What course should I take if I want to become a Game Developer?

Discussion in 'General Discussion' started by panicdev, Jan 27, 2019.

  1. Andar

    Andar Veteran Veteran

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    If you have a solution to the money problem, then my advice is to take your time with this.
    Fame is very important to get to a point where you can live from game development - and fame goes in both directions.

    Your very first project needs to be of at least average quality. No one expects a masterwork from a new developer, but having a bad first project seriously diminishes your chances to ever sell something again for a lot of reasons.
    And playtesting usually takes as long as developing in the first time unless you can get hundreds of playtesters.

    A lot of game developers have driven their players away with abysmal first games, and only very few managed to survive that by proving their second program to be better.
     
    #21
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  2. panicdev

    panicdev Exp Hunter Member

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    I'll keep this in mind. I do intend to take as much time that I can get to learn and to improve (thats why I created this thread in the first place).
     
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  3. ChampX

    ChampX Veteran Veteran

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    In my personal experiences, a lot of game development courses are either theoretical based or project based. What do I mean by this? Theoretical courses don't have you actually doing any actual development but instead just look at games from an analysis view. This can range from things like game vs play to looking at how games affect society, as well as looking at existing games to answer questions like how the first level in Super Mario Bros on NES is designed in a way to teach the player intuitively. Then your project based courses are more hands on by working on an actual project, but no real lectures. This is usually where you would take theoretical concepts you learned and apply them yourselves. You might find courses that offer both (depending on the topic), but courses at college level at least are only a semester long meaning they can only teach and practice so much in short time. If you really are interested in game development, expect to be learning for a really long time, even outside of a school.

    That said, if I were you, I would just start learning skills that help you do the things you want to do in your engine of choice. If you are using RPG Maker MV and are thinking about learning code for things like a battle system, learn JavaScript. If you are using Unity, learn C#. All languages people generally care about have the basic concepts of programming that once you have a grasp for them you can move onto others without much issue (such as if you wanted to jump from MV JavaScript to Unity C# or even Python because you dropped game development and got a career in writing data analysis software). If art is more your thing, learn how to create sprites or tilesets that you can use in MV. Like music? Same idea, learn to create sound you can use in your projects. There are tutorials on these things.

    Once you have a little bit of an idea, should you then in my opinion look at more formal courses that teach things like art, code, and sound. The reason for that is they very rarely focus on games and instead look at things from a general broader sense. These can apply to games, but it will be up to you to figure out the connection and for someone who hasn't even completed a simple project, you may lose motivation as you aren't doing all the fun stuff yet!

    It may also help to watch this video to (and to check out other videos on this channel).

     
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  4. bgillisp

    bgillisp Global Moderators Global Mod

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    Andar has some good points on that. My game has been in progress for...it will be 5 years in June. But some of that is because I'm working too, and some of that is the testing side. My game has been able to be played from start to finish since August of 2016 and has been in Beta form since July 2018, but since it is just me, testing it is taking a LONG time. But at the same time I'm not planning to do game making FT unless something really strange happens like my first game or two is a runaway success or something (and we all know the odds of that happening for a new dev is about as likely as winning the lottery). So just take your time and work on it, and release it when it is ready.
     
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  5. Rixis (릭시스)

    Rixis (릭시스) Mecha Queen Veteran

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    People have said a lot of things here already so I'll keep my opinion fairly brief;

    Just wanted to say, keep in mind one big thing and that is, there really is no ONE way to make it into the industry(or just about any industry for that matter) Everyone here , even the most experienced people are only speaking from their perspective and experience of how they got to where they are, so always consider that.

    You are really young(and thats a good thing) The best thing about that is time is on your side and its even better that you are thinking firmly on what you want to do, this means you have more time to start learning about everything in the field you want to enter.

    Long story short, if I were you, I would just focus on learning and everything you can about game development, focus on things that particularly interest you first so that you can keep up motivation and just slowly push yourself in areas you arent so sure about so you can keep learning something new.

    Over time you will get around people who have similar interest to you(making games), and as someone mentioned earlier this is KEY. Being apart of a community of people like that will get you into the "it's who you know scenario" which is probably one of the biggest keys to breaking into just about any industry. So just focus on gaining skills and making cool stuff and have it be well presentable, and be around like minded people. After while, things will work themselves out.

    Also don't ever be afraid to learn about things OUTSIDE of making games, have all types of skills and knowledge is not just useful for your own well being in case you change your mind about things, but also other knowledge is very much useful to your prowess as a game designer. And I am an advocate for college 4 year degree, as this helps cover you exactly with that and gives you something to lean on as you try to break your way in.

    always stay positive and keep at it, if you really want it! Good luck!
     
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