What you think about Order society vs. Chao society in RPG Games?

Kupotepo

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This reflective discusses which I intend to learn, understand, and expand my perspectives on how to execute better writing plots for RPG games.
  1. Are heroes have to take justice on their hands or the people in authority help them punishment the villains in your games?
  2. Isn't true that people who survive rather than people who sacrifice actually get honor and virtue in your RPG writing? How your games outlook of heroism?
  3. In many RPG games, I see usually many antagonists die. Should the antagonist always have to die?
  4. Should villains be put in jail or you think they should be finished off?
  5. Can heroes become crazy by an extreme sense of justice? [Can heroes become crazy?]
  6. Should heroes have immunity for violating basic universal moral like killing or stealing in a game without consequences or retribution? [consequentialism game vs escapism game]
  7. [6.1] Are you prefer stability predictability [often forshadowing] or you prefer uncertainty surprise [thing could 50/50 possibility and random accident that no one expect]?
  8. What is your preferred dark story or light story?
For anyone who likes anime, My Hero Academia and for the game, I don't know Persona series. For fantasy, the movie is probably Game of Thrones.

Thank you for your wisdom and experience and for sharing your thinking with me.
 
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The Stranger

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Vice dressed as virtue, as in someone doing a charitable deed for fame and recognition, to be seen as someone good, rather than because they personally feel it's the right thing to do?
 

gstv87

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have you looked at global politics lately?
it's been vice disguised as virtue for like..... I don't know..... 100 years now?

I think it is related to criminology. What do you think about punishment that fits the crime? I would like to ask your effective preference system on punishment on your game so it is not too touchy to the members: deterrence, rehabilitation, retribution, and restoration [forgiving and study why people choose to this crime to prevent this from happening].
some time ago I watched a documentary that tried to explain that violence, disease, and every other problem is not behavioral or genetic, but environmental.
if you live in a world where the air is 99% water, either you grow galls or you die... that's it.
crime is often looked at as being "behavioral" or "genetic", or "predetermined", and it's not: it's environmental.
the criminal was put in an environment of limited choices, and they chose crime.
granted, the choice was most likely involuntary, forced by the circumstances ... but nobody cares about that.
we've settled down in a society where we expect the ones in power to behave accordingly, and fix all the problems there are, and we never stopped to think that maybe they don't even care, and that echoes down the pyramid as people committing crime (or, getting sick, or being uneducated, etc)

I haven't yet developed a judicial system for my story, but I've made a number of gods and heroes related to that, and one of them is playable.
and his backstory is that he works for the god of the underworld, and he's tasked with catching demons and spirits that escape it.
he's no savior, he's no hero, he's just a police man for the man down under, and even he doesn't care about the overworld, he's just concerned about his realm keeping whomever must be kept inside, inside, and whomever is not supposed to be there, outside.
and that's a trope I'd like to work with: if somebody doesn't deserve to be in hell, they'll be cast outside (although maybe not exactly back to the overworld, just *out of hell*, where they don't belong).
that'd be a nice grey area of celestial bureaucracy I'd love to explore.
 

Kupotepo

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@The Stranger, thank you for your contribution.

@gstv87, thank you for your input.

have you looked at global politics lately?
it's been vice disguised as virtue for like..... I don't know..... 100 years now?
:kaojoy:Of course, but I cannot read your mind sadly.

the criminal was put in an environment of limited choices, and they chose crime.
granted, the choice was most likely involuntary, forced by the circumstances ... but nobody cares about that.
It is true about the victor's justice if the other side of people does not live to tell the story. People who survive can say what they want until an archeologist or a historian clears the whole story.

we've settled down in a society where we expect the ones in power to behave accordingly, and fix all the problems there are, and we never stopped to think that maybe they don't even care, and that echoes down the pyramid as people committing crime (or, getting sick, or being uneducated, etc)
Thank you for your reflection sentiment.

he's no savior, he's no hero, he's just a police man for the man down under, and even he doesn't care about the overworld, he's just concerned about his realm keeping whomever must be kept inside, inside, and whomever is not supposed to be there, outside.
and that's a trope I'd like to work with: if somebody doesn't deserve to be in hell, they'll be cast outside (although maybe not exactly back to the overworld, just *out of hell*, where they don't belong).
that'd be a nice grey area of celestial bureaucracy I'd love to explore.
A Soul: Why you are being so mean and take me to hell?
A Reaper: I just do my job like you did your job when you still live.
:smile:
 
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MushroomCake28

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I've moved this thread to General Discussion. Please be sure to post your threads in the correct forum next time. Thank you.


1. It depends, but the answer is probably no. If the justice system doesn't work, is it okay to go rogue and make your own justice? Some will say yes, some will say no. So it's not black and white. However, in typical mainstream stories (moves, video games, books, etc.), the ideal "justice" and good ending tends to be similar: hero wins fairly with the "power" of love and friendship, people are all happy, antagonist loses. Happy ending.

2. It really depends on the story, and also on personal preferences. I like it when the hero sacrifices himself to save the world, and others like it when he survive. I also like it when he sacrifices himself but survive, but everyone thinks he's dead. Honestly, every scenario can work as long as it is well integrated in your story.

3. I'm assuming you meant that the antagonist doesn't usually die (missing a word to express negation in your sentence). Again it depends on your story, but it also depends on your target audience. Obviously if your story's audience is kids, the antagonist can't die. If you have a more mature audience, you can afford to kill the antagonist. At that point, it depends on either it works well with your story.

4. They could go to jail, again if it works well with your story, sure. However, it is proven that people usually prefer when justice is served directly, like when the hero defeats the antagonist, rather than indirectly. But then again, it all depends on your story (I know I've said that a lot, but it's the truth). If you have a story about a detective, of course the usual ending is that the antagonist goes to jail.

5. I don't understand the question.

6. Depends on your story and the genre. There are no strict rules, it just need to fits with your story. Some games have darker stories and there is some killing, some target a more general audience (for example Nintendo) and prefer to keep things clean.
 

Kupotepo

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@MushroomCake28, thank you for moving the thread, and thank you for your though.
Sorry, I am being unclear.
5. Can heroes become crazy by their missions of justice?
 

MushroomCake28

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5. Can heroes become crazy by their missions of justice?
Yes of course, anything is possible. You can pretty much create a story around any theme you want. I can give you a couple examples for a hero that is lost by their sense of justice:
  • Hero cannot use justice to stop criminals because of criminals being too smart and taking advantages of loopholes. So the hero decides to break the laws to stop the criminals. He succeeds, but the fact that he broke the law and the realization that true justice can't stop criminals haunts him.
  • Hero comes into a position of power to stop crimes, but he becomes drunk on power. He is too scared to lose his position to someone else (like in an election for example) so he becomes corrupts and becomes the bad guy just to hold onto his powers.
  • The hero sacrifices everything he has for justice and for stopping the antagonist, but he still loses at the end. So his justice costed him everything and he gained nothing from it.
There are an infinite amount of story you can build around that theme.
 

cthulhusquid

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This reflective discusses which I intend to learn, understand, and expand my perspectives on how to execute better writing plots for RPG games.
  1. Is there truly a universal acceptance concept of Justice or there is none of Justice out there in the RPG realism?
  2. Isn't true that people who survive rather than people who sacrifice actually get honor and virtue in your RPG writing?
  3. In many RPG games, I see any antagonists die. Should the antagonist die?
  4. Can they just put in jail or you think they should be finished off?
  5. Can heroes become crazy by an extream a sense of justice? [Can heroes become crazy?]
  6. Should heroes have immunity for violating basic universal moral like killing or stealing in a game without consequences or retribution? [consequentialism game vs escapism game]
For anyone who likes anime, My Hero Academia and for the game, I don't know Persona series. For fantasy, the movie is probably Game of Thrones.

Thank you for your wisdom and experience and for sharing your thinking with me.
1. Not really sure what you mean by that.

2. In my game Battle Castle, an old man speaks about his days as a soldier. He keeps his sword up on the wall, and says "There's so many things I want to forget... That sword over there reminds me of it all. When I was younger, I couldn't bring myself to get rid of it, like tossing it aside would disrespect the fallen friends I fought side by side with." He's torn between honoring their memories, and trying to heal his own painful past since he still remembers the terrible things he saw.

3. Depends on the game, and antagonist. Some antagonists are just so evil and commit acts so despicable that you feel happy when they are killed off, while others can be respected if they were more honorable (keeping their attacks to the good guy's military, rather than attacking civilians for instance), or have a redemption. Respected villains are more likely to get off with a lesser punishment.

4. See above.

5. Again, here's another example from Battle Castle. One of the main antagonists used to be good, and was so driven by his quest for creating "true peace" that he decided to use the enemies' evil magic against them. This slowly turned him evil, and set him on a path of revenge against his former comrades. He still thinks he is making the world peaceful, and that the "good guys" are perpetuating wars to keep themselves relevant.

6. Depends on the game. If the game aims to be realistic, then there should of course be consequences. If the game is not realistic at all, then usually there are no consequences, because the point is escapism.
 

Riazey

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Is there truly a universal acceptance concept of Justice?
Justice is what you deem it to be. If it's legal to be a bandit in an rpg setting then it's legal to be a bandit! If mercenaries are illegal then mercenaries are illegal, I think it's all based off of the world's mechanics and seeing something different than our own honestly pretty cool~​

Isn't true that people who survive actually get honor and virtue?
Hmmmm I feel for most of these, to be honest, your answer is gonna be however you write it! If you write it as "no one knew the truth" then the person who sacrificed themselves won't get fame, because no one knew it happened! But if you write a survivor passes along the tale and everyone rejoiced them for millenia then that's what happened! It's always a possibility a suvivor comes back and no one cares about the one who died, or even lies about the truth therefore, gaining the fame, so if you write that, that's what happenned!​

Should the antagonist die?
Can they just put in jail or you think they should be finished off?
Honestly I prefer plot twists like the antagonist is a "grey" area, they arent inherently bad etc. Like if an elf antagonist started a war against humans to protect their forest home it doesn't particularily make them "bad" just an enemy. This can be approached widely and in many interesting ways.​

Can heroes become crazy?
Absolutely! If you want to write it, maybe the last hero goes crazy and becomes the bad guy for the current protagonist! And when they realize he's the previous hero they can try to "save" him or something instead. There are many stories/games about people on a "righteous" trip that are doing bad deeds in the name of "justice" too.​

Should heroes have immunity for violating basic universal moral
Eeeehhhh generally speaking no, but they can! I would assume most people will relate more/have a better reaction to morally aligning characters though unless there is plot drive (you steal a jade key from a bad guy to open the evil lair etc).​
A lot of players like to play games as the "bad guy" hero, but I don't think there shouldn't be consequences or at least have them frowned upon because it sits weird with our general understanding of morality, which most people can and will project onto the game. That being said, if something we morally understand to be good is "illegal" i.e say there's a world where you're not allowed to stand up to nobles no matter what, but you save someone from a noble and become the bad guy, it will sit well with a player usually because it's morally understandable in our world.​


What I am basically saying is if you write it it will happen. But certainly, "black and white" stories are the most common, but also the most overused and boring. It's definitely more interesting for story when these types of questions are challenged!​
 

Kupotepo

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@cthulhusquid, I apologize that I did frame the question clearly.
  1. Do heroes have to take justice on their hands or the people in authority help them punishment the villains in your games? [Are your game have laws or lawless?] 1.1 If heroes kill the villains, are nothing bads happen to them?
I hope you understand better. I appreciate your patience with me. Thank you.


@MushroomCake28, thank you for replying back.
1. It depends, but the answer is probably no. If the justice system doesn't work, is it okay to go rogue and make your own justice? Some will say yes, some will say no. So it's not black and white. However, in typical mainstream stories (moves, video games, books, etc.), the ideal "justice" and good ending tends to be similar: hero wins fairly with the "power" of love and friendship, people are all happy, antagonist loses. Happy ending.
In classical RPG games, it is not I fear than the power of friendship and of love. It can withstand anything in the RPG world and can destroy any planets, universes, and dimensions.:guffaw: I hope any nations in RPG world have meetings on the limit of the use of that power.

I like it when the hero sacrifices himself to save the world, and others like it when he survive. I also like it when he sacrifices himself but survive, but everyone thinks he's dead.
Thank you for having a spine and being brave to expressing your though.

Sorry, I did not write complete sentences. Here, I am correct my sentences.
3. In many RPG games, I see usually many antagonists die. Should the antagonist always have to die?

Again it depends on your story, but it also depends on your target audience. Obviously if your story's audience is kids, the antagonist can't die. If you have a more mature audience, you can afford to kill the antagonist.
I understand now. I have to decide which main target is my priority before adding bloodshed.

However, it is proven that people usually prefer when justice is served directly, like when the hero defeats the antagonist, rather than indirectly. But then again, it all depends on your story (I know I've said that a lot, but it's the truth). If you have a story about a detective, of course the usual ending is that the antagonist goes to jail.
Thank you for your wisdom on the subject matter. It is true that people like the taste of sweet vengeance. I like it when some people pretense to be civilized in order to hide their human primary need for violence.

6. Depends on your story and the genre. There are no strict rules, it just need to fits with your story. Some games have darker stories and there is some killing, some target a more general audience (for example Nintendo) and prefer to keep things clean.
7. What is your preferred dark story or light story?
@MushroomCake28, I have to strict rules and I have to repeat every day. I am joking. I agree with you that I have to pick a version of the truth that I want to present to targeted audiences.:kaojoy:

I can give you a couple examples for a hero that is lost by their sense of justice
Thank you for providing useful examples. It dependent on me how much I want to sugar or salt into the story's theme.
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@cthulhusquid, thank you for your insight.

In my game Battle Castle, an old man speaks about his days as a soldier.
Good anecdote for your game.:kaoluv:

Some antagonists are just so evil and commit acts so despicable that you feel happy when they are killed off, while others can be respected if they were more honorable (keeping their attacks to the good guy's military, rather than attacking civilians for instance), or have a redemption. Respected villains are more likely to get off with a lesser punishment.
Thank you for providing a useful tip for me. So you measure how much terrible of the villain base on the damage they cause to civilians or innocent bystanders, right? Do you count against the villain base on their gruesome acts or just only how lives the villain destroys? I think I understand what you said, but I just make me understand you correctly. Thank you for your time.
 
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MushroomCake28

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7. What is your preferred dark story or light story?
Personally I prefer a dark story, but I think a light story might be easier to make for a larger audience.
 

Kupotepo

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5. Again, here's another example from Battle Castle. One of the main antagonists used to be good, and was so driven by his quest for creating "true peace" that he decided to use the enemies' evil magic against them. This slowly turned him evil, and set him on a path of revenge against his former comrades. He still thinks he is making the world peaceful, and that the "good guys" are perpetuating wars to keep themselves relevant.
Thank you for refreshing my memory. I see sometimes your good characters turn to evil by accidental like opening a curse demon box and they let something out. You let the evil spirit out from the box.
Or get trick by others to do terrible things. Ok, I understand good intentions, but terrible actions. Thank you. :popcorn:

Since you here, I would like to inform you.

@cthulhusquid, I apologize that I did frame the question clearly.
Do heroes have to take justice on their hands or the people in authority help them punishment the villains in your games? [Are your game have laws or lawless?] 1.1 If heroes kill the villains, are nothing bads happen to them?
I hope you understand better. I appreciate your patience with me. Thank you.

Sorry, everyone I add the clarifying question?
[6.1] Are you prefer stability predictability [often forshadowing] or you prefer uncertainty surprise [thing could 50/50 possibility]?

@Riazey, thank you for your thought and for your time

Justice is what you deem it to be. If it's legal to be a bandit in an rpg setting then it's legal to be a bandit! If mercenaries are illegal then mercenaries are illegal, I think it's all based off of the world's mechanics and seeing something different than our own honestly pretty cool~
In my RPG, characters have the right to trespass, steal something inside the boxes, not pay taxes and use magic.:kaohi: Just some RPG games, lol.

If you write it as "no one knew the truth" then the person who sacrificed themselves won't get fame, because no one knew it happened! But if you write a survivor passes along the tale and everyone rejoiced them for millenia then that's what happened! It's always a possibility a suvivor comes back and no one cares about the one who died, or even lies about the truth therefore, gaining the fame, so if you write that, that's what happenned!
Thank you for your writing guidance.

What I am basically saying is if you write it it will happen. But certainly, "black and white" stories are the most common, but also the most overused and boring. It's definitely more interesting for story when these types of questions are challenged!
I appreciate your supportive attitude. B&W stories will easy to understand and give answers to the audience directly like Q and A sessions. Sound like I am terrible to the audience. I prefer them to investigate or walk around to learn more than just feeding information. Yes, it would be time-consuming for the audience, but I think they would be more emotional investing to find out what is going on? Do you think so?

Personally I prefer a dark story, but I think a light story might be easier to make for a larger audience.
Thank you for responding back to me.
 
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cthulhusquid

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Thank you for refreshing my memory. I see sometimes your good characters turn to evil by accidental like opening a curse demon box and they let something out. You let the evil spirit out from the box.
Or get trick by others to do terrible things. Ok, I understand good intentions, but terrible actions. Thank you. :popcorn:

Since you here, I would like to inform you.

@cthulhusquid, I apologize that I did frame the question clearly.
Do heroes have to take justice on their hands or the people in authority help them punishment the villains in your games? [Are your game have laws or lawless?] 1.1 If heroes kill the villains, are nothing bads happen to them?
I hope you understand better. I appreciate your patience with me. Thank you.

Sorry, everyone I add the clarifying question?
[6.1] Are you prefer stability predictability [often forshadowing] or you prefer uncertainty surprise [thing could 50/50 possibility]?

@Riazey, thank you for your thought and for your time


In my RPG, characters have the right to trespass, steal something inside the boxes, not pay taxes and use magic.:kaohi: Just some RPG games, lol.


Thank you for your writing guidance.


I appreciate your supportive attitude. B&W stories will easy to understand and give answers to the audience directly like Q and A sessions. Sound like I am terrible to the audience. I prefer them to investigate or walk around to learn more than just feeding information. Yes, it would be time-consuming for the audience, but I think they would be more emotional investing to find out what is going on? Do you think so?


Thank you for responding back to me.
I am currently making three games, and each deals with the villains in their own way.
  1. In Battle Castle (fantasy game), the hero and the government basically can't defeat the main villain, because he is way too powerful. You have to find an ancient hero who is as powerful as the villain, and they fight. The ancient hero either wins or loses. If he wins, the villain dies. If he loses, the world is destroyed. There is no punishment, because the ancient hero literally has a religion based on him and is worshiped by everyone.
  2. In The Wastes (post-apocalyptic game), there isn't a main villain until the end of the game, and you destroy them. However, the villain succeeds in their plan. There is no punishment for the heroes, since no one else knew the villain even existed, and the villains plan causes a huge disruption to society.
  3. In The Cube Trail (fantasy game), the villain is killed by the hero (there are 4 playable characters). There is no punishment, because there is no law on the island, and everyone hated the villain.
 
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Ninjakillzu

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1. In my cyberpunk project, Collector, the main characters are not one to trust authority. They are pretty much the equivalent of mercenaries, who'll do any job as long as it pays well. They take "justice" into their own hands, and vigilantism is common, especially in the rough parts of town. I even wrote an in-game newspaper article about vigilantism being on the rise.

(As gang violence increases, everyday citizens wonder how it can be curbed. While reports to the Police have increased, there are those who take a more "hard-boiled" approach: meeting violence with violence. What follows is an exclusive interview with a citizen who asked to remain anonymous. We've named him "Joe". Joe explains just why he supports vigilantism. "I've been threatened many times by thugs and lowlifes when taking my dog for walk, and even just going outside for some air. Some even wave weapons at me, expecting me to be intimidated by them. Reports to the Police don't help." he said, "Every time I send a report through my EPID, nothing comes of it! I still got threatened day in and day out. Something needs to be done, and this is why the neighborhood has taken up arms. Some punks tried assault my neighbor, but we managed to stop them by shooting one. They ran away, and haven't come back since. Now that's real justice!"

More citizens are arming themselves and when they get pushed by gangs, the citizens push back. Another citizen comments "In some places of the city,
you can't rely on the Police to save you. They can be hours away and you WILL be dead before they arrive. That's why I rely on self defense. A few .45 ACP bullets to the midsection will stop some psycho on combat drugs in their tracks, often for good! That's why justice needs to be in our hands, where it can mean the difference between life and death.")

2. It really depends on the personality of the character. Some people proudly proclaim they are heroes for acting courageous in dire circumstances, while others brush it off as just "doing their duty".

3. I think antagonists can die, but don't always have to. That's too black and white. Everything falls in shades of grey. There are evil people you can let live, and good people you can let die.

4. It depends on if the justice system at large actively wants to put the villain in jail, and the character's intentions on how they want to deal with this matter. If a character falls on the side of dealing out their own version of justice instead of deferring to the justice system, then they will handle the villian as they see fit, even if it means the death of the villain.

5. Heroes, especially well written ones, are not infallible. They are prone to errors in judgement, and have flaws in their character. Someone becoming crazy with their extreme sense of justice is an understandable reaction when something they hold dear is taken away from them.

6. I do not think heroes should have immunity to consequences. I personally prefer a more realistic approach.

7. I like to have both. You could even make the player think an event will happen one way with foreshadowing, and then change it to throw the player off.
 

Tai_MT

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1. I don't know. I don't really write "heroes". I personally don't find them all that interesting as they inevitably become the arbiter of justice and right and wrong and heavily relied upon by the public.

I just write people. People spurred to action, usually for personal reasons. Doesn't matter to me what that tale ultimately includes.

2. My game's outlook on "heroism" is generally the same as my own. Nearly nonexistent. The gameplay itself is designed in such a way that players will "want to be heroic" while many of the characters will chastise them for this behavior and tell them that it's unrealistic.

Even my villains will point out the utter hypocrisy of "heroes" in my stories and writing.

A person does not become a hero by doing heroic things. A person becomes a hero by the rest of society declaring that person a hero for their own reasons. It isn't a mantle a person picks up on their own, it is one thrust upon them by others.

3. No. My personal belief is that dead people hold little value. A living person holds a lot more value. Yes, even a villain. Yes, even a person with an opposing viewpoint. Every RPG I play, I spare as many people as possible. I do not kill unless the game gives me no other option.

Because of this viewpoint, I tend to write my villains in this way. They are just people. People who don't deserve to die because they do things differently, have goals the "heroes" disagree with, or are on the "wrong side of history".

4. If they are a danger to themselves or others, I absolutely endorse putting them somewhere they can't hurt themselves or others. Likewise, I do believe there are also people "too dangerous to let live". That is, they could never be useful. They exist purely to inflict as much harm as possible, no matter what that harm might be. Few people are like that, but those who are should be put down.

5. Heroes, by their very nature, are crazy to an extent. They often take the law into their own hands, they often take short-sighted action without considering consequences, they often inflict a lot of collateral damage around what they are fighting against. They all do eventually become megalomaniacal though. How could any person attain so much adoration and trust and NOT be turned crazy? Or, not begin to believe the hype themselves? If enough people tell you that you are wonderful and amazing and you're a genius... you begin to believe it. If everyone tells you that you're special all the time, you believe you are.

Heroes, by default, are crazy. It's just a matter of how long the road is for them to turn into "extremists". Some writers understand this. Many of the writers for "Doctor Who" have understood this quite a while. It's the reason they give him for bringing "companions" along. It's the companions who make him a better person. He can mess with all of space and time and determine who lives and who dies... But his companions are there to tell him when he's going too far, or being immoral. His companions, who aren't out to save the world, but just to explore it, and they only help where they can.

Without someone to keep a hero grounded, they turn into extremists.

6. Depends on the game world. Society, by and large, are often willing to excuse a great deal of morally reprehensible behavior in a person if they are viewed "as a hero". Yep, even in real life.

It's just a matter of much "weight" the improper actions carry in comparison to the correct actions carry. That is going to depend on the world in which the "hero" resides.

7. Foreshadowing, like anything else in writing, is a tool. If you use the tool poorly, it falls flat and doesn't achieve it's goal. When used well, it can add a whole new dimension to the writing.

There is a reason "Would You Kindly?" has such an impact on a player in Bioshock. Everytime you are given an objective, it shows up just after "Would You Kindly?" is asked of you. A new player wouldn't notice it. But, when the secret of that phrase is revealed to you, you notice it everywhere. You realize that the game was always going to end the way it did because of that phrase.

Whole new dimension to that game once the trick is revealed to you.

But, it has to be done well. If the player figures out the result of your foreshadowing before you reveal it... it's done quite poorly. It loses impact.

8. It sort of depends on this one. I don't really like to "cheer for the badguy" as I find it difficult to do, but there are some instances where I've done just that. I do tend to like slightly "darker" stories to an extent, but they have to be written well.

I think my favorite "Dark Story" was the game "Dead Space" (if we're talking video games). My favorite "Light Story" in terms of video games was probably... um... you know, I don't know. A lot of what is in my library deals with a lot of serious subject matter and lots of terrible events.
 

Kupotepo

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@Ninjakillzu, thank you for your input.
1. In my cyberpunk project, Collector, the main characters are not one to trust authority. They are pretty much the equivalent of mercenaries, who'll do any job as long as it pays well. They take "justice" into their own hands, and vigilantism is common, especially in the rough parts of town. I even wrote an in-game newspaper article about vigilantism being on the rise.
Thank you, that reminds me I have to canonize how my world's operation. It is true that what environment of the world? It is a lawful world or it is a brutal world.
2. It really depends on the personality of the character. Some people proudly proclaim they are heroes for acting courageous in dire circumstances, while others brush it off as just "doing their duty".
I see because of your world, the population fend for themselves, so they feel normalized violence.

3. I think antagonists can die, but don't always have to. That's too black and white. Everything falls in shades of grey. There are evil people you can let live, and good people you can let die.
I agree with your attitude wholeheartedly. Many of both JRPG and WRPG fairytale games have an attitude like if the villains died, underlying problems will disappear immediately; everyone in the fantasy worlds would not suffering anymore and everlasting heavens. lol

4. It depends on if the justice system at large actively wants to put the villain in jail, and the character's intentions on how they want to deal with this matter. If a character falls on the side of dealing out their own version of justice instead of deferring to the justice system, then they will handle the villian as they see fit, even if it means the death of the villain.
I see it is how cruel the world is and how justice operated. Kill or Be Killed dystopian world sounds like a fun game to play.

5. Heroes, especially well written ones, are not infallible. They are prone to errors in judgement, and have flaws in their character. Someone becoming crazy with their extreme sense of justice is an understandable reaction when something they hold dear is taken away from them.
I thought heroes suppose to be worship like deities, build a statue for them, get a promotion to an important position, and parade around the town. I am just like kidding. [Death Note is good anime about the main character become crazy and just like everyone to oppose him.] *Spoiler* [desperate situations call for desperate measures, right!] [Some holds on power, but some holds on to life. Is that correct?]

@Tai_MT, thank you for your response.
1. I don't know. I don't really write "heroes". I personally don't find them all that interesting as they inevitably become the arbiter of justice and right and wrong and heavily relied upon by the public.
"True and sincere " heroes did not want to be call heroes savior or liberator. It is a paradox in the world. I know right. Heroes suppose to be Good people. [Death Note]

Even my villains will point out the utter hypocrisy of "heroes" in my stories and writing.
:kaoluv: Noooooo. Your villains are so terrible. Your villains hurt protagonists more than any weapons or any power of friendship. They used their words against them and introduce the reality to them. lol

Every RPG I play, I spare as many people as possible. I do not kill unless the game gives me no other option.

Because of this viewpoint, I tend to write my villains in this way. They are just people. People who don't deserve to die because they do things differently, have goals the "heroes" disagree with, or are on the "wrong side of history".
Haha. You are the mercy one. Serious, some short-sight players think it is a good idea to just kill off the antagonists. They do not think that how their friends, families, or their underlings feel about plotting a revenge plan against the characters. They ended up creating more enemies.

4. If they are a danger to themselves or others, I absolutely endorse putting them somewhere they can't hurt themselves or others. Likewise, I do believe there are also people "too dangerous to let live". That is, they could never be useful. They exist purely to inflict as much harm as possible, no matter what that harm might be. Few people are like that, but those who are should be put down.
I agree with your attitude wholeheartedly. Many of both JRPG and WRPG fairytale games have an attitude like if the villains died, underlying problems will disappear immediately; everyone in the fantasy worlds would not suffering anymore and everlasting heavens. lol

Without someone to keep a hero grounded, they turn into extremists.
I agree with you on that.
 
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Ninjakillzu

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@Ninjakillzu, thank you for your input.

Thank you, that reminds me I have to canonize how my world's operation. It is true that what environment of the world? It is a lawful world or it is a brutal world.

I see because of your world, the population fend for themselves, so they feel normalized violence.


I agree with your attitude wholeheartedly. Many of both JRPG and WRPG fairytale games have an attitude like if the villains died, underlying problems will disappear immediately; everyone in the fantasy worlds would not suffering anymore and everlasting heavens. lol


I see it is how cruel the world is and how justice operated. Kill or Be Killed dystopian world sounds like a fun game to play.


I thought heroes suppose to be worship like deities, build a statue for them, get a promotion to an important position, and parade around the town. I am just like kidding. [Death Note is good anime about the main character become crazy and just like everyone to oppose him.] *Spoiler* [desperate situations call for desperate measures, right!] [Some holds on power, but some holds on to life. Is that correct?]
It's a brutal world. When the main character wants to join the other characters, one of them replies "You want to join? I don't see why not, but it's a dangerous line of work. Someday you may end up as a corpse, feeding the vermin in a filthy gutter..." There are some rather evil things you can do in the name of money, but there are good things you can do to help others. The main character is free to choose their path regarding these choices.

Violence is very normalized in it's society. Gangs infest large portions of the city, and the citizens feel like they're caught between gang violence and corporate cold wars. In the past, there once was a large scale conflict between mega corporations brought on by a trade secret breach related to a top secret military contract. They actually fought an urban war in the streets with soldiers, with little regard for collateral damage. Today, that doesn't happen. Instead, mega corporations send agents to steal information, assassinate targets, and cause chaos within rival companies.
 

Kupotepo

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7. Foreshadowing, like anything else in writing, is a tool. If you use the tool poorly, it falls flat and doesn't achieve it's goal. When used well, it can add a whole new dimension to the writing.
It is my fault for being unclear. I mean accident both antagonist or protagonist did not know or expect. Accidentally, the rock falls off the building and kill the antagonist or light strike. Or do you think that is too random? And being mean to players who like playing a detective or like prediction? Yes, it is a disruptor of the pattern.

8. It sort of depends on this one. I don't really like to "cheer for the badguy" as I find it difficult to do, but there are some instances where I've done just that. I do tend to like slightly "darker" stories to an extent, but they have to be written well.
haha, one more people who like dark and complicate stories. [Dead Space, fun shooting zombie, and alien invasion game]
 
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@Tai_MT I write my characters as people first and foremost, as well. My "heroes" almost always get forced into their situation, and often have doubts about why they were "chosen". Party members also express these thoughts.
One of my heroes goes along with being chosen because he was sick and tired of staying in his village, and wanted to do something else with his life for a change. In another game, the main hero doesn't think of himself as a hero originally, but as the quest progresses, he becomes paranoid and thinks he's the only one who can make a difference, and that the government is trying to stop him.
 

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