Your Opinions on Steam Greenlight?

Discussion in 'Commercial Games Discussion' started by bluebird, Nov 4, 2014.

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  1. bluebird

    bluebird Veteran Veteran

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    I'm just curious about other's opinions, seeing as we have a great mixture of developers who've actually been green-lighted, developers who are on green-light, and then simply gamers who take part in either the voting process or in buying the game upon release.

    I started voting on Green-light not too long ago.  While I know it's been out for a while, I didn't have much time to check out the games that were trying to get in, but now I find it a fun process.  I get my queue of games to look through, and I leave a constructive comment and decide whether I would buy the game or not.  It's always fun to see what people think up, and it's a great feeling to know that I might just help them to get on Steam.

    That being said...some of the entries were a bit...meh.  Isn't your Green-light page supposed to show what possible buyers could expect from the game?  Videos revolving around story or game mechanics, showcasing the world through concept art and animation, just giving a clear indication of what we can expect to receive.  There was one entry that had a video of the main character jumping across buildings and on roofs.  No music but the grunt of the character, no text...and when you scroll down to look at the written details, you see this game is supposed to involving time-jumping and chasing after bad guys and all these fantastic themes..that aren't even shown in the video.  While that one stood out to me the most, I did note that quite a few entries were similar in that they couldn't seem to combine what they promised with what they actually showed us.

    Sure, we could say that those types of games who didn't get their act together when they entered their game would not be voted into Steam anyway, and that's true, but I think of the people who are actively looking at these games and voting- there are 75 pages of games currently -  wouldn't it be more efficient for both game developers and voters to have some minor filtering system?  

    For example, the concept of the indie game is what is going to be the focus on the page itself.  I think they should solidify what they consider a concept and allow a small team to review the greenlight page for that concept before allowing voting.  It doesn't even need to be that strict- rather, have your video and art represent what your game is about.  If there are stealth ninja monkeys in your description, I'd better see some banana action in a video.  Videos and art that don't represent anything or offer your possible buyers ANY idea on what they can expect...that just kills me.  

    But yes, just a mild rant.  Not meant to be controversial!  I like Steam Greenlight, and it provides a lot of opportunities for plenty of developers!  I just dunno why games that look or seem unfinished are going to take up a spot on the ever-growing page of games.  Even games that are going to require kickstarter or indiegogo campaigns have to at least be convincing if they expect to be fulfilled...

    And.  Tweet.  That's all.  :>
     
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  2. Indinera

    Indinera Indie Dev Veteran

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    I'm not a fan of Greenlight. In most cases to get votes a game needs to promise Steam keys, which means less people will buy it when it is actually greenlighted. Completely defeats the purpose.
     
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  3. whitesphere

    whitesphere Veteran Veteran

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    I've never seen Greenlight, but from Indienera's post, it seems that it's not really a way to ever make much money even for really skilled indie devs.

    I would agree with the OP and think that developers need to showcase the great aspects of their games in their videos.  I think the effort put into making a video tells me a LOT about how much effort the developer put into polishing the game itself.  Now I know indie devs won't have any real budget for a video, but with the nifty video editing tools out there, I'm sure a very nice video can be created for not much money.  There's really no excuse if you want sales especially in a crowded online marketplace.
     
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  4. iMaple

    iMaple Noob Designer Veteran

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    I for one actually like Greenlight. Sure, a lot of "skilled devs" might be overlooked, but it filters out a large amount of crap that the RPG Maker Community is responsible for. I really believe if you have a game that is worth to get on Steam, it will get on Steam. Before this, there was no way to get on Steam without a publisher, so now developers at least have a opportunity. Also, if your game is good enough in your opinion but you are unable to make a good trailer and have a bandicam/xsplit watermark on it because you didn't want to invest money into the production, that's your fault. Marketing is an essential part of video game production, this goes from the trailer to getting a fanbase around your game before it even hits Greenlight. 
     
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  5. Lars Ulrika

    Lars Ulrika I punch Therefore I am Harvest the land Taking the Veteran

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    I never tried to vote for greenlight so far (I definetely should at least to support rpg maker games that are worth it imo). Though, I think so far you don't have thousands of solutions to filter the numerous crappy projects. 

    For now, I don't see a better way to do that than letting people vote. After if people do crappy project introduction, that's their call. 
     
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  6. phoenix_rossy

    phoenix_rossy Veteran Veteran

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    Personally, I'm on the fence about Greenlight.

    It's a fantastic theory; to filter out some of the absolute garbage that people put out after a week's work, thinking that they can cash in on an upward trend of accessible game engines (and therefore damaging the credibility of serious developers who take the time to polish their games). A Steam where there is no filtration system (see: Desura) would doom the average indie. Though I think they'll be going down the route of user-curation and scrapping Greenlight (not sure how that's going to pan out for devs like us- time will tell). 

    On the other hand, we have only a niche market. This means that for most of us, in order to get the bulk of votes we need to pass the threshold for Valve's approval, we practically have to give the game away to thousands of potential voters, with the promise of Steam keys. As Indi said; this cuts into your revenue when you finally get onto the platform. For example, I've got around 5x as many 'key activations' than I have sales on Steam. 

    HOWEVER, on yet another hand (where did that come from?) - I've just been granted access by Valve to release the third Data Hacker title without going through Greenlight, without the help of Degica or a major publisher. So in the end, persisting with Greenlight now means that I've proven my dedication and have a little more trust and freedom. 

    So I'm not really sure, personally. It has its pros and cons.
     
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  7. saintivan

    saintivan Veteran Veteran

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    Greenlight is the best thing I know for those of us with no publishing connections. For $100, you can put your game on trial for large numbers of people to look at. That levels the playing field. I had a concept I thought was good and rushed it out to Greenlight with alpha RTP game footage. There were a number of rpg maker trolls, but many people took the time to write useful comments; feedback for improvement, constructive criticism, and support. I found the experience worth way more than $100, and I will be submitting my game again in the coming months. RPG maker games may indeed generally be a niche market, but they can still have the necessary ingredients for real success: characters and story that draw you in. I also believe there is a big market out there that has yet to be touched.
     
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  8. Dreadshadow

    Dreadshadow Lv 38 Tech Magician Moderator

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    If a game is good, it might sell.On the other hand there are lots of people pushing shovelware made by Unity, RPG Maker, Game Maker, RenPy etc, etc through Greenlight. Then Steam gets full of bullcrap games.

    Meanwhile, there are games directly sold from comapnies into Steam that are really a waste of time and money. Greenlight is one way to get into the market. Nothing more. You should consider this an opportunity not a goal. Your goal is to make a game that the majority of people will enjoy playing. How it will be distributed is another thing.

    Thus I consider greenlight an opportunity, but at the same time Steam is a strange market. No seriously.  Steam keeps 30% of any incomes I think anyway. Not that I care when it comes to such a huge market.

    But I consider websites that sell such games a more appealing market really.
     
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  9. Kes

    Kes Global Moderators Global Mod

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    Dreadshadow, please refrain from necro-posting in a thread. Necro-posting is posting in a thread that has not had posting activity in over 30 days. You can review our forum rules here. Thank you.
     
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