What are themes in your RPG game(s)?

What are themes in your game(s)?


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Kupotepo

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I just moved this up ok. I just think that new members might want to take this survey and interested. Thank you and I hope you have a good day sofar.
 
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trouble time

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Law vs. Chaos, i think adding a good/evil axis to alignment was one of Gary Gygax's worst decisions when adapting alignment from Micheal Moorcock. Law in the setting isnt necessarily good, as the demons of the setting (and lucifer in Micheal Moorcock's own multiverse) are lawful. It represents civilization and stability, but also death and stagnation. Chaos represent disorder and barbarism, but also creativity and freedom. The ultimate victory of law is unchanging stagnation where nothing new can happen, while the ultimate victory of chaos means nothing can exist because nothing can have form as it always changes to something else. Neitrality represents balance, but is too lukewarm to change the world, neutrality can't exist of its own power only law or chaos can push the world to balance, mkst people are neutral and so they can't truly change things. They may be individually powerful, but their self centered ideology make it hard for them to truly tip the Cosmic Balance (in Moorcocks cosmology as opposed to mine neutrality is the great balance and technically rules over law and chaos, and it can act, but does so by creating an eternal champion of law or chaos, it doesnt assert itself it strengthens or weakens one of the other two.)
 

Kupotepo

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@trouble time, thank you for your time.

I just realized the difference between the theme and the moral. I am still learning every day.
A story theme is a broad conceptual philosophy that an author wishes to convey through their literary work. An idea the author hopes the audience will mine for deeper meaning. [Because it is a really difficult question, no single person can answer with direct knowledge. But we like to think about those topics.]
Morals are what the author would like the reader to learn.

@trouble time, that is an awesome story you create there. Individual actions vs Society restrictions is an interesting setting. Interesting questions of how much an individual's action can truly change society for betterment or worsen.
 
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Kupotepo

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bump, hopefully, new members or some members who would express their vision of their game. Thank you.
 

RoseReveries

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If I had to pick one I guess it would kind of be humanity versus technology? But my game's story is a little bit complicated. Basically humanity has to decide between turning off the magical vents that concentrate magical energy in order to live longer healthier lives, or keeping them on and being able to more easily use magic.
 

Kupotepo

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@RoseReveries, thank you for your input and nice to meet. Welcome to the community. :kaohi:
 
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Tai_MT

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I'm not sure this is on your list at all. Most of my games are about "nebulous" things as well as Human Nature. Often the point of my works is just that people are people. That is, misconceptions are easy to create and believe in. People build their own delusions to explain their version of reality to themselves.

The vast majority of what I write is just people trying to get through the day. They're usually thrust into unfortunate circumstances or situations which require they dig deep in order to solve problems or cope with issues.

I think my favorite concept that I tend to deal with is, "the nature of destiny". What I mean is that I play on both ends of the argument. Things are set in stone no matter what you do... and you can fight your fate and create a new future. I've told both kinds of stories. Not because the end point of those stories is interesting, but in how you can twist the nature of those stories is very interesting.

A concept I revisit a lot (mostly because of its writing potential) is simply called "The Fateless". That is, a person is a "chosen one" simply because they are the only one in existence that doesn't have their entire life set in stone. Their life has no plan. Their future cannot be predicted. They could live an absolutely ordinary and normal life and never know they don't have a destiny. Or, they could try to become powerful and popular through their own ambitions. These characters have no special powers. Their only power is that when they interact with people, they also change the fates of the people they directly interact with. They don't "free" those people from their destiny, they simply rewrite their destiny.

I enjoy this concept because it's fun to play around with. Does altering the destiny of one person alter others like a butterfly effect? Or, does it only affect them and fate doesn't change at all for other people involved? What about a person who realizes that they're "Fateless" and can change things just by interacting with them, and yet have no idea what those consequences would be? What sort of pressure would that put on a person? What if a world knew about "The Fateless" and took measures to either maximize their potential on the world or try to minimize the effects? What does "everyone has a fate" even mean in terms of the Lore of the world? What does it say about the afterlife? The nature of a soul? Who or what is actually pulling the strings and assigning these Fates? Why is this one person not assigned one? Is The Fateless a liberator or an agent of chaos?

But, even with that, the stories aren't about all the destiny stuff. They're about how people react to it. What does a concept like that do to people? To society? To the very person it pertains to?

I like to write about the unseen forces and make them "seen" to write about how that affects human nature. Or, how it shapes the world because of human nature.
 

Kupotepo

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@Tai_MT, thank you for thanking the survey and join the discussion.

The vast majority of what I write is just people trying to get through the day. They're usually thrust into unfortunate circumstances or situations which require they dig deep in order to solve problems or cope with issues.
Do you refer to human vs. human, human vs. society, or human vs. himself or herself?

I think my favorite concept that I tend to deal with is, "the nature of destiny". What I mean is that I play on both ends of the argument. Things are set in stone no matter what you do... and you can fight your fate and create a new future.
I listed it on the main thread about Free will vs. Destiny, but the poll choices are limited to 10 choices that I can put there, sorry about that.
Fate and free will: It can be easy to give yourself a headache when debating whether life is pre-determined or a function of your free will. The theme of fate versus free will delves deeper into these questions to hopefully provide the answer that you are looking for.
That is, a person is a "chosen one" simply because they are the only one in existence that doesn't have their entire life set in stone. Their life has no plan. Their future cannot be predicted.
Are you thinking about the character: "I am the last of cyclopes or the Last Airbender"?

But, even with that, the stories aren't about all the destiny stuff. They're about how people react to it. What does a concept like that do to people? To society? To the very person it pertains to?
Ok, that is interesting. Your theme is about individual vs. societal control. Individuals cared or not cared about go up the society ladders.

What is why I am interested in everyone here theme? Your thinking resonated back to me about the human imagination and curiosity about the unknown what the game wants the viewers to think about it. Like you said about the parallel universe, what will happen to us?

What does "everyone has a fate" even mean in terms of the Lore of the world? What does it say about the afterlife? The nature of a soul? Who or what is actually pulling the strings and assigning these Fates? Why is this one person not assigned one? Is The Fateless a liberator or an agent of chaos?
Many people who make the RPG game and anime like this theme. And questions themselves heavy for sure about. Is what I do matter if that person believes in destiny? If humans have free will, how do you explain mistakes?

I like to write about the unseen forces and make them "seen" to write about how that affects human nature. Or, how it shapes the world because of human nature.
Is that personification? I see FF characters do that a lot like the warrior of light which represents light and hope. The people complain about 1D characters. It's really different job to do like find a pin in the sea.
 
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Pearsona

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Moribunderland has heavy themes of perseverance, considering the situation I've thrust the characters into is extremely bleak, but through the course of the story there is still hope and happiness to be found. I feel like, if you're going to make a game with themes of mental health, you will inevitably end up telling a story of perseverance.
 

Tai_MT

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@Tai_MT, thank you for thanking the survey and join the discussion.


Do you refer to human vs. human, human vs. society, or human vs. himself or herself?
Humans against life. Sometimes, bad things just happen to people. Sometimes, people have bad things coming to them. Sometimes, people just do terrible things to each other for very human reasons.

My stories are just people trying to get through the day and deal with what's in front of them.

Are you thinking about the character: "I am the last of cyclopes or the Last Airbender"?
Not sure "The Last Airbender" even applies. Dunno what the last of the cyclopes is either.

I'm talking about the trope of "The Chosen One". Someone is "The Chosen One" because they've got some power or exception to rules or something.

But, I like to make my "Chosen One" just a person who can freely make choices. Their fate isn't set in stone. They're free to be whatever they want. Heroes. Homeless people. Whatever.

Ok, that is interesting. Your theme is about individual vs. societal control. Individuals cared or not cared about go up the society ladders.

What is why I am interested in everyone here theme? Your thinking resonated back to me about the human imagination and curiosity about the unknown what the game wants the viewers to think about it. Like you said about the parallel universe, what will happen to us?
It's more about "what happens to people and society when the very fabric of reality and the universe doesn't apply to a single person".

That probably makes it sound less interesting, but I generally like such concepts.

Many people who make the RPG game and anime like this theme. And questions themselves heavy for sure about. Is what I do matter if that person believes in destiny? If humans have free will, how do you explain mistakes?
I like the theme in a different context. Other people in the setting have destinies, but these people don't know what their destinies are. They operate under the illusion of free will. They have no way to know whether any choice they make will turn out, but they know that it's all "destined". Then, you introduce a person who doesn't have a Destiny and their "free will" isn't actually an illusion. Any choice they make ripples those they interact with. There are no oracles to tell anyone what their destiny is.

Is that personification? I see FF characters do that a lot like the warrior of light which represents light and hope. The people complain about 1D characters. It's really different job to do like find a pin in the sea.
Sometimes, I make those "unseen forces" into a personification. Sometimes, it's just left very vague and up to interpretation. And... other times... it's an eldritch horror coming to eat your sanity.

It all just depends on what I'm trying to write for the characters. What reinforces what the reader/game player is meant to take away from the experience. Or, what they're meant to be questioning.

Or, sometimes, it's just fun to invent Lore for things we take for granted.
 

Kupotepo

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@Tai_MT, I meant like Avatar: The Last Airbender who has an ability to transfer the spacial knowledge to another. He can choose to just end the line of succession or keep the line going. What I understand you talk about the freedom of choice, correct?

I'm talking about the trope of "The Chosen One". Someone is "The Chosen One" because they've got some power or exception to rules or something.
Take it for granted that they are The Only One. These characters have been chosen by some force and they are now the only ones capable of resolving the plot.
I understand now, thank you. I never understand why it is really popular.

But, I like to make my "Chosen One" just a person who can freely make choices. Their fate isn't set in stone. They're free to be whatever they want. Heroes. Homeless people. Whatever.
I agree with you, so I understand you, correct. :kaothx:

Then, you introduce a person who doesn't have a Destiny and their "free will" isn't actually an illusion. Any choice they make ripples those they interact with. There are no oracles to tell anyone what their destiny is.
That is so true. The writer has predeterminate their fates. The characters think they have free will, but we are the decider who live or die [our worlds]. haha:LZSangel:
Or am I oversimplified of what you are thinking?

Sometimes, I make those "unseen forces" into a personification. Sometimes, it's just left very vague and up to interpretation. And... other times... it's an eldritch horror coming to eat your sanity.
It is fearful that is turn to be funny. It reminds me of Lovecraftian horror.
Thank you for taking to me about the behind curtain of what makes the game unique and interesting.
 
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The_Sarah

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I'm a big fan of individual vs society in terms of what lengths one is willing to go to as an individual to maintain a thriving peaceful society.

Shan't go into more detail than that for spoiler reasons, but cool to see lots of people also like that topic in a broader perspective.

Nice thread :)
 

Kupotepo

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@The_Sarah, Thank you for taking the survey. Thank you for sharing the code too. You see I care enough and try to know a little about your activities. :kaoluv:
 

RachelTheSeeker

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This is mostly theory, though some themes can be seen in my finished games.

Love isn't always romantic or familial in my games, but it's often about the power of friendship. Tawny, Zeke and Carol came together as first-time adventurers in Forsaken Isle. In The Painted Knight, Tawny called those lovable bastards of hers together for a favor. Only through their teamwork and friendship did they survive both outings. For A Maned Lioness, Raziya learns to trust the villagers that the motherly innkeeper knows and loves, and her eventual faith is rewarded. In the eventual game A Lion in Scarlet, Raziya learns she cannot face the world alone, for adventures and for day-to-day life.

Good vs Evil not on a cosmic scale, but from personal endeavors. For my WIP, A Lion in Scarlet, Raziya will meet her nemesis for the first time; both ladies are on opposite sides of a inciting tragedy for their families, and both changed as people in opposite ways. Because of the events of Forsaken Isle, Zeke questions himself and his motives, sealing his wicked war-magic away by the time of The Painted Knight. And Raziya's innate goodness overcomes her sense of justice, when she learns the true motives of the big boss in A Maned Lioness.

Death lingers in the painful backstories of my planned cast for A Lion in Scarlet, and well as a future project for RM called Apocalypse Fox. Both Raziya of ALiS and Dana of Apoc-Fox share a defining tragedy: the death of their fathers. Both took those deaths harsh, but the pain changed their personalities and motivations in opposite ways. I've equated Raziya to a comedy mask, and Dana to a tragedy mask, for a reason. Lastly, when I introduce her into ALiS proper, a third OC named Nazreen suffers from guilt for deaths she couldn't stop, warping her psyche in a third way.

Perseverance is part-and-parcel to Raziya's personal journey, but most of it is backstory. Some will be touched on, when I complete my current jam game on RPG Maker Network. Stay tuned.

Justice is a subverted and minor theme for me. In A Maned Lioness, Raziya's good nature overcomes her code of societal honor, showing less-than-lawful mercy to a defeated villain. She sees something in the bizarre bandit that others would not, saving him from a cruel fate.

Courage and Heroism are a big theme, especially the latter concept. It is the big reason most of my heroes go on adventures -- responsibility to the people and world around them, for they might be the best chance to stave off death and despair in their neck of the woods. Raziya doesn't want anyone else to suffer like she has, and believes she is born to be the heroine she always dreamed of being. Dana hates who she had become, but is willing to live and die by the blaster if it means worse beings than she can never hurt anyone else, ever again.
 
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