Why don't you sell your game? How can I change your mind?

Lars Ulrika

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Actually these are projects ABOUT scandinavia, but to sign up, you still have to be a US or UK permanent resident.
 

Victor Sant

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In fact you can register and start a project there no matter where you are from. But you won't be able to retrieve the funds.
 

SomaelCK

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In fact you can register and start a project there no matter where you are from. But you won't be able to retrieve the funds.
That sound pretty dodgy and unfair... they shouldn't have let the project start in the first place :angry:
 

Victor Sant

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The terms of use doesn't let it. But the user can simply lie and say they're from US/UK, and start the project. The real verification to make sure they're from these places are done only when you they to retreive the funds.

As an alternative to kickstarter there is indiegogo, wich allows people from outside of UK/US. But indiegogo community is by far smaller than kickstarter.
 
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EFizzle

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http://www.kickstart...ncient-dystopia

It personally makes sick that something where he didn't even rename the classes or items, weapons etc makes $5000 (so far)
If he could get a kickstarter to raise $5,000 with just that... Then most of the awesome RPGs I've seen here are worth millions, in the eyes of Kickstarter. That game looks like complete bullcrap compared to the pure awesomeness elsewhere. I feel sorry for those 6 people that spent $150 on a highschooler's first project... Sigh... The whole Intro's sad enough... I'm sorry, but I agree, that makes me sick...
 

Shaz

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Alright folks, let's stop with all the negativity.

At least the guy's having a go, and it's up to the individual what they want to back. Obviously, something he's said or done has impressed the right people.

Back to the topic, please.
 
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Lambadelta

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I plan to make games for fun at the moment.

My first game I plan to make it quite big so it will take forever to finish since I plan to replace most of the RTP graphics with custom or edited versions. I plan to learn more about games development and programming in university next year (hopefully) and then start my way to commercial game development.

I don't feel upset by the person who made quite a bit from kickstarter for his RTP only game. If the story and mechanics are good it shouldn't matter.
 

TheCastle

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If he could get a kickstarter to raise $5,000 with just that... Then most of the awesome RPGs I've seen here are worth millions, in the eyes of Kickstarter. That game looks like complete bullcrap compared to the pure awesomeness elsewhere. I feel sorry for those 6 people that spent $150 on a highschooler's first project... Sigh... The whole Intro's sad enough... I'm sorry, but I agree, that makes me sick...
Lets see when I was 16 I made doom and Quake maps for free. Would have killed to pull in a cool 5k

But you have to realize man at that age accomplishing anything solid is a feat. Even if its a bunch of base assets and an unchanged engine finishing a game with a coherent plot from start to end with proper balance is nothing small. If he can pull this off at 16 hes going to be a freaking monster when hes older.
 

Clord

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Lets see when I was 16 I made doom and Quake maps for free. Would have killed to pull in a cool 5k

But you have to realize man at that age accomplishing anything solid is a feat. Even if its a bunch of base assets and an unchanged engine finishing a game with a coherent plot from start to end with proper balance is nothing small. If he can pull this off at 16 hes going to be a freaking monster when hes older.
According to his own Kickstarter page. He didn't make the story almost at all. In fact he probably is going to share that profit since there is other people who do quite bit a work if that page is to believe.

As long he does not push that game out as "finished" without even needing that profit to finish it, it is fine. Then again he already shares his game "alpha" for the backers and not call it finished.

Also a stress such initial success can cause is quite remarkable for the guy who is not used to it yet. So I can definitely understand why he would need profit to make it less stressful by having some staff for the project.

If he wants any.
 

Shaz

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This topic has become very spammy. It is about what obstacles are preventing you from selling your game. If what you have to post does not contribute to this topic, please don't post it here.
 

Sephiloud

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I honestly don't see any problem wih selling a game. I have not sold (or released) any of my own, but that doesn't mean I wont.

The only obstacle I can see with selling a game is resourcess. Usin the defualt sprites isn't the smartest route. Making one from scratch is difficult, but using someone elses and then making money from it isn't a smart route either.The same can be applied to the games music, and that can be even harder to create then sprites. But, if the game is 100% original, then there shouldn't be a problem in making some money off of it...
 

Lars Ulrika

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Selling a game with rtp graphics is totally ok as long as the game is good ;) . I think it can be a "starter" project to then get funds to make a more ambitious project hiring a staff to make killer custom graphics and so on, depending on what your weaknesses are.

Actually I'm not a graphist but I think I'm a decent story-teller and music maker so I focus on this, use the rtp and am gonna make a commercial game this way. You can make beautiful games with rtp , you "just" need the skill to achieve that ;)

But well, that's my thought after looking around what is actually on the market.
 

TheCastle

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I have done a lot of research into methods to take advantage of the opportunity that something like Kick starter provides. There is a lot more to this than meets the eye. Unless you want to go the route of Dwarf fortress where all you do is accept donations making the game is only a bit more than half the battle. coordinating a team of people and making all the important design choices is extremely helpful however this also causes a lot of potential issues. The very second your project is meant for commercial use you have to make sure that any potential team members sign a NDA. Bringing other people on to the team also requires you to have source control which is yet another major hurdle. If you want to pay people money you need to start a company that is limited liability. They will also have to sign contracts. Contracts and NDAs mean lawyers... If you want to get your game on steam you need to have a company as well. Starting a company and getting lawyers costs money and can have all kinds of effects on how you do your taxes... (bleh)

Kickstarter is also another beast too. There are tons of hidden fees if you are not careful that 40 grand you pulled into the project will be cut down to almost nothing before you even get started. You have to really plan ahead and be ready for any costs that you might run into. For example: it might sound easy to say "For 100$ you can play a demo of the game and get a T shirt and beta test!" If the game gets 1000 backers you are going to need a metric hell ton of T shirts an infrastructure to support hundreds of beta testers and a proper web page that allows for people to get accounts with passwords so they can play the exclusive demo. Say goodbye to that 30 grand you think you made and say hello to a world of pain.

Not to mention making the game isnt an easy task by itself... Also I am sure there is a lot more than I have listed too... There are a ton of pitfalls and money sinks...
 
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Shaz

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I'm making a commercial game, and I've done very few of the things you listed. NDA, contracts, lawyers ... I haven't used any of those - I'm happy to trust the people who are making resources, and it appears that they're all happy to trust me too. I do have a company, but even that isn't a necessity.

Down the track, once you have a few games and you know you're doing something right, you'd certainly want to look into that stuff. But it is not a barrier to making your first few commercial games, by any means.

And with Kickstarter, just be smart about what you offer. Tiers aren't based on how many backers you get or how much in funding you get (at least not last time I looked), but in how much each person contributes. Offer a free copy of the game to anyone who backs for $10 (since that's what many games go for anyway, so they're just pre-ordering). Offer the game and some sprites to $20 backers - it only takes a little of your time to separate the sprites, and costs you nothing more. Offer concept art to $30 backers - again, something you already have and will cost you nothing but a little time to prepare (might have to run this by your artists first). Offer an NPC named after any $50 backers. All that involves is either changing some character's name you already have in the game, or adding a new character who can just provide information or quips. Offer a side quest for any $75 backers - same as above - just rename an NPC or add a new one and a new small side quest. None of those things cost any more money than the game is already going to cost to produce. And if you DO offer things that cost extra money, make sure they're offered for the higher tiers, where the amount funded would cover the $10 for the game itself plus production of whatever it is that you're offering. Just put thought into what you're going to provide, how you'll provide it, and what it's going to cost you in time and money to produce, and make sure that you're still gaining.
 

IsFutureBright

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Well I must admit I never really thought of RPG Maker games as real games until seeing 'To the Moon' doing well on steam and with the critics, you know. Since then I've said to myself that it all depends on the skill you have with the tools you're using. I think all you need to do is work hard on your game even with default sprites/music/battle-system and all, just make the game. When it's done, share it, improve it. When it get's to the level people are finding it amazing, and you think there's no need to work on it, see if paying for resources will help it turn into an even better experience.
 

TheCastle

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I'm making a commercial game, and I've done very few of the things you listed. NDA, contracts, lawyers ... I haven't used any of those - I'm happy to trust the people who are making resources, and it appears that they're all happy to trust me too. I do have a company, but even that isn't a necessity.

Down the track, once you have a few games and you know you're doing something right, you'd certainly want to look into that stuff. But it is not a barrier to making your first few commercial games, by any means.

And with Kickstarter, just be smart about what you offer. Tiers aren't based on how many backers you get or how much in funding you get (at least not last time I looked), but in how much each person contributes. Offer a free copy of the game to anyone who backs for $10 (since that's what many games go for anyway, so they're just pre-ordering). Offer the game and some sprites to $20 backers - it only takes a little of your time to separate the sprites, and costs you nothing more. Offer concept art to $30 backers - again, something you already have and will cost you nothing but a little time to prepare (might have to run this by your artists first). Offer an NPC named after any $50 backers. All that involves is either changing some character's name you already have in the game, or adding a new character who can just provide information or quips. Offer a side quest for any $75 backers - same as above - just rename an NPC or add a new one and a new small side quest. None of those things cost any more money than the game is already going to cost to produce. And if you DO offer things that cost extra money, make sure they're offered for the higher tiers, where the amount funded would cover the $10 for the game itself plus production of whatever it is that you're offering. Just put thought into what you're going to provide, how you'll provide it, and what it's going to cost you in time and money to produce, and make sure that you're still gaining.
I agree with your sentiment about just giving away digital content. But if your goal is to only give backers a copy of the game and some digital content based on a tiered system don't you need to have a way to send them that data legally? You cant just email 1000+ people a copy of your game, 2000+ people a copy and some artwork, 500+ a promise to make an npc named after them.

And yes I realize I am most likely being overly careful with the legal stuff. Its hard for me to think about it any other way. Whenever I work with people in a casual mod community style environment it was a lot more like what you describe. But when money comes into play I say its better to be cautious than sorry for both you and the people you are supporting. Either way we live in interesting times these days when its possible to even have this conversation.

side note: I feel as though offering backers a chance to have quest or npc named after them is a fools errand. no offense but that sounds like a really big mistake on any level...
 
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Lars Ulrika

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side note: I feel as though offering backers a chance to have quest or npc named after them is a fools errand. no offense but that sounds like a really big mistake on any level...
I don't think so, especially for the side quest, it requires some work to create and it provides something really unique to the backer. Many people like this kind of stuff I could witness this on some comic projects I followed, this kind of offer was really succesful.

I don't see in what it is a "fool errand", actually if I was the backer I would enjoy being able to name some npc and even better , propose some side quest.
 

Shaz

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Most Kickstarter projects I've seen limit the higher tiers to 20, 15, 10 people. I don't see why anything would be "illegal" about emailing digital content? Difficult maybe, but not illegal. And no, I wouldn't send them all copies of the game. We're talking about commercial games with DRM that's unlocked by a key. So you would email each person their key and a link to download the game. And for those who get the artwork, put it up online and send them a link, and if you're worried about others getting to it even though you haven't made the URL public, add password protection and email them the password. And no, I wouldn't name NPCs for 500 different people. Again - you have to be smart about what you offer AND to how many people. If you can't accomplish it on a large scale, don't offer it to a large number of people.

Re the point about side quest and NPC - it's really not that hard. Side quest involves a little more effort, but it doesn't have to be anything grand. NPC is super easy - go to a character you've already created, change their name. Nothing hard at all about that. It takes a couple of minutes, you've incurred no additional cost, and have made several people very happy that they backed your project. And again, you're talking SMALL numbers - no more than 20 or 30 for larger $$$ backers - do you consider it too much work to create a character and give it the name of one of your backers, if they're willing to pay you $50 just to be in your game?

The side quest would be one YOU design, but the person you're doing the quest for is an NPC with the backer's name. You don't have to let THEM tell you what side quest to put in. You don't think the effort of doing that is worth $75 someone might give you to become a useful character in your game? Again, costs you nothing but a bit of time.
 
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TheCastle

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Yeah I can see that. Limiting it to 20 people and just renaming a npc seems ok. 500 people and it would be too much XD

I feel that while it can be neat if its something noticeable to other players it may cheapen the experience a bit. I have seen things even worse like for X amount even getting a playable character named after you... Just not my cup of tea, maybe I am wrong. *shrugs*

I think I have a limit on the amount of emails I can send out. I think its a pretty common thing to have to have a special setup to deal with thousands of emails and DRM security keys. That's only if the game is surprisingly successful. Unlikely too happen but could be a potential nightmare... You would be completely SOL if you ended up getting 10k backers....

My plan is to finish a demo of the game literally release the demo to everyone then say here take a look. This is the project. Donate if you are interested in seeing it fully finished. Donations of 10+ get you a copy of the full game when its done. Keeping it as simple as possible. Focus on the game get it done make it good worry less about other stuff.
 
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