Whats a good method for creating my own custom sprites/tilesets?

Discussion in 'Resource Support' started by LuckyLeafGames, Feb 11, 2017.

  1. LuckyLeafGames

    LuckyLeafGames Veteran Veteran

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    Obviously nobody will take me seriously if I rely on the RTP for everything. That'd make me a scrub. I want to know how I can get started designing my own characters and importing them into the program? I have Gimp, but don't know how to use it well and I have heard of Piskel. I also wonder how the pros over here go about it? Do they hand draw their stuff, do they literally draw on their computer via a special touch program or what? I don't know where to start and would like to know what the consensus over here is on designing and using custom made characters/maps. Thanks.
     
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  2. Soul Tech

    Soul Tech Time Traveler Veteran

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    I started editing the rtp sprites, changing the colors, merging them, can be a base to start with pixel art, watch tutorials on internet may be another alternative to learn how to use a design program like gimp or others, it's just a matter of time. And...Not is it that by using rtp nobody is going to take you seriously, there are excellent games that use a lot of rtp resources and that is okay, it all depends on the originality with which they are used.
    Good luck:cutesmile:
     
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  3. Fugama

    Fugama Means well, but messes up sometimes. Veteran

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    I enjoy making the occasional pixel art myself. As for how to make your own things, Look at the images that already exist. For battler sprites set in MV, set your grid equal to image width/number of sprite columns X image height / number of sprite rows. Right click -> properties will show you an images dimensions and a calculator will tell you whatever the number is. This helps you divide your work space into the exact frames you'll need. Somewhere on the forum there was an image dividing up and naming which set of frames represent which actions but basically you have three frames and each movement will be read in the order of "1->2->3->2->1" before going back to neutral stance.

    For character sprites it's the same thing for setting up a grid. Aside from that, just look at what each character frame is doing in your maker's default walk sprites and mimic those motions in your art.

    Also there's other people who make commercially usable RTP replacements.

    But, as Soul Tech said, there's no shame in using the games RTP and just being original in other regards.
     
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  4. Sharm

    Sharm Pixel Tile Artist Veteran

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    Making my own tiles and sprites is the reason I like RPG Maker. I learned most things by looking at how the RTP does it and testing things out with my own art. Reading through the Resource Standards section of the help file is enormously helpful. I'd recommend starting out by taking an existing style and expanding on it, through editing or making things from scratch in the same style, instead of doing something completely new. Making enough resources for a game is a lot more work than anyone thinks it's going to be. If you start out with something that exists you'll have something usable no matter what point you burn out at.

    The programs you use don't matter too much. You'll want something that supports transparency, lets you save in png, and layers are so useful it's almost a necessity, but other than that it's preference and depends a lot on what type of art you're making. The RTP's tiles aren't pixel art, for instance, so a pixel program won't be very helpful for that, but it would be helpful for making the RTP styled sprites, which are pixel art. I personally prefer Pyxel Edit for making pixel tiles and Aseprite for animations, and GIMP for editing. I haven't settled on a favorite program for making non-pixel tiles, probably Krita since it has the wrap canvas feature.

    Learning the art style itself is a whole different thing. I learned how to be a good pixel artist through lots of tutorials, practice and getting feedback from other artists and not being too proud to listen and try again. The basics of art have a lot of crossover no matter the medium so learn the basics of color and form and so on from anywhere.
     
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  5. LuckyLeafGames

    LuckyLeafGames Veteran Veteran

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    Wow thanks for the useful info! Does it matter how big the sprite/tile art is when you are making it, or can you always resize it later? I will check out those programs.
     
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  6. Fugama

    Fugama Means well, but messes up sometimes. Veteran

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    You can always start smaller in pixel art and upscale without fear of distortion. From what I understand though, image size is restricted based on what kind of resource you're adding. for example, iconsets have a specific width they have to be but can be however tall and all the icons need to be 64x64 (I think that's what it was).

    Tilesets have a set width and height

    Characters are completely resizable but make sure the aspect ratio is consistent.

    I think that's correct but it's been a minute
     
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  7. Sharm

    Sharm Pixel Tile Artist Veteran

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    It matters quite a bit. If you're using pixel art it has to be exactly the right size. If you're doing non-pixel stuff it's a little more flexible, but you'll only want to work the same size or bigger because scaling up means the computer is making up information and it looks all fuzzy. The resource standards in the help file talk about what size the image needs to be.

    IF you work at the right ratio, you can have pixel art be a different size than the default, which is what I think Fugama means, but only very specific sizes will work. So a 16x16 tile can scale up cleanly to 32x32 because it's double the size so double pixels, or 48x48 which is triple the size, because everything still ends up square and whole. But you can't make a 32x32 tile upscale cleanly to 48x48 because it's 1.5 times bigger. You'll end up with a bunch of half sized pixels. And none of those will scale down without becoming a complete mess. I'd say just skip this whole mess and only work on pixels true to size, but if you're wanting to make something in the style of Pixel Myth, POP! Horror, Time Fantasy, Old School Modern, or any of the other pixel tiles out there you may need to know this.
     
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  8. Kes

    Kes Global Moderators Global Mod

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    I've moved this thread to Resource support. Please be sure to post your threads in the correct forum next time. Thank you.

     
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