Why publish with Aldorlea?

Joewoof

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I've seen quite a number of RPG Maker developers choosing to publish via Aldorlea Games, even on Steam. Why are they so popular? Do they take a really low cut for the support/marketing they provide?
 

Lars Ulrika

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I don't know how much he takes on the sales but let me say it this way :


- I didn't release anything yet but if I do, I'd rather release it through a company who knows how to market my game and obviously gets the job done than alone and get lost in promotional hell because I have no clue about how to do that properly alone.
And I would definetely consider a company like Aldorlea (or Amaranth actually) for this because they totally fit the bill.
 

bgillisp

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I think one of the reasons is people know that the people who to go Amaranth games to buy games are looking for RPGMaker games, and your game will find it's target audience this way, as opposed to being a forgotten game 4 days after it comes out on steam.
 

Shaz

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lol @bgillisp - the OP was asking about Aldorlea Games :D


But yes, the argument applies to both - lots of their own games released, a good following of RPG and RPG Maker lovers, experience with publishing & marketing games.


Degica also publishes games, so there's another option.  As far as I know, none of them require exclusivity, so you could make a deal with all of them and get your game released on several sites.
 

bgillisp

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@Shaz: I actually thought they were the same for some reason, just Amaranth was the bigger version. Guess I heard wrong :).


But glad to know I wasn't too off on the idea of why people might go there.
 

Shaz

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two completely different companies :)
 

RishigangiX

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I have seen the growth of Aldorlea from the days they released the Laxius Power series, and it was an impressive growth to say the least.
They have done well with their own games from the beginning (even though they have changed their polices quite a lot compared to the past), I presume they will do well with the games of other developers as well.
 

Lars Ulrika

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I presume they will do well with the games of other developers as well.
As far as I know they already did with Undefeated and some others. 
 

amerk

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Lol at bg's comment as well, since I read the title and my mind went to Amaranth as well. But as others said, Amaranth and Aldorlea seem to cater a bit more to the casual / RM crowd a lot more than Steam, and I'd probably feel a bit more comfortable starting there if I was just venturing into the commercial market for RM games. Of course, it doesn't hurt to get your game out on as many places as you can since different customers go to different portals.
 

SimProse

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Just curious if anyone here has published a game with Aldorlea and was willing to share their experience privately? I've heard really good things about them, just curious. Thanks!
 

Zeriab

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If it's something you can write about publicly then please share it here as well. I am sure it would be useful input when considering your various publishing possibilities.
 

Engr. Adiktuzmiko

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I think it's mainly because Aldorlea already have a following of people who plays RM games, so publishing with them will increase the chances that people will actually buy and play your game instead of publishing yourself or via a publisher that don't specialize with RM games... A lot of people have publishers that they trust for specific genres or engines so having your game published by a publisher known for the genre or engine that your game belongs too can give you a lot of benefits.
 

SimProse

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Engr: That was my thought process in going with them vs. self-publishing, since I don't have a track record with RPGM games. I do have Steam app credits and could self-publish, but I felt that going with Aldorlea gave me a visibility advantage with regard to these types of games. Just FYI: Private responses have been very favorable too, and i'll say that their lead person who has been answering my emails has been super upfront, friendly and helpful.
 

bgillisp

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One word. Visibility. I heard that as of right now, there have been over 4000 games published on steam in 2016 alone. That means that on average your game on steam has about 0.3 days to be noticed and bought before it disappears into the abyss. Not a good recipe for making money. Plus you get lumped into all the crap RPGMaker games that come out on steam that has turned many people off of games from that engine, which hurts your case even worse.


By publishing with them, you have two advantages that I can see. One is (like others have said) your game reaches the group of people who want to buy and play RPGMake games, and two, they have quality control (which steam doesn't at the moment). If your game is garbage, they won't accept it. Therefore, if your game gets on their portal, people know it is at least somewhat good in the end.
 

SimProse

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One word. Visibility. I heard that as of right now, there have been over 4000 games published on steam in 2016 alone. That means that on average your game on steam has about 0.3 days to be noticed and bought before it disappears into the abyss. Not a good recipe for making money. Plus you get lumped into all the crap RPGMaker games that come out on steam that has turned many people off of games from that engine, which hurts your case even worse.


By publishing with them, you have two advantages that I can see. One is (like others have said) your game reaches the group of people who want to buy and play RPGMake games, and two, they have quality control (which steam doesn't at the moment). If your game is garbage, they won't accept it. Therefore, if your game gets on their portal, people know it is at least somewhat good in the end


This is very true...visibility and access to a mailing list of people who play RPGM games is huge. And yes, they do have decent quality control standards; they won't automatically accept any thing that is sent their way. I've changed my game in a few ways since it was first sent to them, for the better, I believe.
 

Vox Novus

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Well I put a game on Indinera's site; didn't sell well or anything but that's more of my fault as a developer rather than the site.By the way, Indy takes a standard cut of the sales.


Reasons:


-Existing fan base; when you start out as a developer you have little to no fanbase. Indy has a dedicated following of people that traffic his site or watch out for games carrying the Aldorlea name. His fan base are also all fans and okay with playing rpg maker games.


-Dedicated forums; Indy's site has a dedicated forum for people to discuss the game and for you as a developer to reach out to consumers and see and respond to their feedback.


-Indy is an established person who has succeeded as a rpg maker developer. Publishing with him offers a chance to work with someone who got it right. He's also a fairly chill guy and is happy to help out people in the community by putting their games up on his site as long as he has the time to do it. He also does some of the work for you by setting it up on his site or through direct partnership with him (as some developers have their games published by him via steam).


On a personal level, It was sort of a mini-dream of mine to have a game on his site; to hang out with someone who I wish I could be like someday. My game didn't do well because of my own faults but I got to live that dream for a bit and I'm happy I did it.
 

Kyuukon

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I initially was tempted to but now that getting Greenlit on Steam is way easier than it was before, I see no point in it. Just pay up $100 once (which supposedly goes to charity) and forget. If your game is good it will most likely sell and get you noticed anyway. For me now, it's not worth the little extra income and marketing a deal with a publisher can provide. I'm my own publisher :D!
 
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