What do you do when hitting the wall on your solo project?

Luminous

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Hi, it's Luminous here.
It's already a common issue when we are starting a solo project. We will hit a particular wall (at least it happens often on me)
Not like I am losing the passion for continuing my project, but somehow I can't make meaningful progress.
It's not once I failed to deliver the project demo but twice! lol
Meanwhile, a lot of people I know can successfully finish their solo projects.
When I develop a project with a team, everything runs smoothly because I only do what I choose to do, like mapping, debugging, or database, but when I do everything by myself, sometimes I just stare at the monitor without know what to do.

When this time is come what I do usually is rest.
I am helping my friend project or my team.
Continue thinking about why I am so slow on doing my own project.
Maybe all of you experience the same problem as me?
Or someone already knows how to break the wall when you got hit by it.
Feel free to share your opinion here ^^
 

dreamfall887

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I know how you feel. I seriously envy the users here that have made several games by themselves lol. It's not that I'm lazy because when I'm feeling motivated I can get a lot done.
I have a bad habit of getting an idea for a game, start making it, then getting stuck or running out of ideas and abandoning it.
Sometimes taking a break from game-making helps me. It helps me to feel less stressed plus I sometimes get inspired by watching films, reading books, playing games, and listening to music.
I also find it helps when I post my progress on the forum. I'll post screenshots or a video or just write down my ideas and getting feedback helps me stay motivated. It can also help, when I'm stuck or have run out of ideas, to ask for help and advice from the users on the forum. :)
 

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I find this happening rather frequently, and likely due in large part to inexperience, at least where the program itself is concerned. I've found that what can help me is to pour focus into one area, and jump to another when a block occurs. Usually, some ideas for enemies or skills will have come to me as I work on the events and areas, for example, so I can get those out of my system and hopefully get ideas for what I got stuck on in the process.
 
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Totally feel you there!
I've always loved designing my own worlds and making pixel art, but sometimes the coding aspects of RPG Maker just make me too tired.

Usually I'll resort to simply not worrying about it.
I will take a break when I need to, and I'll continue doing whatever I need to do for my game when I feel motivated again. I've found that working bits at a time is usually key, and not working on it for several hours straight.

I try to think of it like this:
Files don't magically disappear. They will always be there waiting for you when you come back. Just don't keep them waiting forever!
 

Arctica

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I wouldn't say I hit a wall..just after 1-2 hours, my mind will drift away from the project and I'll have to put myself back on track. Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays are my project days and that came be about 4-5 hours each.
 

Cythera

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I'll switch to something I enjoy doing in game dev, and try to connect it back to what was stopping me. For example: I detest mapping. Hate it. It's awful.
But! I love anything database-related! Skills, numbers, coding fun passives and clever AI, balancing problems to solve... :kaoluv:
So, I'll design some new enemies, or if I'm feeling particularly cruel, new bosses. Of course, enemies that powerful need homes, right? So I'll design an enemy, map of bit of its home. Balance some numbers, map a little more, maybe add a dungeon or side path. And so on. Eventually, I'm in a good enough mood that I'll be okay to carry on with the torture that is mapping.

My backup plan is chocolate and Ark, and coming back 2 weeks later...
 

ElCheffe

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I think it is only natural and happens to everyone. One reason I sometimes encounter is doing the same task for too long. In this case I usually start to rotate my work, e.g. work on one topic for 15-30 minutes, make a short break, work on another topic followed by a short break and so on.
For me this is really helpful and usually after a while my general motivation comes back.

The other tip I can provide: If you feel like needing a break, just take one. But plan ahead when you want to continue. Take one week off but force yourself to start working on your project again after the week is over.
 

Luminous

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I know how you feel. I seriously envy the users here that have made several games by themselves lol. It's not that I'm lazy because when I'm feeling motivated I can get a lot done.
I have a bad habit of getting an idea for a game, start making it, then getting stuck or running out of ideas and abandoning it.
Sometimes taking a break from game-making helps me. It helps me to feel less stressed plus I sometimes get inspired by watching films, reading books, playing games, and listening to music.
I also find it helps when I post my progress on the forum. I'll post screenshots or a video or just write down my ideas and getting feedback helps me stay motivated. It can also help, when I'm stuck or have run out of ideas, to ask for help and advice from the users on the forum. :)
Oh that's it. To be honest I didn't touch my Netflix for almost two weeks when I started back to make a project. Maybe I need to take a break for a while since I didn't make any worthy progress after all.

I find this happening rather frequently, and likely due in large part to inexperience, at least where the program itself is concerned. I've found that what can help me is to pour focus into one area, and jump to another when a block occurs. Usually, some ideas for enemies or skills will have come to me as I work on the events and areas, for example, so I can get those out of my system and hopefully get ideas for what I got stuck on in the process.
I see, I never use this method I always stuck on one area and try to finish it as soon as possible. Because I always thinking I will do another when I finish mapping first. Gee thanks ^^

Totally feel you there!
I've always loved designing my own worlds and making pixel art, but sometimes the coding aspects of RPG Maker just make me too tired.

Usually I'll resort to simply not worrying about it.
I will take a break when I need to, and I'll continue doing whatever I need to do for my game when I feel motivated again. I've found that working bits at a time is usually key, and not working on it for several hours straight.

I try to think of it like this:
Files don't magically disappear. They will always be there waiting for you when you come back. Just don't keep them waiting forever!
Files don't magically disappear! Hahaha nice quotes Poptart. I see so working bits at a time working for you, I will consider it ^^

I wouldn't say I hit a wall..just after 1-2 hours, my mind will drift away from the project and I'll have to put myself back on track. Tuesdays, Thursdays and Fridays are my project days and that came be about 4-5 hours each.
Wow great, to be honest I never able to reach that amount of playtime. When I create a project I will stuck on 2 hours playtime and start hitting a wall

I'll switch to something I enjoy doing in game dev, and try to connect it back to what was stopping me. For example: I detest mapping. Hate it. It's awful.
But! I love anything database-related! Skills, numbers, coding fun passives and clever AI, balancing problems to solve... :kaoluv:
So, I'll design some new enemies, or if I'm feeling particularly cruel, new bosses. Of course, enemies that powerful need homes, right? So I'll design an enemy, map of bit of its home. Balance some numbers, map a little more, maybe add a dungeon or side path. And so on. Eventually, I'm in a good enough mood that I'll be okay to carry on with the torture that is mapping.

My backup plan is chocolate and Ark, and coming back 2 weeks later...
Mapping is the only I good with. But this part waste me too much time haha. Yeah mapping is hard specially if you want to please people who play it ^^

I think it is only natural and happens to everyone. One reason I sometimes encounter is doing the same task for too long. In this case I usually start to rotate my work, e.g. work on one topic for 15-30 minutes, make a short break, work on another topic followed by a short break and so on.
For me this is really helpful and usually after a while my general motivation comes back.

The other tip I can provide: If you feel like needing a break, just take one. But plan ahead when you want to continue. Take one week off but force yourself to start working on your project again after the week is over.
Wow I am surprised so many people doing switch task to break their blocking path. So maybe if I do a rotation on work it will help me solving this annoying problem haha.


Thank you everyone, I am glad so many people can relate to this trouble.
I guess it help me with the idea of taking break and do a rotation on my task
Now I am focused on finishing my map but if I stuck I will choose to work on my dialogue or polishing my story ^^
 

Arctica

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For tough problems: I find that if no solution is found for one day, it's best to come back to later. Usually 'background brainstorming' will solve it on another day. By background brainstorming, I mean when you're doing other stuff but you're still figuring out ways to solve the problem in your project LOL.
 

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get really high and just brainstorm and bounce ideas off my brother and best friend who are also RPG focused gamers while taking notes. and then next day when the buzz is gone try to remember where the notes ended up.
or just take a break and play some games/watch anime without thinking about it and random solutions just pop up because your no longer trying think of solutions at that time.
 
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cthulhusquid

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I typically work on my games during the weekend, as I am usually too demotivated after work. If I am stuck in a tough spot, I move on to another of my projects (I am solo developing 3 games currently), or leave things be if I'm stuck on those. I do a lot of my brainstorming at work, so I at least try to solve creative issues there.
I pretty much always listen to music while working on my games, usually a genre that fits with the game's general aesthetic.
 

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Yeah, this is probably common for a lot of game makers. I know when I feel "stuck", is when I'm not really experienced in a particular area [like coding]. I tend to move on to another area, [like character drafting] and work on that until my motivation changes. One of my biggest issues is that I try to make a fully complex and overtly complicated code instead of starting out with a workable and tangible code that at least functions at the end of the day [scale down]. Getting feedback from peers about their thoughts on a "workable model" before making the more elaborate and complicated decisions can be very useful. You can at least show your team that you have made a workable model instead of having days and days where they don't have a real clue about the state of the project.
 
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Tai_MT

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The issue is likely within the reason you're making a game to begin with.

People "only do the parts they like" because they aren't playing with RPG Maker to make a game. They're playing with RPG Maker to just do the small pieces of things they like and nothing more. There is nothing wrong with this (after all, most of these types of people get groups together to cover weaknesses as a result).

But, the fact remains that you're not really making a game to make a game. You're making a game to do the few things you like to do and nothing more. You're using the program "like a toy" for "fun" rather than "for work". That's not to say there's anything wrong with doing so... But, it's the reason most people fail to complete a game on their own. They're looking for FUN from the program. They're not looking to COMPLETE A PASSION PROJECT.

1. It would be "fun" to have a game on the market!
2. Designing sprites are so much fun!
3. Composing music is so much fun!
4. Writing stories is amazing!
5. Coming up with characters is what I love to do!
6. I love creating plugins!
7. Artwork is my passion!

The list goes on and on. People who pick up a game maker because they want to do that one thing of game design they enjoy doing and not much else. Sure, they want to "complete a game", but only because they think "it would be cool to have a game I created". Another form of "fun".

If you're serious about completing a game, you need to treat it less like "something I do for fun" and treat it more like, "Something I do for a job." That is, less improv work... more scheduled time with no distractions to complete portions of your game.

When I look at designing my game, I tend to turn it into this. There are parts I want to do to have fun. But, I tend to save those "for last" because getting through "the work" is going to be the most draining part. I spent several months putting together animations that I still don't like and still look like garbage... but they work. I scheduled doing 10 a day for a while.

Now, the other issue a lot of people run into with "making a game" is that most of us aren't equipped to design a game all on our own. The skillset required to write story, write dialogue, script events, create compelling systems, create compelling combat, balancing stats, creating and implementing musical scores, map design aesthetics... etcetera... There's a lot of skillsets in there. Creatives tend to "burn out" when they create things "not as good as they imagine". So, an artist who can't write dialogue for crap inevitably burns out once it's time to actually create the characters themselves.

But, if it's your first game and your goal is to "produce a game", then you just sit down and do it. It's going to be garbage. No matter what, it is. Your first game is always garbage. The important bit is just to finish one, if that's what you want to do. Finish your first game, and learn from the experience so you are better at your next attempt.

You need to change your goal with RPG Maker from "have fun designing a game" into "actually create a game" if you want to finish one. If you're using the program just for fun... game design really isn't for you and you'll never make one... and it'll always just be something you lightly dabble in so you can get your fix of your ACTUAL passion.
 
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The issue is likely within the reason you're making a game to begin with.

People "only do the parts they like" because they aren't playing with RPG Maker to make a game. They're playing with RPG Maker to just do the small pieces of things they like and nothing more. There is nothing wrong with this (after all, most of these types of people get groups together to cover weaknesses as a result).

But, the fact remains that you're not really making a game to make a game. You're making a game to do the few things you like to do and nothing more. You're using the program "like a toy" for "fun" rather than "for work". That's not to say there's anything wrong with doing so... But, it's the reason most people fail to complete a game on their own. They're looking for FUN from the program. They're not looking to COMPLETE A PASSION PROJECT.

1. It would be "fun" to have a game on the market!
2. Designing sprites are so much fun!
3. Composing music is so much fun!
4. Writing stories is amazing!
5. Coming up with characters is what I love to do!
6. I love creating plugins!
7. Artwork is my passion!

The list goes on and on. People who pick up a game maker because they want to do that one thing of game design they enjoy doing and not much else. Sure, they want to "complete a game", but only because they think "it would be cool to have a game I created". Another form of "fun".

If you're serious about completing a game, you need to treat it less like "something I do for fun" and treat it more like, "Something I do for a job." That is, less improv work... more scheduled time with no distractions to complete portions of your game.

When I look at designing my game, I tend to turn it into this. There are parts I want to do to have fun. But, I tend to save those "for last" because getting through "the work" is going to be the most draining part. I spent several months putting together animations that I still don't like and still look like garbage... but they work. I scheduled doing 10 a day for a while.

Now, the other issue a lot of people run into with "making a game" is that most of us aren't equipped to design a game all on our own. The skillset required to write story, write dialogue, script events, create compelling systems, create compelling combat, balancing stats, creating and implementing musical scores, map design aesthetics... etcetera... There's a lot of skillsets in there. Creatives tend to "burn out" when they create things "not as good as they imagine". So, an artist who can't write dialogue for crap inevitably burns out once it's time to actually create the characters themselves.

But, if it's your first game and your goal is to "produce a game", then you just sit down and do it. It's going to be garbage. No matter what, it is. Your first game is always garbage. The important bit is just to finish one, if that's what you want to do. Finish your first game, and learn from the experience so you are better at your next attempt.

You need to change your goal with RPG Maker from "have fun designing a game" into "actually create a game" if you want to finish one. If you're using the program just for fun... game design really isn't for you and you'll never make one... and it'll always just be something you lightly dabble in so you can get your fix of your ACTUAL passion.

I really hate admitting this, but this is true....to an extent.
Most people look forward to a certain part of game creation when the creation of a full game requires a lot more than at first glance.

That's why it's so important to do what you said...have your very first goal in game creation...to complete one at all. (Even if it is bad)


With that in mind, it's so important to do your best and never let the project slip away. If you can't do it, then you can't do it, sure. But make that 1st goal to...complete the game. You will surely strive miles from that point if you ever decide to come back for another creation!
 

KazukiT

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I have the opposite problem where I am content working on my own but struggle to work in a group. I have this thought I would hamper the project's lead's idea or maybe I might be overbearing. Although I have helped someone with their game before and neither of those things happened. (I think I am just self-conscious about working with others because I rarely socialize in real life.)

Also taking breaks can also help, even if this is something I struggle with it myself.
 

Luminous

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get really high and just brainstorm and bounce ideas off my brother and best friend who are also RPG focused gamers while taking notes. and then next day when the buzz is gone try to remember where the notes ended up.
or just take a break and play some games/watch anime without thinking about it and random solutions just pop up because your no longer trying think of solutions at that time.
I am actually couldn't do this yesterday. When I logged in to my Netflix, I suddenly felt so guilty because I abandoned my project XD. I change my workflow, and I guess that works fine on me at least this week ^^


I typically work on my games during the weekend, as I am usually too demotivated after work. If I am stuck in a tough spot, I move on to another of my projects (I am solo developing 3 games currently), or leave things be if I'm stuck on those. I do a lot of my brainstorming at work, so I at least try to solve creative issues there.
I pretty much always listen to music while working on my games, usually a genre that fits with the game's general aesthetic.
What kind of music do you listening to? Honestly, I am out of stock song list, so I decide to hear Vtuber when I start working, haha.

Yeah, this is probably common for a lot of game makers. I know when I feel "stuck", is when I'm not really experienced in a particular area [like coding]. I tend to move on to another area, [like character drafting] and work on that until my motivation changes. One of my biggest issues is that I try to make a fully complex and overtly complicated code instead of starting out with a workable and tangible code that at least functions at the end of the day [scale down]. Getting feedback from peers about their thoughts on a "workable model" before making the more elaborate and complicated decisions can be very useful. You can at least show your team that you have made a workable model instead of having days and days where they don't have a real clue about the state of the project.
Yes, that's it! Now I am still working on a new working model or workflow. In the creative industry, we really really need to refresh and change the atmosphere to always maintain the mood.

The issue is likely within the reason you're making a game to begin with.

People "only do the parts they like" because they aren't playing with RPG Maker to make a game. They're playing with RPG Maker to just do the small pieces of things they like and nothing more. There is nothing wrong with this (after all, most of these types of people get groups together to cover weaknesses as a result).

But, the fact remains that you're not really making a game to make a game. You're making a game to do the few things you like to do and nothing more. You're using the program "like a toy" for "fun" rather than "for work". That's not to say there's anything wrong with doing so... But, it's the reason most people fail to complete a game on their own. They're looking for FUN from the program. They're not looking to COMPLETE A PASSION PROJECT.

1. It would be "fun" to have a game on the market!
2. Designing sprites are so much fun!
3. Composing music is so much fun!
4. Writing stories is amazing!
5. Coming up with characters is what I love to do!
6. I love creating plugins!
7. Artwork is my passion!

The list goes on and on. People who pick up a game maker because they want to do that one thing of game design they enjoy doing and not much else. Sure, they want to "complete a game", but only because they think "it would be cool to have a game I created". Another form of "fun".

If you're serious about completing a game, you need to treat it less like "something I do for fun" and treat it more like, "Something I do for a job." That is, less improv work... more scheduled time with no distractions to complete portions of your game.

When I look at designing my game, I tend to turn it into this. There are parts I want to do to have fun. But, I tend to save those "for last" because getting through "the work" is going to be the most draining part. I spent several months putting together animations that I still don't like and still look like garbage... but they work. I scheduled doing 10 a day for a while.

Now, the other issue a lot of people run into with "making a game" is that most of us aren't equipped to design a game all on our own. The skillset required to write story, write dialogue, script events, create compelling systems, create compelling combat, balancing stats, creating and implementing musical scores, map design aesthetics... etcetera... There's a lot of skillsets in there. Creatives tend to "burn out" when they create things "not as good as they imagine". So, an artist who can't write dialogue for crap inevitably burns out once it's time to actually create the characters themselves.

But, if it's your first game and your goal is to "produce a game", then you just sit down and do it. It's going to be garbage. No matter what, it is. Your first game is always garbage. The important bit is just to finish one, if that's what you want to do. Finish your first game, and learn from the experience so you are better at your next attempt.

You need to change your goal with RPG Maker from "have fun designing a game" into "actually create a game" if you want to finish one. If you're using the program just for fun... game design really isn't for you and you'll never make one... and it'll always just be something you lightly dabble in so you can get your fix of your ACTUAL passion.
Yeah, this is completely right
The second problem is I always feel exhausted after 6 PM because of my daily routine work. I am a full-time worker in a company and doing game development from 6 PM to 11 PM.
I already fighting these barriers since 2019 to how I maintain my fitness by doing a workout.

Thanks to people who suggest here, I see enlightenment about maintaining your mood and keeping your passion on fire.

Someday I will get burned out again. Yeah, I know, but when that time arrives, I will make sure I prepare for everything.

Thanks for your hot take ^^
 

redcachalot

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Well, in order to remotivate myself, I personally watch the old extra credits game design videos on YouTube to get myself 'back into the zone.'
Unfortunately, I quickly get lost on YouTube for hours soon afterwards...

 

Kayoz

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When thinking about the life cycle of a project, there are various approaches that can be used to tackle any given stage to reach the overall goal. I'm learning that often a"grit" approach, [one that powers through with commitment and courage] is very useful indeed. There may be an allotted time for a project to be completed where workloads oscillate between light and heavy intensities. Usually, the work performed is based on an individual or small team who is tasked with completing things on schedule [unless time demands are not as crucial as other project values.] This approach is pretty typical, pushing through difficult periods of the project. I think that for individuals who work on these projects, we like to think that we can be really good at all the various areas of the game. But realistically, someone on the team may be really good at story craft. while another is good at character design, and yet another at quality assurance. It would be extremely rare to find a single individual who would be 5 stars in all these various departments. I think sometimes our goals or vision can be unhinged from the actual "on-the-ground" realities of completing that task. Sometimes reassessing our goal, asking for help, or delegating a task to another member of the team may be a way forward.

Another approach to the "grit and get things done model " [which is often dependant on a single individual] is a team-based solution model that limits the workload for the entire team [less intense workload] during a specific time or crucial stages of the project and focuses the entire team on overcoming a single problem. This concentration of the entire team on a single problem can help fill in the experience gaps that all individuals will inevitably encounter. It can also be extremely helpful to pair senior staff with the less experienced because the dynamic between team members may help build skills [or at least some working understanding] of the specific area in question.
 
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LeeThom91

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I typically play games when I'm finding it hard to get motivated - particularly other RPG Maker games, try out some free demos and pay attention to the little details. Think 'I wonder how they've done that?' and try and recreate it in my own way.
Alternatively I'll just jump ahead to something I enjoy doing on my game - like I love mapping. It doesn't even have to be a map I'll end up using, sometimes if I'm really struggling to create a map I'll just try recreating a map from a popular game with the tiles I have to get the creative juices flowing - or map out my house, or where I work, or anywhere I know well - it forces me to use creative mapping techniques that I can then apply to the areas of my game.
But most importantly of all, take breaks, don't burn yourself out, enjoy it!
 

KazukiT

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I typically play games when I'm finding it hard to get motivated - particularly other RPG Maker games, try out some free demos and pay attention to the little details. Think 'I wonder how they've done that?' and try and recreate it in my own way.
Alternatively I'll just jump ahead to something I enjoy doing on my game - like I love mapping. It doesn't even have to be a map I'll end up using, sometimes if I'm really struggling to create a map I'll just try recreating a map from a popular game with the tiles I have to get the creative juices flowing - or map out my house, or where I work, or anywhere I know well - it forces me to use creative mapping techniques that I can then apply to the areas of my game.
But most importantly of all, take breaks, don't burn yourself out, enjoy it!
Mapping is also one of my favorite things to do next to Eventing in RPG Maker. Although mapping in my next game is a little different where it looks like a dollhouse of sorts. (I was trying to make the map 2d, where you only move left and right) I am fine with this because it gives it its own style.
 

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