What makes a good store page?

MechScapeZH

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If you have any questions hmu! I'm an experienced video and film editor
Thank you so much! Well, question one: where on Earth do I start? :guffaw: The extent of my knowledge is Windows Movie Maker- that's the reason I was reluctant to make one before. If I knew what I was doing, I'd have made a trailer in addition to the demo right as my game was released, but unfortunately I have no skill whatsoever in this area. I have an idea of what I'd show in a trailer, but no idea what software I'd have to use to create one.

You're competing with many store pages. Having a trailer means that your potential player can watch it in a mere few minutes to get most of your game content than trying the game that they probably need to get in more than 10 minutes to see your overall game and they may be stingy to spend their time for your game, not to mention if your game demo is big. In other words, trailers are more reachable.
That makes a lot of sense- thank you1
 

a_a

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Thank you so much! Well, question one: where on Earth do I start? :guffaw: The extent of my knowledge is Windows Movie Maker- that's the reason I was reluctant to make one before. If I knew what I was doing, I'd have made a trailer in addition to the demo right as my game was released, but unfortunately I have no skill whatsoever in this area. I have an idea of what I'd show in a trailer, but no idea what software I'd have to use to create one.



That makes a lot of sense- thank you1
I use final cut pro x, and and array of plugins. If you want to use that, you'll need a mac and hundreds of dollars. Since I mainly use a mac for editing all I can recommend for free is Imovie, I don't know much about windows other than I beta tested vegas pro or whatsamacallit. If you want I can edit a trailer for you for free, hmu in my dms and we can talk about it.
 

MechScapeZH

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I use final cut pro x, and and array of plugins. If you want to use that, you'll need a mac and hundreds of dollars. Since I mainly use a mac for editing all I can recommend for free is Imovie, I don't know much about windows other than I beta tested vegas pro or whatsamacallit. If you want I can edit a trailer for you for free, hmu in my dms and we can talk about it.
For free? Oh, no- I couldn't ask that of you. You deserve to be paid for your skills.

Thank you for the information, though!
 

a_a

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Your good buddy I like contributing. Just hmu anytime, my pay will be a short 2 second credit at the end of the trailer.
If you have any other editing questions hmu tho!
 

Tai_MT

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If you have a demo, I much prefer to see the Trailer first. The demo would be the last thing I'd do just before a buy. A demo tends to be the "make or break" point of the sale for me. If you have a demo, then I will usually use it as a "last resort" to see if your gameplay is actually fun. However, getting me to play the demo is going to be the same uphill climb as getting me to actually pay for your game. All the other criteria apply.

Trailers do help quite a lot. Though, if you don't have a trailer, I will settle for screenshots and a detailed page on what the game is like (especially if the details/summary of the game has screenshots to show what you're talking about).
 

Zreine

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I usually don't even bother with demos. Depending on the size they take time to download and install, and if I don't like it I have to uninstall everything. In all the years I've been on steam I've never tried a single demo first. I either buy the game or don't.

Usually I check the screenshots first, read the description of the game and the tags. Then go back to the screenshots. If I'm not sure yet, I watch the trailer to get a better idea of what the game looks like. If everything seems interesting to me, then I go read the negative reviews or review that put both pros and cons. What I am looking for in those reviews is:
-Is there any game breaking bugs
-Is the developer active and working on those bugs
-Is there any game mechanics that would be a deal breaker for me

Sometimes, if I'm really interested, but still unsure, I'll go on Youtube to see if I can find a let's play video of the game.
 

EthanFox

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7. Price point. The final thing I look at is how much you're charging me. I have an internal value of money I'm willing to pay for a specific experience. If you have overpriced that perceived experience... I'm probably not going to buy your game. I probably won't even put it on my Wishlist. Now, if your price is reasonable, but I don't have the money, it goes on my Wishlist. For example, I would not pay $60 for Stardew Valley. I would not pay much more than $20 for an RPG Maker game. No, I don't care if everything in it is 3000000000% custom everything. Just... no. Not unless you managed to completely rework the entire engine so that it does something I know the engine cannot do easily... I'm not gonna pay more than $20 for your RPG Maker game. I'm just not. I don't care what plugins you have.
While I agree that pricing is a very important aspect of selling a game, I'd just say here for the OP's benefit that pricing is really subjective. There are definitely people (even among those on this forum) who would never pay a full price for an RPG Maker game; hell there are people here who in prior threads who have said that would never pay any amount, not even a penny, for an RPG Maker game. Conversely, there are probably people here who have paid a lot, or regularly buy expensive games. Then, of course, money means different things to different people; £40 is a not-trivial amount of money for me, but pocket change to an oil baron.

However, there's another factor for this, which is price scaling.

Let's say you're a jeweller and you make silver engraved rings. The components and the labour mean that to break even, you have to sell each ring for 10$. You can't go below that or you're losing money. However, obviously, you can charge any amount more than 10$ that you want, in theory... As long as it's an amount that someone will pay, as if no-one buys one, you're still losing money.

Now, you could sell the rings for 11$, and you'll make $1 every sale. At such a cheap price, you might sell quite a few rings.

However, you could just make 1 ring, and sell it for 1000$. This means that for the 1 sale, you make 990$. For the sake of argument, pretend that you're a master engraver and someone would genuinely buy a ring for this price.

This is where price scaling comes in. If you sell the rings for 11$, are you going to sell 990 rings? Maybe? Maybe not. So, should you sell them for 1000$?

Now, this comes back to something I've said about game development a few times here, and that's "start with why". Why are you developing the game? Is it to make money? Or do you want people to play it? If the jeweler in our above wants to maximise revenue, 1000$ rings might be a good idea, but you might only sell a couple. Our jeweler might, actually, want lots of people to own their rings; so that jeweler probably sells them for 30$.

My game is chapter-based. The first chapter is totally free, and the second chapter is $2.99, and they'll probably continue around that mark. That's because, primarily, I want people to play them. The revenue is just to pay off the cost of the custom artwork I have to commission for each chapter (though I haven't got there yet).

Anyway, the thing to take away from this is that (1) money means different things to different users and (2) you should consider your costs and your development goals as part of your pricing strategy.

If you have a demo, I much prefer to see the Trailer first. The demo would be the last thing I'd do just before a buy. A demo tends to be the "make or break" point of the sale for me.
Agreed. I think demos are overrated these days, in the years when we have stuff like YouTube. It's just so easy to watch 30 seconds of footage to get an idea of how a game plays, vs. a much longer time investment for a demo.

The only platform where I still use demos, today, is VR - because often with VR games, you struggle to get a good grasp on how they play from a video, and it can be quicker just to download a demo.
 

jkweath

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@MechScapeZH for trailer creation, I've always personally used Windows Movie Maker and recorded game footage with OBS. It doesn't take too long to set things up that way. Obviously there are much better movie editing programs out there, but I've found that they either a) are extremely complicated for what I need and would take weeks to learn, b) have an exorbitant price point, or c) might be "just right" but hide key features behind a paywall, which to me is just scammy so I don't use them.
 

MechScapeZH

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If you have a demo, I much prefer to see the Trailer first. The demo would be the last thing I'd do just before a buy. A demo tends to be the "make or break" point of the sale for me. If you have a demo, then I will usually use it as a "last resort" to see if your gameplay is actually fun. However, getting me to play the demo is going to be the same uphill climb as getting me to actually pay for your game. All the other criteria apply.

Trailers do help quite a lot. Though, if you don't have a trailer, I will settle for screenshots and a detailed page on what the game is like (especially if the details/summary of the game has screenshots to show what you're talking about).
I see. Thank you for your input!
I usually don't even bother with demos. Depending on the size they take time to download and install, and if I don't like it I have to uninstall everything. In all the years I've been on steam I've never tried a single demo first. I either buy the game or don't.

Usually I check the screenshots first, read the description of the game and the tags. Then go back to the screenshots. If I'm not sure yet, I watch the trailer to get a better idea of what the game looks like. If everything seems interesting to me, then I go read the negative reviews or review that put both pros and cons. What I am looking for in those reviews is:
-Is there any game breaking bugs
-Is the developer active and working on those bugs
-Is there any game mechanics that would be a deal breaker for me

Sometimes, if I'm really interested, but still unsure, I'll go on Youtube to see if I can find a let's play video of the game.
So it'd be to my benefit to accumulate reviews, then. Thank you!
While I agree that pricing is a very important aspect of selling a game, I'd just say here for the OP's benefit that pricing is really subjective. There are definitely people (even among those on this forum) who would never pay a full price for an RPG Maker game; hell there are people here who in prior threads who have said that would never pay any amount, not even a penny, for an RPG Maker game. Conversely, there are probably people here who have paid a lot, or regularly buy expensive games. Then, of course, money means different things to different people; £40 is a not-trivial amount of money for me, but pocket change to an oil baron.

However, there's another factor for this, which is price scaling.

Let's say you're a jeweller and you make silver engraved rings. The components and the labour mean that to break even, you have to sell each ring for 10$. You can't go below that or you're losing money. However, obviously, you can charge any amount more than 10$ that you want, in theory... As long as it's an amount that someone will pay, as if no-one buys one, you're still losing money.

Now, you could sell the rings for 11$, and you'll make $1 every sale. At such a cheap price, you might sell quite a few rings.

However, you could just make 1 ring, and sell it for 1000$. This means that for the 1 sale, you make 990$. For the sake of argument, pretend that you're a master engraver and someone would genuinely buy a ring for this price.

This is where price scaling comes in. If you sell the rings for 11$, are you going to sell 990 rings? Maybe? Maybe not. So, should you sell them for 1000$?

Now, this comes back to something I've said about game development a few times here, and that's "start with why". Why are you developing the game? Is it to make money? Or do you want people to play it? If the jeweler in our above wants to maximise revenue, 1000$ rings might be a good idea, but you might only sell a couple. Our jeweler might, actually, want lots of people to own their rings; so that jeweler probably sells them for 30$.

My game is chapter-based. The first chapter is totally free, and the second chapter is $2.99, and they'll probably continue around that mark. That's because, primarily, I want people to play them. The revenue is just to pay off the cost of the custom artwork I have to commission for each chapter (though I haven't got there yet).

Anyway, the thing to take away from this is that (1) money means different things to different users and (2) you should consider your costs and your development goals as part of your pricing strategy.



Agreed. I think demos are overrated these days, in the years when we have stuff like YouTube. It's just so easy to watch 30 seconds of footage to get an idea of how a game plays, vs. a much longer time investment for a demo.

The only platform where I still use demos, today, is VR - because often with VR games, you struggle to get a good grasp on how they play from a video, and it can be quicker just to download a demo.
You're definitely right regarding price scaling- that was something I thought about a lot when pricing my game. I came to the same conclusion as you- price cheaper so more people play. Thank you!
@MechScapeZH for trailer creation, I've always personally used Windows Movie Maker and recorded game footage with OBS. It doesn't take too long to set things up that way. Obviously there are much better movie editing programs out there, but I've found that they either a) are extremely complicated for what I need and would take weeks to learn, b) have an exorbitant price point, or c) might be "just right" but hide key features behind a paywall, which to me is just scammy so I don't use them.
Oh, really? I thought I needed a visually impressive trailer (with all the words flying in & character art on top of videos like the big game studios have) to get attention, but if you use Movie Maker I'll certainly do so as well. You're very right about the other movie editing programs- I haven't yet found a free/cheap one I understand or trust.

Thank you all for your input!
 

Tai_MT

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@EthanFox

The problem I have with your talk about money is that... it sort of ignores reality to an extent. Value is subjective and not absolute, sure, but your consumers are the ones who determine the value of the product, not the person setting the price.

Money is worth only what we all agree it is worth. While $40 might not be much to a rich person, that rich person is the minority of any sales. They are 1 in a bucket of five-hundred-million. You price things to what the majority thinks they are worth.

For example, as a consumer, you price the cost of something as "similar" to what other vendors are charging for that service/good. You've seen shampoo priced at $2 a bottle all your life, so it's weird to see someone charging $5 a bottle of shampoo. That strange price is probably why you won't buy that product. It's still pretty cheap, but it doesn't match what we've agreed that product should cost. Likewise, in a world where an Oil Change for your car costs around $20 to $30, you would not go to a place that charges $100 for an Oil Change. This is not the price we've all agreed it is worth.

Price is often determined by the supply and the demand of the product. This is often said quite a lot, but few people ever understand what it means. If a product is so rare that there is no competition for it, and is in such high demand, you charge whatever you like for it (this is often called a Monopoly, and is quite illegal, despite the fact that there are several thousand of them in most countries that outlaw them). If you are the only business within 100 miles that does Oil Changes, you can charge $100 if you want and get away with it. The price of convenience. People will pay it because they have no other option.

In a world with ten thousand RPG Maker games, and thirty million or more actual video games to choose from... You don't really get to choose what the price point of your own game is, beyond what people expect it to cost. Good luck selling a copy of "My RPG Maker Game" for more than $30 at most. Often, you'd need luck to sell it at all. Especially when there are other options at similar price points that are just done better than you could ever do with RPG Maker. Not to mention, the stigma already attached to RPG Maker games in general.

You know what the most common price I see RPG Maker games sold at? At about $5-$14. Seems reasonable to me. I'm certainly not going to pay $24 for an RPG Maker game. Not when I can get a $25 game, even an RPG, that is fairly certain to blow it out of the water in terms of gameplay, story, and even graphics.

With a video game, your price point denotes the "quality" of that game. This is why prices of video games don't go above $60. Because, if you're charging more than $60, you're seen as doing something absolutely crazy. There's a reason people say, "the game isn't worth $60". We've all agreed on what these prices mean. What each price range of a game means. How much quality we expect from the price range has all been agreed upon.

As for the jeweler and needing to charge for their work...

I've run into this quite a lot. I tend to find it quite hilarious. It's the reason I make such an amazing merchant in video games. It's the reason players have created "Merchant Guilds" just to fight my business practices. Because, quite frankly, those other players simply have no grasp on economics or business practices.

The easiest example of what I do comes from playing Minecraft on a server. We had a mod installed on the server that gave players anywhere from $0.05 to $0.45 every monster kill (depending on difficulty of monster, with creepers being worth the most... unless you were farming in The Nether, which nobody ever did). Chump change. It was difficult to obtain money on the server. We also had the ability to open shops and maintain them. Each "shop chest" you set up cost an investment of $25. This meant you had to be somewhat established on the server to even put up items for sale.

So, I killed a bunch of mobs over the course of a month to get my first shop chest. Now, I didn't have the necessary funds to "have my own building" (we had plots you could purchase in a central market district), but all I needed was to be able to put up the shop someplace most people would go. I put it fairly close to the spawn area, basically in the "forest". All newbie players would see it as they would go to get wood first. Minecraft is designed in such a way that you can do nothing without wood, including get started in the game.

Oh, each player started the game with $3 as well. I should've probably mentioned that.

So, I have a shop, set up in the nearby woods next to spawn, easy to spot. What was I selling? Wood. Cheap. Very cheap. Not the "Planks" either. No, the logs. Each "log" could be turned into 4 plank blocks. Each plank block could be turned into 2 sticks, each tool used at least two sticks. It takes 4 blank blocks to build a crafting table that allows you access to everything else in the game. A "Stack" in the game was 64 of an object.

I sold 4 stacks of logs for $0.15. For the price of $0.15, you could make 256 crafting tables. You could build things with over 1,000 blocks.

I was undercutting everyone on the server. By a lot. Most places were selling a single stack of logs for about $0.25.

But, I had something most other players did not. I was dedicated to selling things on the server. For profit.

I had a tree farm that was 30 trees by 50 trees. 1500 total trees at any given time. Each tree contained 4-6 logs (depending on how it grew). If I cut them all down and got 5 logs on average, I was looking at 7,500 logs every hour or two in the game (unless I had a lot of bonemeal, which I generally did not, as you obtained it from killing skeletons, and I did not do much combat). A single harvest could supply the server the wood for a very long time. If my shop ever "ran dry" of stock, I simply made an emergency harvest and shoved it all into the shop as quickly as I could manage. Players would often let me know my shop was empty before even cutting down the trees next to it.

Oh, and the trees they cut down near my shop? I replanted those as well.

Now, the downside to my shop was that I was selling only a single kind of log. The easiest log to harvest. If you wanted any color log other than the one I was selling, you had to harvest it yourself. I kept the other two variations of tree growing near my shop, while I sold the third in the chest.

This was a significant time investment for me. Very significant. I was spending about 6 hours a day on the server doing this. Yet, I was only charging $0.15 for 4 stacks of wood. However, every stack I sold was pure profit. It cost me nothing to plant the trees. Cost me nothing to harvest the trees. Cost me nothing to restock my shop. I made back the initial $25 investment of the shop in the first week the shop was up.

I didn't stop there, however.

The entire time I was doing this, I was also preparing for expansion. I wanted to buy a plot of land in the Shop area of the game as it held a "teleport point" for players and would be easier for me to restock than the one out by spawn (spawn had a teleport point, but my shop there had to be outside a restricted zone and thus was over 150 tiles away from the initial spawn location).

Anyway, the plan had been in motion before I even set up the first shop. I had set up my own base in a swamp, very close to a desert. The swamp was important because nobody would go looking for a base in the swamp to raid it (we did have some limited protections, but they weren't the best) and it was a ready source of endless flat land I didn't have to terraform if I wanted to expand my tree farm. The important part was that I was very close to a desert.

While waiting for my trees to grow, I was out at the desert, harvesting sand. All day. Every day. For six hours. I created 24 furnaces to constantly smelt that sand into glass. The glass was stored in many chests. I think the final count of chests was somewhere around 50. I don't remember how much space these chests held. But, I had a lot of glass. I fueled the furnaces by burning my logs and turning it into charcoal, which was fuel. I created new shovels with the wood I had to more quickly harvest the sand. I used the wood I had to create a ton of chests to house all my glass.

From there, I got a plot of land to put a real shop up on. I tore down the "newbie store" for selling wood and focused entirely on selling glass. My tree farm began being used only for smelting glass and brick.

In the end, I was selling 16 stacks of glass for $0.14. Nobody could compete. A few tried. Each time they tried, I'd just add another stack of glass to that price.

That's when they created the first "Merchant Guild" to try to stop me. For a while, they tried to buy me out of my entire stock of glass and sell it in their own shops for a much higher price (to make more profit off of me). It didn't work. My supply was too large and they couldn't keep me empty for more than a few minutes. When they went offline for the night, I'd stay up until 2 a.m. or later just smelting glass and refilling my stock.

I had more glass than they could buy. I had more money than they did.

I began buying out all the shops of glass they had. Massive cost to me to do that. I lost money doing it. But, no other shop on the server had a supply of glass. Everyone had to come to me to get it. I created the perception on the server that nobody would ever have glass in stock except my shop. I was the only place you could get it. So, people started checking my shop first, before going anywhere else.

At that point, players began complaining to me. About the very thing you talk of your jeweler doing. "You can't charge so little for your glass! You have to charge what your labor is worth!". Oh? Says who? It's just me. It's only my labor. I don't have to pay anyone else for their labor. Because I only charge what it costs me for the raw materials (which was nothing), I could undercut everyone. I could stay in business. I mined two entire deserts dry keeping up with demand. I began selling red brick blocks and stone brick blocks as well (these I had in abundant supply from living in a swamp). My own labor was worth whatever I decided to charge for it. Every cent I earned was 100% pure profit.

That's how I get a foothold in every game economy. I find something insanely common, easy to farm, everyone needs it, and then charge very cheap prices to other players to get it. In essence, if I ever decide to sell my own RPG Maker game, that's what I'll be doing as well.

I would create a game that is insanely cheap, but has a fairly high quality. Or, even for free. It cost me nothing to make the game. I can sell it for anything I like and it will be 100% pure profit. I work a job and that pays me the money I need to even start up my own business venture if I decide to. The only costs to me would just be hosting the game somewhere to be downloaded. I could create a 30 hour game and charge $1 for it if I wanted to. I'd still be making profit doing it. In fact, at that cheap... the profit would likely be insane. If 1,000 people bought the game, I made $1000. If a million people buy it, I made $1,000,000. All of it profit.

For me, it is better to sell at as deep of a discount as possible in order to make the most profit possible. Is it better to sell 100 copies of a game at $20 a piece, or to sell 2000 copies of a game at $1 a piece?

Essentially, for me, it's a marketing strategy. Sell a great game for cheap, and word of mouth does the advertising for you. Joe tells his friend Stan to play your game because it's good. Oh, and it's only $1! It's super cheap! Stan tells Mary. On and on until someone is advertising your game online. On social media. On a website somewhere. Millions of people downloading your game for $1 and enjoying it. Maybe, it even effectively destroys the price scaling of other games.

"Why should I buy your $20 RPG Maker game when I can buy this $1 RPG Maker game and have a lot more fun and more content?"

I'm not a nice merchant. :D
 

jkweath

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@MechScapeZH my biggest recommendation on video editing, especially if you go the cheap route like I have, is to show whatever you make to someone who will give you an unfiltered, unbiased opinion, preferably someone who might be interested in your game or genre too. "Unbiased" is super important here, you need a real opinion, not from someone who's afraid to bruise your ego.

I did that with my first ever trailer with my first ever game, right here on these commercial boards, and got ripped apart by another guy--it felt bad, but in retrospect it helped me a lot.

That said, I have no doubt that the (relatively) lower quality of my trailers has potentially hurt my sales. I hate hate hate the entire process, so I tend to rush through it as fast as I can to get it over with, make sure it gets the point across, upload it and forget about it. I'm better at writing and selecting good screenshots, so I try to put my focus on those things and hope the potential buyer isn't too critical of a trailer that is purely gameplay oriented and lacks any flare or special effects.
 

EthanFox

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For me, it is better to sell at as deep of a discount as possible in order to make the most profit possible. Is it better to sell 100 copies of a game at $20 a piece, or to sell 2000 copies of a game at $1 a piece?
Admittedly, though, this is the point of my jeweller example. Your post reads at the start like you disagree with me, but the rest of the content doesn't sound like you do, so maybe I just wasn't clear enough.

In your above example, a factor always worth considering is "addressable market", sometimes called "reach". I'm sure you don't need me to clarify that because you sound like you know what you're talking about; but for the benefit of others, this is kinda like if you imagine you sold an item to everyone who could possibly buy it, and you reached 100% market penetration, how much you would sell.

Videogames are a bad example in some respects, so a classic example might be a component for a 2017 Honda Civic. Let's say you manufacture this component. Your total "reach" is the total number of 2017 Honda Civics currently in circulation which exhibit a problem with that component.

So if you're choosing "1000 units at 1$ or 1 unit at 1000$", reach is important. In the above example, there might be a million dodgy 2017 Civics, or if it's an obscure part, there might only be 5.

This is why college textbooks are expensive. Supply and demand are factors, but it's more that even if EVERY SINGLE student who is studying, say, the role of Quaternions in Graphical Mathematics buys a textbook, you're gonna sell, what, 200 copies? And that's if you do really well.

This is why some videogames are priced at higher prices than you would expect. For instance, weeb games like those made by Idea Factory, usually coming with ecchi art books and such, tend to go out at quite high prices, stay there for a while, then liquidate at low prices later. They do that because the niche nature of those games makes their addressable market small, so their aim is to try and maximise revenue from those limited users. This is the opposite to a mainstream movie or something like that.

Digital delivery with videogames makes this weird, because it's kinda unique. You're selling something where the supply is effectively infinite (you never run out of copies - in a weird way your supply is actually your capacity to serve customers, which is also kinda infinite too). Traditional boxed videogames worked differently.

I guess what I'm saying is that yes, supply and demand are things, and you should absolutely price your products competitively - there's no point pricing your RPG Maker game at £20k because you, for some reason, think it's worth that - in the hope that one singular crazy rich person will come and buy it. However, within that band there's quite a bit of leeway; our metaphors are weird because we're talking about huge numbers where really you're trying to choose whether to price your Kindle book at 2$ or 5$.
 

MechScapeZH

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@MechScapeZH my biggest recommendation on video editing, especially if you go the cheap route like I have, is to show whatever you make to someone who will give you an unfiltered, unbiased opinion, preferably someone who might be interested in your game or genre too. "Unbiased" is super important here, you need a real opinion, not from someone who's afraid to bruise your ego.

I did that with my first ever trailer with my first ever game, right here on these commercial boards, and got ripped apart by another guy--it felt bad, but in retrospect it helped me a lot.

That said, I have no doubt that the (relatively) lower quality of my trailers has potentially hurt my sales. I hate hate hate the entire process, so I tend to rush through it as fast as I can to get it over with, make sure it gets the point across, upload it and forget about it. I'm better at writing and selecting good screenshots, so I try to put my focus on those things and hope the potential buyer isn't too critical of a trailer that is purely gameplay oriented and lacks any flare or special effects.
I agree completely regarding needing an unbiased opinion- my game & its marketing was improved immeasurably by experiences like the one you described- and yes, it feels bad at the time, but such feedback is extremely valuable.

I'm the same way- I'd like to have a lot of SPX & flare, but I have no idea how to do it. Oh well- if it works for you, it'd certainly work for me. :) Thank you!

Admittedly, though, this is the point of my jeweller example. Your post reads at the start like you disagree with me, but the rest of the content doesn't sound like you do, so maybe I just wasn't clear enough.

In your above example, a factor always worth considering is "addressable market", sometimes called "reach". I'm sure you don't need me to clarify that because you sound like you know what you're talking about; but for the benefit of others, this is kinda like if you imagine you sold an item to everyone who could possibly buy it, and you reached 100% market penetration, how much you would sell.

Videogames are a bad example in some respects, so a classic example might be a component for a 2017 Honda Civic. Let's say you manufacture this component. Your total "reach" is the total number of 2017 Honda Civics currently in circulation which exhibit a problem with that component.

So if you're choosing "1000 units at 1$ or 1 unit at 1000$", reach is important. In the above example, there might be a million dodgy 2017 Civics, or if it's an obscure part, there might only be 5.

This is why college textbooks are expensive. Supply and demand are factors, but it's more that even if EVERY SINGLE student who is studying, say, the role of Quaternions in Graphical Mathematics buys a textbook, you're gonna sell, what, 200 copies? And that's if you do really well.

This is why some videogames are priced at higher prices than you would expect. For instance, weeb games like those made by Idea Factory, usually coming with ecchi art books and such, tend to go out at quite high prices, stay there for a while, then liquidate at low prices later. They do that because the niche nature of those games makes their addressable market small, so their aim is to try and maximise revenue from those limited users. This is the opposite to a mainstream movie or something like that.

Digital delivery with videogames makes this weird, because it's kinda unique. You're selling something where the supply is effectively infinite (you never run out of copies - in a weird way your supply is actually your capacity to serve customers, which is also kinda infinite too). Traditional boxed videogames worked differently.

I guess what I'm saying is that yes, supply and demand are things, and you should absolutely price your products competitively - there's no point pricing your RPG Maker game at £20k because you, for some reason, think it's worth that - in the hope that one singular crazy rich person will come and buy it. However, within that band there's quite a bit of leeway; our metaphors are weird because we're talking about huge numbers where really you're trying to choose whether to price your Kindle book at 2$ or 5$.
Regarding this conversation: frankly much of this economic stuff goes over my head (classic creative-type, right? No business sense whatsoever. :guffaw:), but honestly all this seems like a moot point to me: as @EthanFox said, we don't really charge more than ~$8-9 maximum for our games anyway. I haven't yet seen anyone charge more for an RPG Maker game on any platform.

(Besides, I don't want to "backseat-moderate," but the thread's title is regarding store pages rather than economics. This discussion is far too big for this thread, at least in my opinion.)

Thank you for your help as well!
 

Tai_MT

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No offense intended, but you should bother to learn some economic stuff if you intend to sell your game. Otherwise, you'll need to spend money to hire someone to handle all the business stuff for you. At which point, you have no idea whether or not they're even screwing you over.

I'm a creative type as well, but I realized early on that to "cut costs", I'd have to learn much of that on my own. Marketing is a big sinkhole of cash if you don't know what you're doing and how to do it. Your thread is basically about marketing your game. Without a firm understanding of economics and your potential customer base, it is going to be very difficult to market your game and make sales.

You do need to have some sort of business plan going forward. It isn't as simple as, "I'm just going to sell my game and my biggest concern is whether or not people even like it enough to buy it".

If you take a look at the AAA industry, look how many people actually like their games. Not many. It's been a very long time since I've actually enjoyed one of my game purchases. Yes, even from Indie Developers.

What you need is simply a strong marketing standpoint. A strong plan for how to market your game to the audience you want to reach. This requires at least knowing how economics works. If you don't understand the mechanisms by which you are even willing to part with your own money for a product or service, you can't very well understand how to get others to part with their money in exchange for your product or service.

Sure, sometimes a person might get lucky and sell something that is so universally necessary or amazing that they don't have to figure out how to market it or sell it or manage their money... But, that's sort of rare. It also brings its own sets of problems.

The first thing I often recommend to anyone who wants to sell anything is to take some courses in how to market what they're selling first. I then recommend they also take some courses in business so they can figure out how to manage their money properly. After all, there's a fumbling haphazard way of doing things, and then there's an educated and measured way of doing things with minimal risk.

Even me, a person who spends most of his day writing, playing video games, designing his own game, or working on other art projects... has a plan for how to produce his game, market that game, and what will be done with the profits.

My list includes things like actually applying for a business license as without one, a government can decide you're conducting business illegally by selling your game and hit you with massive fines you can't afford. It also includes budgeting for marketing and hosting services. It includes fees for lawyers if necessary and what I'd need to "break even". It's a business plan with many contingencies. Likewise, even paying state and government taxes for my earnings is even in that plan.

And all of this is from someone who doesn't even plan to sell his first game. Who plans to finish it and update it as frequently as possible while leaving it free. This is from a person who does not ever plan on making "game design" a job at all.

I strongly urge you to consider learning about economics and marketing. If you're going to sell anything to anyone, these are skills you actually need to have. Otherwise, you won't get far.
 

MechScapeZH

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No offense intended, but you should bother to learn some economic stuff if you intend to sell your game. Otherwise, you'll need to spend money to hire someone to handle all the business stuff for you. At which point, you have no idea whether or not they're even screwing you over.

I'm a creative type as well, but I realized early on that to "cut costs", I'd have to learn much of that on my own. Marketing is a big sinkhole of cash if you don't know what you're doing and how to do it. Your thread is basically about marketing your game. Without a firm understanding of economics and your potential customer base, it is going to be very difficult to market your game and make sales.

You do need to have some sort of business plan going forward. It isn't as simple as, "I'm just going to sell my game and my biggest concern is whether or not people even like it enough to buy it".

If you take a look at the AAA industry, look how many people actually like their games. Not many. It's been a very long time since I've actually enjoyed one of my game purchases. Yes, even from Indie Developers.

What you need is simply a strong marketing standpoint. A strong plan for how to market your game to the audience you want to reach. This requires at least knowing how economics works. If you don't understand the mechanisms by which you are even willing to part with your own money for a product or service, you can't very well understand how to get others to part with their money in exchange for your product or service.

Sure, sometimes a person might get lucky and sell something that is so universally necessary or amazing that they don't have to figure out how to market it or sell it or manage their money... But, that's sort of rare. It also brings its own sets of problems.

The first thing I often recommend to anyone who wants to sell anything is to take some courses in how to market what they're selling first. I then recommend they also take some courses in business so they can figure out how to manage their money properly. After all, there's a fumbling haphazard way of doing things, and then there's an educated and measured way of doing things with minimal risk.

Even me, a person who spends most of his day writing, playing video games, designing his own game, or working on other art projects... has a plan for how to produce his game, market that game, and what will be done with the profits.

My list includes things like actually applying for a business license as without one, a government can decide you're conducting business illegally by selling your game and hit you with massive fines you can't afford. It also includes budgeting for marketing and hosting services. It includes fees for lawyers if necessary and what I'd need to "break even". It's a business plan with many contingencies. Likewise, even paying state and government taxes for my earnings is even in that plan.

And all of this is from someone who doesn't even plan to sell his first game. Who plans to finish it and update it as frequently as possible while leaving it free. This is from a person who does not ever plan on making "game design" a job at all.

I strongly urge you to consider learning about economics and marketing. If you're going to sell anything to anyone, these are skills you actually need to have. Otherwise, you won't get far.
I have done a lot of research on economics & marketing. I was joking because it's a stereotype that artists aren't economically inclined & I wanted to keep the thread on topic.

Everything you said is correct & matches up with my research. Thank you so much for your input- it's just not on-topic for this thread.
 

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