What do you study in high school/college?

Discussion in 'General Lounge' started by gomes766, Nov 1, 2018.

  1. gomes766

    gomes766 Villager Member

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    I'm going in to college in a few weeks and I'm terrified. I've heard some pretty scary things about how hard college is and how much studying needs to be done. I did almost no studying in high school but I got still managed to get good grades. Thing is I'm pretty sure this isn't gonna work in college. Am I supposed to dedicate 3 hours every day to just rereading my notes over and over or is there something I'm supposed to do to actually study?
     
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  2. RetroExcellent

    RetroExcellent Pixelated Avatar of Chaos Veteran

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    Honestly, depends on the class and your professors. I had several classes that were pretty basic, not much different than high school. This will likely be pretty true for your first year. As you get into more advanced classes, you will have to put in more advanced effort.
     
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  3. Wavelength

    Wavelength Pre-Merge Boot Veteran

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    It's different for everyone, and it's somewhat different across various colleges and majors, as well. Personally, I had to work my ass off to get A's and B's in high school, but easily got straight A's in college with only moderate effort. But I know most people don't have that same experience.

    One difference between high school and college can be that high school is more about memorizing facts whereas mid-to-upper-level college courses (especially in the sciences) tend to be more about understanding systems of ideas. When this is the paradigm, you can spend less time re-reading your notes, but good practice includes explaining (to other people), or applying (to a project or hobby), the concepts you learned. Make sure that you understand why any given fact that you learn is true, and team up with friends and classmates to discuss what you've learned and correct each others' misunderstandings (but DO NOT CHEAT).

    One other difference is that there will be a lot of reading outside of class (in some classes). This was never really my style and I sort of brute-force memorized what I could from the textbooks, but any techniques you can find to help raise your retention of what you read will be very helpful. For classes where remembering facts rather than systems is important, I recommend reading the textbook chapters slowly throughout the weeks, and then reading them a second time in the few days leading up to the exam.

    A few other pieces of advice for you as you go off to college:
    • You now have a lot more freedom to choose which classes you take. Take advantage of this - choose classes you are truly interested in, rather than ones that seem easy. I sincerely found that genuine interest - the desire to learn something rather than to just get the grade - was actually the best tool I had in keeping my grades high.
    • You also have a lot more freedom to choose how you live, if you're not living at home. Make smart choices. Make good use of your time, stay the hell away from hard drugs, know your limits with alcohol, trust your instincts, and don't give into peer pressure. Failing that will tank your grades even if you're book-smart. But as long as you're staying away from bad choices, don't forget to have fun. Explore new friends, new places, and new lifestyles. Get out, get involved, and get excited. College away from home is a safer, freer version of adulthood.
    • If you do find yourself struggling in a particular class for whatever reason, talk to the class' TAs (Teachers' Aides) if the class has them, or talk to your Professor otherwise during their office hours. They all have office hours, and most genuinely want to help you succeed. Often they will keep working with you until you understand the course material well.
    • During exams, and during the lead-up to exams, RELAX. Stressing out makes it super-hard to learn and remember stuff. Stressing out is why people 'choke' during exams. You are a smart, motivated person, so stay confident that you can do it, and don't even let your mind wander to what happens if you can't (which isn't as bad as you'd fear, anyway). Be diligent about studying, but give yourself short breaks and little luxuries to keep your mental state sharp, and make yourself really comfortable.
     
    Last edited: Nov 1, 2018
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  4. MushroomCake28

    MushroomCake28 Great Sorcerer Ainz Ooal Gown-sama Veteran

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    Well depends on what you're studying. Don't expect to have straight As by doing nothing though, especially in programs like health sciences, engineering, law, etc.

    I study law in college, and you need to work to get good grades. Although it isn't as bad as people say (you don't need to only study during your college years), you still need to put some effort to have good grades. I would say 3 hours a day is pretty reasonable, but expect to be in survival mode when the exams period arrive.
     
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  5. megumi014

    megumi014 Veteran Veteran

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    THIS

    That is the best advice you can get.

    From a personal experience (and some other friends had the same experience too) college is more about changing your mindset regarding what do you expect from your studies. I guess it depends on the country and the major, but in high school is more like "study to pass an exam", while in college that applies too, but is more like "study to use this knowledge later on". Some subjects might share the same basic fundaments, and will probably use them again on second year and so on, so even if you feel stressed on your first year RELAX, college is more about continuity, so even if you don't get good grades on some exam or you struggle at first with the volume of work it will get more stable on second year.

    (I changed twice of major so yeah... xD I don't advice you to do that lol, but that first to second year slow down volume of work happened on the 3 majors xD)
     
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  6. OmnislashXX

    OmnislashXX Veteran Veteran

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    Learn the art of getting drunk at wild frat parties, streaking across the quad and waking up next to the foreign exchange student.
     
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  7. TheoAllen

    TheoAllen Self-proclaimed jack of all trades Veteran

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    Choosing programs will be one of the important aspect. If you choose to study something you don't particularly like but you choose it anyway bcz it's popular, you will be spending your college years on stress. Choose something you like. I've heard enough some people pick a wrong program for them and ended up wasted their time on college.

    Also for taking notes, it depends on individual experience, your study program, and many things. I study on Information Engineering. And whenever it's a class about coding, I barely take notes and still managed to get A. But for something that's rely more on remembering than logic, I need notes.
     
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  8. Rukiri

    Rukiri I like to make Action-RPGs Veteran

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    Calculus, Physics, and Chemistry if you're not an idiot.
    In College it's up to you, the hand holding is over, unless you're a liberal than it's never over...
    For math, stop at Calculus 2 unless you plan on being an engineer, I stopped at 4 because me and my cousin wanted to see how far we could go in math well... he beat me in Calculus IV as I got a C and he got an A. The fact I got a C in Calculus IV was already an accomplishment, that course was fricking brutal!!!!!!!!!

    How to mess up your life in 4 years!
     
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  9. joombo

    joombo Veteran Veteran

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    Mechanical Engineering. Hope I'll get master's degree in two years. Right now I combine work and study and often apply to writing service to write my paper for me. It saves my time. My "dream job" is to be the CEO and Lead Engineer. I am particularly interested in search and rescue, public security/safety.
     
    Last edited: Nov 1, 2018
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