For example, the mining town has a gem and a metal for sale. The water town has healing water for sale.
Special Thank you to @Des for inventive my deep thinking about this topic.

Thank you in advantage.

Also, if you have any more ideas or I missed something, please do not hesitate to say so. Tha way I learn something new.
 
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HumanNinjaToo

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I voted for the bill of exchange/currency option because my game is pretty much set up to exchange gold for items in the shops. I've never really put much effort into thinking about the in-game economy more than that, because it's a single player game. Honestly, I've only thought about game economy before in MMO's, so I've never really thought too much about doing anything special like this in my own game.

Maybe in some sense their exists a barter system between the player and game in the sense of earning a currency in battle by defeating enemies, then using that currency to buy skills.
 

Tsukihime

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I'm toying around with the idea of nano-replicators where you can literally turn air into any object you can think of like food, raw materials, etc.

So everyone just says "I want _____" and it's created out of thin air.
The technology can also be used to replicate itself so it costs nothing to build.

What kind of economy would that lead to? I'm not sure. Everything is free. Everything is limitless.
 

Kupotepo

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@Tsukihime, I think what you said it is a utopia or a heaven if everyone have happiness of material world in a paradise dome or it is a self-sufficient country if your nation used recycled and renewable energy most of the time. I see you like Sci-Fi world.

Also it is a idea of Brave New World game I like the Sci-Fi game if you would like to do so.
 
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Trihan

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I'm toying around with the idea of nano-replicators where you can literally turn air into any object you can think of like food, raw materials, etc.

So everyone just says "I want _____" and it's created out of thin air.
The technology can also be used to replicate itself so it costs nothing to build.

What kind of economy would that lead to? I'm not sure. Everything is free. Everything is limitless.
If the society has access to devices that can self-replicate and produce anything someone might need, the first effect I imagine would be that we would no longer need the "production" class; jobs where people create things would no longer be needed, so all we'd have would be distributors. But since the replicators are creating everything for free and can be replicated, I imagine everyone would just have a personal replicator from which they could get anything they needed, so shops would be a thing of the past as well. There would be absolutely no incentive not to supply every single person on the planet with their own since they cost nothing to copy.

So basically jobs would be all but obsolete with the exception of vital services that can't be done via replicator, money wouldn't really exist any more, and the concept of poverty/homelessness would be virtually unknown.

One thing worth noting is that those services would likely have high demand and low supply; if anyone can get anything they need via replicator, what incentive would someone have to clean toilets or sweep the streets? You'd have to come up with something to offer them that a replicator couldn't produce.
 

Kupotepo

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@Tsukihime, anyhow, how do you go about? So everything is free for players in the stores. Do you worried about the player's stock items? Or you believe in players' freedom over balancing of the economy of your game?

You and @Trihan are definitely smarter than me for sure. So your reasoning would great. Thank you.

@HumanNinjaToo, you make me think of a 3D printer and 3D printer for foods. The future is near and the rest is to make the process cheaper.
 
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HumanNinjaToo

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This reminds me of the science of the Star Trek replicator. Early episodes only really showed the replication of food, although later series showed the replication of inorganic items like weapons, clothing, and parts needed for maintenance. Although you really have to sift through the Gene Roddenberry universe for an exact explanation, the idea is that the replicator rearranges the molecules of matter. Early Star Trek replicators could only do this with certain organic compounds, while later series did pretty much anything. So the while Gene Roddenberry's replicator could create pretty much anything, it did require raw materials that would need to be rearranged, hence the need for mining on planets/meteors in distant galaxies and stuff. Really neat stuff to be honest.
 

Tsukihime

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@Tsukihime, anyhow, how do you go about? So everything is free for players in the stores. Do you worried about the players stocks items? Or you believe in players freedom over balancing of economic of your game?

You and @Trihan are definitely smarter than me for sure. So your reasoning would great. Thank you.
Even though the tech can create anything from virtually nothing (including itself), it doesn't know *how* to create it.

All products require two kinds of inputs: physical inputs such as raw material, as well as a specification that defines how the inputs should be used. Doesn't matter if you're building a house, or you're doing some potion mixing, or you're cooking steak to medium rare, or you're turning water into wine, there needs to be a very specific "blueprint" of what your product is.

So in this kind of economy, "IDEAS" become exceedingly valuable. Intellectual property is no longer about people copying your code or your methods (eg: like what patents cover and stuff) and selling it themselves, it's literally them copying everything and reproducing it instantly. Instead of reverse engineering what some hardware or software does, you're now trying to reverse engineer how a shoe was made, how a phone is constructed, etc. Patenting might be useful, but of course once you release it, everyone can recreate it. You can try to enforce laws to crack down on it, but you're fighting an uphill battle (eg: everyone in the world)

Which means trade is still required. Money might still be a medium of exchange, but now counterfeits run rampant. To counter the issue with physical currency, they've switched to cryptocurrencies where artificial limits are imposed in order to address the problem of inflation.

So actually I think even with nano-replicators as a means of production, society can still function the same way it does now: as long as someone holds a monopoly over something people WANT, they can then force you to offer something in exchange that they value.

Think about concerts: tens of thousands of people attend them. Anyone can create instructions or sing, but not everyone can get tens of thousands of people to pay big money to come watch you on stage. It's a similar idea.
 
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Frostorm

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What kind of economy would that lead to? I'm not sure. Everything is free. Everything is limitless.
That would be called a "post-scarcity" economy/society (is it really an economy at that point?).

Btw @Kupotepo, inflation/deflation are aspects of an economy, not an economic system in of itself.

But to answer your poll, I chose Currency and Local.

I love Isaac Arthur's videos when it comes to futuristic topics, like post-scarcity:
 

Kupotepo

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@Frostorm, I just jam it in there and it is true of what you said I see people in past come up with ideas. Just ask if people might try and success.

Intellectual Property as a valuable items like a piece of code. Great idea, @Tsukihime. Ok, you create an idea of first come, first serve and quota system.

If everyone go to the hospital, but it does means the hospital can accept everyone in at the same time.

Hahaha, @Des and @lianderson are here such an honor to see you.
 
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Insomniac_Warrior

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For the most civilized cities in my games, I've used currency as a means of getting standard materials, food, equips, and a few legendary tier items. It has always been a no-brainer for me.

Outlying cities unrecognized by the primary ruling units in my games will almost always have their own bartering system, as they've had to get by without the luxuries provided by a central economy. I reward the player for recognizing, going through the hoops, and using these systems by allowing access to unique mechanics, spells, and even more powerful equips that they cannot acquire anywhere else.

I think the economic system in any game definitely has to vary upon context, and it is fun to put a unorthodox method of trading as long as it is engaging, immersive, and most importantly, rewarding.
 

RachelTheSeeker

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Depends on the world, but both of mine use a relatively standardized monetary system. It's just easier for JRPGs, but I would love to figure out a good way to barter in my apocalyptic setting. Oddly enough, the main currency in both my settings is inspired by a USD quarter coin. :p

The fantastical province of Arakhavia in A Lion in Scarlet (and by proxy A Maned Lioness) uses a silver piece standard: a coin called the Falcon. It's emblazoned with a bird of prey, due to falconry being big in medieval Greece, Persia and Egypt -- Arakhavia, and its neighboring Nakrona and Brigalia, respectively mirror those Mediterranean nations. I might include a separate currency for the northern lands, inspired by the Kievan Rus, and exchange rates for their own money.

I chose silver pieces instead of gold because, in D&D lore, silver coins serve as the foundation for most economies. Think of the silver Falcon as $1 USD, the gold piece as $10, an electrum piece (a naturally-occurring gold-and-silver alloy) as $5 , and a copper piece as 10 cents.

In the overgrown ruins of Apocalypse Fox, not yet seen in a game, the standard currency is nicknamed Prez. Without a proper mint and slowly-deteriorating paper money, any weathered USD coins are a lot more valuable. Like Caps in classic Fallout, they're not the main form of exchange. There's a barter system in place, with "Prez" being used to cover a difference in exchange worth. For the most part, only traders and sizeable settlements really get a use out of Prez exchange.

Instead of being named after a bald eagle on the USD quarter, which was the inspiration for Arakhavia's Falcon, I went with the US presidents depicted on American coins. And because of the scarcity of bigger currency coins, even $10 USD is considered a lot of money in Apoc-Fox.

For my other two games of note? Forsaken Isle has no use for currency, but is (retroactively) based in Arakhavia and the ALIS setting. Its sequel, The Painted Knight, uses Mana as its "currency". With the party trapped in a pocket dimension, they're able to use the magical energies of slain monsters and demons to create (finite amounts of) consumables.
 
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Kupotepo

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@RachelTheSeeker, since your reasoning of making the currencies, I think you might want to look at the Roman debasing of currency. Maybe you can see different way of how ancient civilization mixing metals lol. Sometimes the rulers put less of valuable metal into making coins and replace them with cheap metal as a replacement of the impurity of gold or silver.

Economicist:
"lowering the value of a currency, particularly one based on a precious metal, by adding metal of inferior value."

 
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RachelTheSeeker

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@Kupotepo, that is fascinating to know. From a lore perspective in an ALiS "expanded universe" (read: any prose set in that setting), that seems viable. In game terms though, it just feels like theory. On top of that, Arakhavia and its surroundings are relatively stable. I can see use for how Roman currency worked, but it doesn't seem necessary for most narratives. I guess technically, the electrum pieces are supposed to be devaluing gold for an in-between coin, as it's a value between a $10 and $1 approximation.

Still, I appreciate the share. Hadn't thought of it, and I like learning about history based around the Mediterranean and the nations it interacted with.
 

Pix3M

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In real life, it's the economy that decides how you spend your time, what job you work, what standard of living you get, where housing built, how they are built. I think a thought out political-economy is probably the best possible backbone if someone wants a realistic and believable world design.

Is your world run by masters and slaves? A caste system with lords and serfs? Capitalists and wage-workers? Or, something else?
Do your characters work? What do they work as? Who is their boss, if any? Who do they listen to? I think it's details like these that separates believable worlds than worlds which NPC's are sprinkled across the world with no semblance of a backstory.

With the few RPG's I've played, my favorite is Enderal: Forgotten Stories. A feudal caste system. Every NPC has a place in life. They are all added into the game with purpose. I feel no NPC was wasted just to make poorly-thought-out filler.

I'm personally working with a socialist society set in a far future. It has elements of Stalinism and Maoism but also elements that are considered "real communism".

Each neighborhood is its own commune which are usually specialized in a trade or field. People are (usually) free to enter or leave a commune for whatever lifestyle they want. Some communes are more successful than others. I'm planning to design one commune for military training, one for artistic/cultural pursuits, biology/health/genetics, an industrial/manufacturing commune and a "failed" commune where people mostly go when they're tired of life.

I'm working with a less dramatic interpretation of post-scarcity than Tsukihime that there are some commodities that "there's more than enough for everyone". Healing items will be plentiful but counterbalanced by a low maximum item level and by how only drink items are usable in battle and only food items recover health. Post-scarcity with food is one thing but post-scarcity with large expensive hardware like jet fighters IMO is extremely difficult to pull off.
 

Kupotepo

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@Pix3M, thank you for an answer for taking the survey and express your ideas here.
My world is not united governance. Yes, there is a nation that has a slavery system, while another nation has a caste system with lords and serfs.
However, my world has two inequality if a location has an abundance of magic, there is a lack of electric energy. However, if a location has an abundance of electric energy, there is a lack of magic.

it's details like these that separates believable worlds than worlds which NPC's are sprinkled across the world with no semblance of a backstory.
I tried my best to do that.

I'm personally working with a socialist society set in a far future. It has elements of Stalinism and Maoism but also elements that are considered "real communism".
ok, that will be an interesting system for sure.

Wow, your commune towns would create a good conflict for sure because of all of them have different interests.
 
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Tai_MT

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I tend to just deal in a "regular currency". Typically, this is "Gold", but it has other forms. In a game, this is done for "simplicity". Secret of Evermore had 4 currencies and the exchange rate between them was... not great. Which, you would typically see in systems with multiple currencies across multiple cultures. Basically, it lead to a lot of "exchange currency for cheapest you can get, then travel to the kingdom where you're spending virtually nothing for things you need". Especially after you got a flying machine. I was frequently trading "Credits" (last currency in the game, from the Future Society) for "Talons" (caveman currency) and buying my healing items in those kingdoms as well as any alchemy ingredients they had access to. For each "Credit", you could get like 8 Talons. You could buy most healing items for around 30-200 Talons. Or, if you did it in Future Land, about the same amount of Credits. Which means, you were paying 8x as much for basic healing items as you would've been otherwise.

Anyway, I don't like mucking about with such things and allowing players to break the game in such a way.

One of my games has a "barter" type system. You earn "Influence" (your XP bar and levels) and then trade that in for "favors". It is a newly established society where survival is more important than riches (currency literally has no value). So, you trade your influence for things like sword training, materials you need, restoratives, etcetera. The more "well liked" you are (your influence is basically derived from helping the society thrive... you get it from killing monsters, completing quests for the society, etcetera. Helping out), the more access to things you get and the more people are willing to do "favors" for you.

My other game just uses the basic "Gold" economy. Trade your cash for whatever.

In game terms, it really is the most simple way to handle things. A single currency that can be exchanged anywhere.

It makes more sense to "diversify" currencies if you're dealing with a book you're writing. "Games" just doesn't communicate multiple currencies very well, and it's often useless from a gameplay perspective. But "multiple currencies" in a book you're writing makes a lot more sense.

For example, in one of the books I'm writing, I use "minerals and gems" as currencies. The value of each currency is based upon what is used to make up that currency. Copper, Silver, Gold, Platinum. The size of the coin determines its value (they primarily weigh these coins if they're not familiar with the currency of another kingdom and exchange them based on weight). The "Primary" currency are coins minted as half a centimeter thick and 3 centimeters in diameter of a material. Gems are a "variable" currency which fetch different prices all over the planet. Anyway, anyone can "mint" these coins in the world (there's no such thing as counterfeiting), but coins are also removed from circulation by some professions in the creation of weapons, armor, other metal goods, and sometimes magic items (it's a fantasy setting. Magic is insanely rare, but does exist, and anyone with an enchanted anything has usually paid several fortunes to obtain it). Coins are, essentially, melted down into whatever they need to be made into. When they are, they can be exchanged for more than their weight value.

Anyway, using the "Primary" currency (this is simply the most widespread format of currency), about 100 copper equals 1 silver. 200 Silver equals about 1 gold. 5,000 Gold equals about 1 Platinum. Platinum is an insanely rare material that only one place on the entire planet has access to, and they have found a way to "alloy" it in order to make very durable weapons and armor. 1 Platinum Coin is about enough money to live comfortably for a month without having to work at all (as in, live like an Upper-Middle class member of society.).

Now you can kind of see why it makes more sense to do more with currency in a book than in a video game. How do you even transfer a system like this into a video game at all? How would the player manage it? How would shops?

Do most shops even have enough "change" to break 1 Platinum Coin? What if all you have is 1 Platinum Coin and you just want to buy a single sack of flour? Well, you can't get that sack of flour. Good luck finding anyone other than a noble or a king who can exchange that currency for you.

How would that even translate to other people's cultures in the real world? 1 Platinum Coin is probably equivalent to $4,000 (US Currency). Can you imagine going to your local store with a $4,000 bill and trying to buy a single sack of flour with that? Imagine trying to communicate that to a player in a game. How do you even do that except in a Tabletop RPG?

Most often, it's best to just stick with a single currency that serves a single function. It doesn't break the "gameplay" of your game that way.
 

Kupotepo

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@Tai_MT, thank you for sharing your thought and your knowledge about this topic.

Now you can kind of see why it makes more sense to do more with currency in a book than in a video game. How do you even transfer a system like this into a video game at all? How would the player manage it? How would shops?
I believe in Yanfly MV multiple currencies may make that kind of functional. Hopefully, I hope.

I agree with your assessment that multiple currencies without a restriction to certain areas. It will lead to players go get items in the chaper areas. It is true that when I have to explain to players, it will be confusing for sure. That is another problem.
Wow, you are the writer that why I see you write in really clear and concise writing style.
 
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Milennin

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Either just gold to trade for items, or none at all. I only have 1 actual shop across all the games I've made, I just prefer to give items through treasure chests from beating challenges or exploring, or do away with items altogether.
 

Pix3M

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I remember playing some merchant flash games mid-00's with multiple currencies. I think that mechanic works best in games that are focused on trade, but usually that's not the focus of an RPG. In real life, prices are never intended to be balanced towards any semblance of fairness and merchants will always find ways to exploit the system.
 

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