Using kickstarter to kickstart your title/studio

endgametech

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Yeah, it's the like the third step to set up payment info. Won't let you get past it without a valid Amazon account.

There are kickstarter alternatives though, for those who want to pursue crowdfunding but aren't in the US/UK. Indiegogo.com and rockethub.com are two of the bigger ones.
 

BILL_NYE_THO

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Getting back on topic, I can't stress enough that if you want to do this, you must do your homework and research, exhaustively, which kickstarters worked, and why, and which ones didn't, and why. Research how much projects ask, what makes a game enticing, what helps get yourself out there, etc.

Kickstarters only work if you market yourself effectively. Be very conscious of this.
 

Jef299

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Why not just sell it on your website?

Why did they use Kick Starter to get it on CD?

Digital games are the new wave, and

using kick starter to get your game on CD shouldn't appeal to you. Here's why: Go into nearly any store that

sells computer games are you're going to see:

Some Blizzard games

The Sim games

Some popular casual games

And that's about it. In fact many of the stores now carry cards for digital download codes.

This isn't 2000 or 1999 when PC games took up half the shelves.
 

BILL_NYE_THO

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Why not just sell it on your website?

Why did they use Kick Starter to get it on CD?

Digital games are the new wave, and

using kick starter to get your game on CD shouldn't appeal to you. Here's why: Go into nearly any store that

sells computer games are you're going to see:

Some Blizzard games

The Sim games

Some popular casual games

And that's about it. In fact many of the stores now carry cards for digital download codes.

This isn't 2000 or 1999 when PC games took up half the shelves.
Topic creator wasn't using kickstarter to get his game on CD. That was another case mentioned later in the topic. TC wants to use kickstarter to raise funds so that he can afford to spend more time working on his game.
 

Shaz

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As this is a topic that everyone has opinions on, it's getting derailed very easily and by multiple people (including me). Please try and keep comments restricted to the OP's original question
 

Traveling Bard

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@Bill, so far I haven't seen anyone with a demo on kickstarter. Most appear to have very clear ideas on what they want to do and how they want to reward investors. Having their names put into the game as NPCs or subjects of important questlines seems to be popular. I'm really bad with naming characters so that might actually work in my favor, haha. I was also thinking, since every character uses a specific elemental(name, personality, etc), I could have a reward be the naming of the elemental as well. I'll be honest though, I've seen it where they reward the backers with entire design elements for main characters and I think that's wrong. The main story line is yours, you backers can have npcs and even a questline dedicated to em, but not the main. Just my opinion. Another popular aspect that i've seen is a youtube video of either the designer talking about what the money goes to as well as showing off the game OR just showing off the game via a youtube video. I'm thinking about doing a video where I talk while showing gameplay elements/screenshots and have a link below it to the demo. Perhaps if they see my handsome mug it'll help, haha. 
 

Ari

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Perhaps a largely less popular viewpoint, but one from personal experience, is I am now a tried and true believer in, "If you can't fund it somehow yourself, then don't do it."

I think like anything, unfortunately, when something good happens for someone - everyone rushes to replicate it somehow.  That's human nature after all.  But in truth, people miss a big thing in many instances - particularly when it comes to dreaming big.  And that is some of those success stories simply have factors specific to the situation that you simply can't "Just add water and stir" type forumulae to, no matter how much it may seem to make sense on the surface.   People can't bottle or encapsulate things like:  raw talent and innate skill, heartfelt, sold out passion for something, personal determination, unique aspects of those involved personalities, abilities, etc. It's sort of like, for example, why there are soooo many diet and self help programs out on the market, right?  The Atkins works great for some, while others do better on Weight Watchers and still others do well on Nutrisystem and so on...  The truth is there is no one RIGHT or WRONG answer here.  Just a lot of complex factors truly make up why these things work for some and don't work for others.  The same is true with those great "success stories" we're always seeing and reading about.

Now, mind you, I'm not out to destroy anyone's dreams here - I'm a big dreamer myself.  However, the truth remains that sometimes, no matter how good our ideas are, they aren't meant to be. I believe that firmly.  And if I can't find a way, by say, taking on extra work, selling some things or taking out my own loan if I know I can pay it back, to get something accomplished, then I firmly believe I shouldn't be doing it. (Sadly, that's a lesson I learned much later in life than I would have liked and only learned after one very huge, horrible FAIL)  So I'm not a big fan of things like Kickstarter as rule.  Keep in mind, however, this is just yet another opinion, and based on _my_ personal beliefs and experiences.

But i do very much like what some of the others here have already stated - and that is my firm belief that it is NOT "pitch perfect" music, stellar graphics or even a solid story that makes a good game - but rather a culmination of all those things combined with the one magical ingredient that cannot be "faked" or generated or bought - passion.  If you truly love and believe in what you are doing - whether it is writing lines of code, singing a song or sculpting a vase - or of course, making a game - somehow that passion in us, that love or determination or use whatever word you want to describe that "it" factor - seems to osmote from us into whatever it is we're working on.  And it's that rather intangible element that draws people to what's been created.  I've seen the BUTT ugliest games in the world doing exceedingly well - and I've seen some of the most GORGEOUS million dollar budget games with breathtaking effects and custom soundtracks that were award worthy that ultimately SUCKED royally.  Granted, most games that do well are a good balance of eye candy, ear candy and good balance in design - I'm just saying it doesn't take "perfection" or "professional" resources, necessarily to make a success formula or in this case, a good game.

Anyway, I just wanted to add that bit in - please don't be offended. I hope you're successful - and many people using Kickstarter do get their funding.  But just take it from an old broad with lots of life experience, the best things in life - including our successes really come from how determined and passionate we are about seeing them through - as cheesy as that might sound.

Good luck!
 

Traveling Bard

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I had a long response but someone called whilr I was typing it and I lost it all....bottom line is I know I could and most likely will fall flat on my face when I throw the game out there but if I don't try I'll never know. I'll learn from my failures and be better for it. I would also like to say that I WILL make this game regardless of funding from kickstarter....it'll just take a lot longer. I know it's a shot in the dark asking for funding but like I said, won't know unless I try.
 

themo

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I play games for content, freedom of choice and scope... the engine and graphics doesn't matter anywhere near as much as the idea around which the game was built. One of my favorite games of all time is Zangbad, a roguelike game that had NO graphics originally yet i have played that game pretty regularly for many many years. 
 

endgametech

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I had a long response but someone called whilr I was typing it and I lost it all....bottom line is I know I could and most likely will fall flat on my face when I throw the game out there but if I don't try I'll never know. I'll learn from my failures and be better for it. I would also like to say that I WILL make this game regardless of funding from kickstarter....it'll just take a lot longer. I know it's a shot in the dark asking for funding but like I said, won't know unless I try.
That is absolutely the best attitude you can have, both in taking the shot with Kickstarter and in pushing on forward even if it doesn't work out. Best of luck and feel free to shoot me a PM when the KS gets running! 
 

Tsukitsune

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Perhaps a largely less popular viewpoint, but one from personal experience, is I am now a tried and true believer in, "If you can't fund it somehow yourself, then don't do it."

I think like anything, unfortunately, when something good happens for someone - everyone rushes to replicate it somehow.  That's human nature after all.  But in truth, people miss a big thing in many instances - particularly when it comes to dreaming big.  And that is some of those success stories simply have factors specific to the situation that you simply can't "Just add water and stir" type forumulae to, no matter how much it may seem to make sense on the surface.   People can't bottle or encapsulate things like:  raw talent and innate skill, heartfelt, sold out passion for something, personal determination, unique aspects of those involved personalities, abilities, etc. It's sort of like, for example, why there are soooo many diet and self help programs out on the market, right?  The Atkins works great for some, while others do better on Weight Watchers and still others do well on Nutrisystem and so on...  The truth is there is no one RIGHT or WRONG answer here.  Just a lot of complex factors truly make up why these things work for some and don't work for others.  The same is true with those great "success stories" we're always seeing and reading about.

Now, mind you, I'm not out to destroy anyone's dreams here - I'm a big dreamer myself.  However, the truth remains that sometimes, no matter how good our ideas are, they aren't meant to be. I believe that firmly.  And if I can't find a way, by say, taking on extra work, selling some things or taking out my own loan if I know I can pay it back, to get something accomplished, then I firmly believe I shouldn't be doing it. (Sadly, that's a lesson I learned much later in life than I would have liked and only learned after one very huge, horrible FAIL)  So I'm not a big fan of things like Kickstarter as rule.  Keep in mind, however, this is just yet another opinion, and based on _my_ personal beliefs and experiences.

But i do very much like what some of the others here have already stated - and that is my firm belief that it is NOT "pitch perfect" music, stellar graphics or even a solid story that makes a good game - but rather a culmination of all those things combined with the one magical ingredient that cannot be "faked" or generated or bought - passion.  If you truly love and believe in what you are doing - whether it is writing lines of code, singing a song or sculpting a vase - or of course, making a game - somehow that passion in us, that love or determination or use whatever word you want to describe that "it" factor - seems to osmote from us into whatever it is we're working on.  And it's that rather intangible element that draws people to what's been created.  I've seen the BUTT ugliest games in the world doing exceedingly well - and I've seen some of the most GORGEOUS million dollar budget games with breathtaking effects and custom soundtracks that were award worthy that ultimately SUCKED royally.  Granted, most games that do well are a good balance of eye candy, ear candy and good balance in design - I'm just saying it doesn't take "perfection" or "professional" resources, necessarily to make a success formula or in this case, a good game.

Anyway, I just wanted to add that bit in - please don't be offended. I hope you're successful - and many people using Kickstarter do get their funding.  But just take it from an old broad with lots of life experience, the best things in life - including our successes really come from how determined and passionate we are about seeing them through - as cheesy as that might sound.

Good luck!
If everyone had that viewpoint, then there'd be alot less games.  If they had your belief, we'd see no more AAA titles or hardly any games period.  Alot of games need funding from some source, period.  Hell not only games, we'd see alot less projects of any sort.  If you self fund it, it doesn't mean the project is going to be successful.  We see failures from all different areas, whether huge funded AAA game, indie, or self funded, there are failures and successes everywhere.  So self funding determining if your project is "meant to be" is just silly.  Where your money comes from doesn't mean anything.  The only difference is if you fail using crowdfunding, publisher, etc, you not only let down yourself but the people who backed your idea.  But that I believe is a risk worth taking, and I'm pretty sure alot of the people who back projects understand these risks.  Success is never guaranteed after all.

______________________________________

On a side note, can anyone give me a list of the successful and failed RM kickstarters?  Besides the one Archea already listed. 
 

The Florana Princess

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Getting back onto the topic of where to 'kickstart' your game, have any of you tried pozible.com? I just put my game up there today and although it's a less popular website, I've already had a substantial pledge. It's also open to more countries (I'm from Australia). So if you're looking for a place, there's that option too
 

The Florana Princess

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I was originally going to put mine up on indiegogo but there are just sooo many games on there, and I noticed the games made with rpgmaker get flamed quite a lot. With Pozible it seems to be a more 'refined' type of person that goes there to suss out projects. Not sure refined is the right word but you know what i mean. There's a different mentality.
 

phoenix_rossy

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I didn't have time to read all the comments (apologies) but noticed the title and wanted to say that yes, go for it. A Kickstarter campaign with a clearly-defined project can go particularly well. I'd recommend putting a demo on your page too.

I myself have kickstarted my project (in the signature), and I managed to raise around £3000, which is nearly $5,000. After rewards and shipping I was left with about half that to actually spend on development.

I personally don't think there is anything wrong with using the RTP as a base, however I have made many edits to the RTP tileset, and use Thalzon's battlers. The vast majority of characters in the game are from the generator with custom assets added. In short, as long as you've clearly put the effort in, and you're not asking for stupid amounts of money (I only asked for £300), you'll be well-received in the Kickstarter community (which is full of super-supportive people, by the way).

I have seen 'pedigree' RTP games on kickstarter not do so well, and for good reason. If you're looking to use RPG Maker as a way to make a game super-fast with stock assets, few people are interested.

I'm kinda sleep deprived right now (Beta testing about 12 hours a day 0.o), so I'm sorry if this post doesn't flow well or read properly. Good luck!
 

Tuomo L

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Service announcement to all RPGmakers who are interested in having a fundraiser for their project

Keep in mind in some countries, in fact many of them you need a police permit to have a fundraiser. This includes Kickstarter, Indiegogo and any donation drive in Facebooks and such. You also need to submit the total you make and need to be of 16 years, 18 in London. (Other countries may have specific laws, ask your local authorities for details) If not, you are facing major criminal charges and tax increase. There was a news about how a guy was having a fundraiser for his dog's operation in Facebook and police closed the page and he got into a lot of hot water because of it. 

Also fundraiser donations will have to go through tax, just as any sort of an income and if it exceeds certain levels, you have to pay extra income tax. Not many people realize this and they just jump into things like these as if it'd be no big deal but when there's real money involved, there's almost always red tape behind to get it.
 
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MyLordRobinson

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Do you have earlier projects you've been working on in order to establish your credit as a developer?
 

Lordslimjim

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Sorry this might seem off topic

But what are the penalties for starting a project via kick start getting donations then folding on it.

I know that it's Gota have something it just seems way to easy to con innocent people (investors donators etc) out o cash if not :/

This probably comes under the tax side of things under charities. Just all seems abit lose around the edges.

(Not to give anyone ideas) what's stoping some one putting up a game creation help one target 5k

Getting 2k then saying sorry not gona happen project has folded :/
 

gRaViJa

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At Kickstarter you either get all (5k in your example) or nothing. Indiegogo however works different: you get wathever people pledge to you. Also, There are no penalties if you stop the project, except being labeled as a huge jackass of course.
 

Lordslimjim

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Ahh ok so kick start you have to hit your target

But beeing labeled ass a huge jackass isn't really much of a punishment if you creat an account under a false name :/ not sure how easy or if possible that would be (well I'm sure it's possible after all identity theft)

I just think that better security should be placed that's all
 

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