Why do you become a game maker?

Discussion in 'General Lounge' started by callmedan, Oct 31, 2017.

  1. callmedan

    callmedan Friendly Stranger Veteran

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    I'd love to know the reason why you become a game maker because I found it interesting :kaoswt2: It doesn't matter you're professional or not.
     
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  2. dbchest

    dbchest Beast Master Veteran

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    favorite pastime since childhood.
     
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  3. gstv87

    gstv87 Veteran Veteran

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    because the game-making companies keep missing the point.
     
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  4. Amenti

    Amenti *Grandiose* Veteran

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    I always have wanted to make a game. I am no pro, but at least MV will grant me that desire.
     
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  5. kirbwarrior

    kirbwarrior Veteran Veteran

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    I've been wanting to make games before my first memories. I found Zelda Classic RPG maker and it just spiraled from there. I think I've made a game in every rpg maker other than 95. And I programmed a simplistic mario game on my calculator during high school. It's in my blood.
     
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  6. Canini

    Canini Veteran Veteran

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    To express myself and put the characters from my world in a new scenario.
     
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  7. Lornsteyn

    Lornsteyn Sleepy Dragon Veteran

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    I wanted to make oldschool RPGs like my favorite games, thats why I bought RPGMaker.
    Like gstv87 said, the gamecompanys nowadays just fail and ruin their once great franchises.
    If I can create one game and maybe some people like playing it, Im satisfied.
     
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  8. Guiguimu

    Guiguimu The best revenge is massive success Veteran

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    I always wanted to tell my stories in an interactive way. I love books and the wonderful feelings they bring, but I wanted to show my entire vision of that story to the people, allow them to see the world I created. That's when I found RPG Maker.
     
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  9. cabfe

    cabfe Cool Cat Veteran

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    I like writing stories since my childhood, as well as play games. But I never thought of making my own until I played To the Moon.
    That's when I realized that it was actually easier (well, you know what I mean) than I thought. There was this RPG Maker engine and it was possible to make games other than RPG with it!
    So, I got interested in it and started making my own game.
    I released a demo of my alpha, to test the waters. I was totally ignorant of what had already been done or what people would like to play. But people loved my demo!
    From then, I had to finish it (although I never thought of quitting half-way, it would just have been limited to my relatives).
    Being entrusted with people's love for your game and their expectations is a great engine in itself. :thumbsup-right:

    And I learned so much about game making in general that I recommend everyone to give it a try. I no longer look at games with the same eyes anymore B)
     
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  10. MMMm

    MMMm Veteran Veteran

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    Because my dream video game won't exist until I create it.
     
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  11. robhr

    robhr come on die young Veteran

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    Because I think I'm king @#$% and can make a game as well as the mainstream companies making games.

    Also I've just liked writing stories since, like, as young as I can remember.
     
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  12. Caitlin

    Caitlin \(=^o^=)/ Kitten shall rule the world!!! Veteran

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    (=^.^=) Well, I've always loved to write, sit around and tell stories in an verbal role play, play video games, write poetry and discovered RPG Maker mostly accidentally when I tried to find the 'lesser of two evils' versions of the games I wanted to play. You know, avoiding ROMS by finding 'Fangames'. (=._.=) Discovering the "just as evil as ROMS, only later I discovered that, but that's neither here or there. I've mostly been playing around, but at a certain time, I decided to go commercial and make the game that I always wanted to play. I love Science Fiction, Fantasy and not being a 'Christian' is hard, because most of the time, there's an extreme GOOD vs EVIL going on in most games. While I am not really into that, mostly, protagonist vs antagonist. If I don't create the game, it will never exist.
     
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  13. Ms Littlefish

    Ms Littlefish Dangerously Caffeinated Global Mod

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    I used to write stories and then write music and make artwork to each chapter. I was, "Huh...y'know...like a game?!" Seems like a good way to pick at all my creative sides.
     
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  14. NicholasNC

    NicholasNC Veteran Veteran

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    Its fun.
     
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  15. Yitzi Litt

    Yitzi Litt Made Nepenthe — An RPG that's one giant dad-joke Veteran

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    I wasn't really interested in games—and then I played Undertale.
    The deeper philosophical aspects of it just blew me away, and made me realize that video games can really be art. I thought I'd try out making my own, and found out that I love the process. It's also a joy meeting fellow geeks;)
     
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  16. TheoAllen

    TheoAllen Self-proclaimed jack of all trades Veteran

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    There was once an RM games made in VX way back before at 2008 in rmvx dot net (the site is already down long time ago). The game was not really great, especially the mapping had lot of fails. Probably no one ever remembered the game, or even know if it's existed. But, I liked the story despite those fails. I was around teen and didn't know anything about how to do something right in RM. So it never bothered me.

    Knowing an RM could tell an amazing story like that, I inspired to do the same. The creator might not know that his game made me stays in RM up to this day. Even though I ended up being scripter rather than a story writer
     
    Last edited: Nov 13, 2017
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  17. Astel

    Astel The (grey) knight with that funny look Veteran

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    Because.... why not? :kaohi:
     
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  18. peq42_

    peq42_ Yeet Veteran

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    Simply that xD
    I played with game maker, Unity, RPG Maker(i think it was XP),001 game creator,etc

    And after years...i decided to come back to RPG Maker(Ace and now MV) to try to get into SERIOUS BUSINESS B)

    It's fun to make games. Your learn useful things, think about stories, listen to good musics,etc it's a great use of free time(I also learned a lot of english because of it, not that i'm professional though :blink: )
     
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  19. Tai_MT

    Tai_MT Veteran Veteran

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    I think I posted my story to the forums at some point. Might've been lost to eternity. It's certainly been a while since I've answered the question, to be quite honest.

    To be short on it:

    I've made games my whole life, before I ever realized that's what I wanted to do. And by "wanted to do", I don't mean, "be a game designer, make a lot of money, be part of the AAA companies", etcetera. I mean, "make games as a hobby, studying game theory, player psychology, game systems" and whatever else falls into that bag of tricks. That's, honestly, what I like.

    As a kid, I'd create games for my friends and I to play outside. We'd play "Jurassic Park" and I'd play the dinosaurs while also telling them what all the landmarks in my yard were going to be, and what counted as food, and what things were weapons, and how you could heal. We did the same thing with "War" in my backyard. When it was too cold to play that stuff, we'd play "Animals" and make trails in the snow that were "burrows" and half would be predators and half would be prey. Predators had to run along the trails and only the Prey could make new ones, but making new ones took real life time, so you couldn't use it as an escape. I created card games, and my own version of a "tabletop" before I even knew what D&D actually was. I built RPGs in Word and Excel. Later on, I built a "play by e-mail" game on Homestead (free website creation kit) for Pokémon. Never had many players for it, but I also moved on to make RPGs on Message Boards. Those didn't go so well either.

    Finally, sometime in High School... I discovered RPG Maker 2000. A program that had been pirated, translated into Russian, and required you go find the RTP yourself as well as a translation patch and a Text Fix. I managed to cobble it together and get it working. Granted, I was a total noob and had no idea what I was doing, but I made a few simple 10 minute games with it. I ended up putting it aside fairly quickly. I didn't have the patience for it. I also couldn't write a story.

    Cue my 11th year of school (close to the end of High School, one more year remaining before graduation). I got really into reading. I mean... I was essentially flunking a third of my classes just so I could read. I did this voraciously. Don't get me wrong, I was always a fan of reading, it was something I'd done throughout my childhood, but it was never something I went out of my way to do. Anyway, in High School, I consumed literature. The worlds that flew open before me were amazing, magical, interesting.

    I came across a book. "Ender's Game" by Orson Scott Card. This book changed my life. I went from reading about other worlds, to realizing that I could create those other worlds. His writing style was simplistic, somewhat vague, but powerfully descriptive. I figured out, "If someone else can write like that, get published, win awards, and be this popular... Why can't I? Writing has to be simple!".

    Pro tip: It's not.

    But, that book set me onto consuming stories (not just books!) with the intent to analyze them. How do I write something compelling? How do I use proper descriptions? How do I find my own voice among the multitude of countless billions of people who had told stories before me? I didn't figure that out until 5 years out of High School.

    I rediscovered creating games. I found the old RPG Maker 2000 program (which still wasn't released in the US of A yet), and tooled around with it again. I still lacked the patience to deal with it. But, I had created the basic rudimentary storyline that I've been using in a lot of different places. I had also created a rudimentary RPG system and achievements (yep, figured out how to code Achievements in RPG Maker 2000 on my own). The story was... not great. It was scrapped. The game too? Also scrapped. I still have some of the initial concept documents floating around, but for the life of me, I probably couldn't tell you what they were for.

    I spent a few years more writing, just trying to tell a story (the same story I'm still trying to tell :D ). If you want to know what reignited my passion in game creation after that... It would be TheSpoonyOne. If you don't know who that is, YouTube him. He was telling stories about playing D&D. It was a game I'd wanted to try out for a few years, but had never done. I found two players (my cousin and his dad) and they were willing to let me try being a DM. So, I bought the books. I read them voraciously (I do so love how that word rolls off the tongue! Also, this was 4th Edition). I learned that I basically had no idea what I was doing in game design.

    But, reading the books gave me ideas. Creating a game isn't systems and levels and loot. A game is a story. It's characters. It's writing. What's more? It's interactive writing! I provide the world, the rules, the scenario... And the players do what the players do!

    I looked around online to see if I could track down a modern RPG Maker. You know, just in case the company was still in business or something. Or, if not, maybe I could find a freeware modern version of the program.

    I came across this website. $70 for VX Ace. I had no idea if this was a good deal or not. I didn't even know what it at all had as features. I just assumed, "RPG Maker 2000, but better everything". That's... not quite right (many of my favorite features were missing... and remain missing even into MV). But, it gave me a launching pad. I paid for the maker, made a couple posts to the forums to get my bearings on using a program I hadn't extensively used in years... And realized my story sucked.

    A quick post basically detailing a synopsis of my prototype game and a single playtest I'd run basically proved I had no idea what I was doing yet. Basically, I was forcing players to do really terrible things for the sake of my story. A couple posters made me realize that it would be far more emotional if it was a choice instead.

    I became an amateur game dev on that day. The day I learned that it's the player's interaction with your media that makes it memorable, worthwhile, and good storytelling. I'm telling half a story with my world. I built it. I created the rules. I created the heroes and the villains. I created the battlefields and tools they'd need. But, the player would tell the other half of the story. From a writing standpoint, that is exciting beyond measure.

    Writing is basically all I really love to do. But, creating games gives me this very unique way of telling stories, of creating worlds, and having people walk away with their own unique experiences. That's why I've stuck with this so long. It's why I transferred my game project from VX Ace over into MV, basically rebuilding it from scratch with all the new stuff I'd learned.

    Honestly, I want to tell stories. That's why I am an amateur game dev. It's a unique medium that offers essentially endless possibilities. You get to manipulate players, emotions, gameplay. How could I turn that down? How could I pass that up? The chance to make the audience of my stories... part of those stories? And! I wouldn't even have to be present to do it!

    That's the watered down version of the story with all the details missing, ha ha.
     
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  20. Dalph

    Dalph Nega Ralph™ Veteran

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    - Game Development is like a playground for creative minds.
    - It's a hybrid field and usually improves your writing, alongside your artistic and programming skills.
    - Making games is challenging but fun.
    - Someone liking your work makes the effort satisfying.
    - Someone disliking your work sometimes helps you to improve (as long as the criticism given is constructive and is not just biased opinion or insults).
    - Makes you a more technical person (you won't see games in the same way anymore).
    - Can even become a job with decent income if you are skilled, focused enough and have thick skin.
     
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